Redditor fungiside was in the right place at the right time to capture this awesome image of a giant digital billboard during a video calibration test. We’re pretty sure this is a lot more fun to look at than whatever advertisement was subsequently displayed.

"The video is a test to make sure all of the individual panels are working together to make one complete picture. And actually, if you look about a quarter of the way up from the bottom, you will notice a horizontal line going all the way across and breaking the pattern. This is what they are looking for when doing a test like this."

Click here to watch a brief video of the psychedelic calibration process.
[via Twisted Sifter]

Redditor fungiside was in the right place at the right time to capture this awesome image of a giant digital billboard during a video calibration test. We’re pretty sure this is a lot more fun to look at than whatever advertisement was subsequently displayed.

"The video is a test to make sure all of the individual panels are working together to make one complete picture. And actually, if you look about a quarter of the way up from the bottom, you will notice a horizontal line going all the way across and breaking the pattern. This is what they are looking for when doing a test like this."

Click here to watch a brief video of the psychedelic calibration process.

[via Twisted Sifter]

We see clouds so often that it’s easy to forget how amazing they are. Thankfully German astronaut and geophysicist Alexander Gerst is currently aboard the International Space Station where he often spends his free time taking countless extraordinary photos of the Earth as it’s whizzing by 205 miles below.

Gerst is particularly fond of photographing dramatic shadows cast by cloud formations - something that we cannot see down here on Earth. These stunning photos remind how awesome clouds are as they cast shadows that stretch for thousands of miles across the planet’s surface. Shadows so long that they eventually disappear into the black horizon.

Follow Alexander Gerst’s Twitter feed for new photos shared daily.

[via Colossal]

French art director and illustrator Troqman makes clever use of both his pens and his sketchbooks as well as his surroundings in order to create entertaining drawings of characters appearing to interact with the real world. Our favorite pieces involve characters on multiple pages or sketchbooks interacting with each other as well as the 3D world. And then there’s Spider-Man who think’s he just found his long-lost father.

Troqman calls this playful hobby Cartoon Bombing and you can see a lot more of it over o Instagram or right here on Tumblr at troqman.

[via Bored Panda]

Korean artist Seung Mo Park (previously featured here) continues to develop and perfect his ability to create awesomely photorealistic sculptures using stainless steel wire mesh. Numerous layers of wire appear to form a holographic shadow world from which hauntingly beautiful faces and figures emerge.

"If you gaze at Park’s work for long enough, it almost seems as though he has dialed into some special channel caught between realities. A slight turn to the right and maybe his subject will become a real boy once and for all. A slight turn to the left and these ghostly figures might be subsumed forever."

Park’s sculptures appear so lifelike that it feels like it would only be mildly startling to see one of his faces or figures suddenly move, their eyes locking with our own, perhaps about to speak. We love how the wire mesh frays around the edges of some of the pieces, as though that’s where Park’s shadow world gives way to our own.

Visit Beautiful/Decay to view more of Seung Mo Park’s recent work.

Indian sand sculptor Sudarsan Pattinaik and 30 of his students created a massive installation depicting 500 Santas or ‘Sand-tas’ on the beach behind Panthanivas hotel in Puri, Odisha, India. Created in December 2012, the piece required nearly 5000 tons of sand and took about 4 days to complete. Intended to raise awareness about global warming, the displaced Santas were sculpted along with one large sand sculpture of Jesus and the message “Go green, save Earth.”

“I always try to give some awareness messages through my sculpture to the world, so I chose the awareness about global warming through Santas as the subject at the year end,” Pattnaik told the India Education Diary.

[via Inhabitat and Design Taxi]

In 1888 actress Ellen Terry performed the role of Lady Macbeth at London’s Lyceum Theatre while wearing an awesome green gown bedecked with the 1,000 sloughed-off wings of the jewel beetle. It quickly became one of the most celebrated costumes of the Victorian era, immortalized in a portrait painted by John Singer Sargent.

126 years is a long time and over the years Dame Terry’s dress experienced all sorts of wear and tear and numerous alterations. But after 1,300 hours of painstaking work over and £50,000 ($81,000) in expenses, this magnificent costume has been restored to its original glory.

Work began on the gown two years ago after a successful fundraising campaign, but restoring the beetle wings wasn’t the most difficult task. “We had collected the beetle wings that had fallen off over the years,” says Paul Meredith, house manager at Smallhythe Place, where the dress now resides, “so that the conservator was able to reattach many of the originals, plus others that had been donated to us—1,000 in total.” The restoration team patched the 100 or so broken wings using small pieces of Japanese tissue and wheat starch paste.

Click here to read more about the restoration process.

Photos by Zenzie Tinker

[via Morbid Anatomy and Ecouterre]

St. James, Minnesota resident Greg Krueger love his four cats so much that he’s spent the last 20 years and $10,000 transforming his home into a phenomenal feline fun house - and he’s still working on it.

“I just love trails and paths, and cats, of course,” said 50-year-old Krueger. “And so I’ve just linked those passions together.”

It all began when Krueger noticed how much his cats enjoyed being up high. First he created a place for them to sit atop a china cabinet. Then came a staircase to help the cats get up on the cabinet more easily. Today Krueger’s house features elaborate tunnels, staircases, platforms, 38 hand-carved cat-sized opening in his walls, 100 yards of overhead catwalks and bridges, and numerous comfy cat-sized hidey-holes. The catwalks all feature ornate railings to prevent accidental falls. If they don’t want to, Krueger’s kitties never have to walk on the floor. There’s also an enclosed outdoor kennel if the cats ever feel like getting some fresh air.

Krueger was recently diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome, which has helped him understand his extraordinary dedication to his feline family.

“Obviously, my house would not be like this if I didn’t have Asperger’s,” he said. “If it takes a long time, I don’t care because if I like what I’m doing, I almost don’t want to finish what I’m doing.”

Visit Greg Krueger’s Flickr page for many additional photos.

Click here for an interview with Kreuger and here for a video tour of his awesome home.

[via Oddity Central and Catsparella]

It’s never too early to start planning what to offer your neighborhood trick-or-treaters. These remarkably/horrifyingly lifelike gummy grubs and caterpillars would make awesome Halloween treats. Although they may look like they just wriggled out of your nightmares, they’re actually handmade, fruit-filled sweets. They’re made in Japan at Akai Tento no Koohii Ten (The Red Tent Coffee Shop), a small coffee stand located on the east coast of Aomori Prefecture.

We can’t stop staring at these photos, because we’re convinced one of the grubs is about to twitch. Akai Tento is a small business, but these amazingly unsettling creepy-crawly gummy candies have earned the shop nationwide (and now international) attention.

Each of Akai Tento’s gruesome gummies is available to buy individually or in packs (or perhaps that should be clutches?) via Yahoo! Japan Shopping, and cost between 300 and 350 yen (US$2.80-3.20) each.

Photos via Akai Tento and Yahoo! Shopping

[via RocketNews24]

Last week we featured a selection of exquisite works of cut paper art by a Japanese Kirie artist named Akira Nagaya. Today we learned that Nagaya also creates awesome cut-out depictions of beloved Anime, manga, cartoon and comic book characters using individual Post-it notes.

Visit Akira Nagaya’s Facebook page to view more of his playful pop culture Post-it cut-outs.

[via Spoon & Tamago]