These dreamlike sculptures are the work of Chinese artist Hu Shaoming, sculptor and graduate of the Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts. For his city series Shaoming created an awesome transparent blue mechanical seahorse, submerged in water with a silver cityscape on the top of its head emerging from the surface of the water.

For a series dealing with the concept of time, Shaoming disassembled old objects, such as cameras and telephones, and then rebuilt them with the surreally beautiful addition of zippers which open to reveal the inner mechanisms of each device.

Check out more awesome artwork by Hu Shaoming on Jue.so.

[via Colossal]

German artist Evelyn Bracklow of La Philie (previously featured here) has created another awesomely unsettling collection of beautiful vintage porcelain dishes and tableware covered in swarms of tiny hand-painted ants.

"Many of the new pieces are part of a unique partnership between the artist, Rijks Museum in the Netherlands, and Etsy. The pieces are hand-painted in Bracklow’s studio, signed, numbered and fired to 160 degrees.”

Each delicate, one-of-a-kind piece is as exquisite as it is utterly repulsive. Some of these pieces (and more) are currently available for purchase via the La Philie Etsy shop.

[via Colossal]

What is this? A center for ants?!

Today the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders is delighted to share Postcards for Ants, an awesome ongoing project by Cape Town, South Africa-based artist Lorraine Loots. Every day Loot creates one exquisitely detailed and utterly itty-bitty painting. The project began on January 1, 2013 as a personal 365-day challenge, which means she’d created hundreds of these amazing miniature works of art.

When Cape Town was designated as the World Design Capital 2014, Loot decided to do a second year of tiny paintings, 365 Postcards for Ants, this time using her home city as the theme for each piece. Although each original painting has already been spoken for, Loot creates 5 prints of each day’s painting, which can be ordered through the project website.

To view more of Postcards for Ants visit Lorraine Loots’s website or follow her on Instagram, Facebook or right here on Tumblr at paintingsforants.

[via WHUDAT and Bored Panda]

Our palms are sweating as we look at this vertiginously awesome drone photo of a team of nine mountain climbers atop the Jungfrau (elevation 13,642 ft), one of the main summits of the Bernese Alps in Switzerland. It’s a phenomenal shot that was captured using a camera with a fisheye lens attached to a drone. The climb was sponsored by Swiss mountaineering outfitter Mammut.
Click here for a brief process video to learn more about what went into achieving this hair-raising photo.
[via Colossal and The Verge]

Our palms are sweating as we look at this vertiginously awesome drone photo of a team of nine mountain climbers atop the Jungfrau (elevation 13,642 ft), one of the main summits of the Bernese Alps in Switzerland. It’s a phenomenal shot that was captured using a camera with a fisheye lens attached to a drone. The climb was sponsored by Swiss mountaineering outfitter Mammut.

Click here for a brief process video to learn more about what went into achieving this hair-raising photo.

[via Colossal and The Verge]

Smart people have all kinds of delicious stuff in their heads! Well, now you can eat it. You can get Edgar Allan Poe, William Shakespeare or Sigmund Freud candy in a book-shaped package. Each wrapper has the face of the genius on it. Shakespeare tastes like lemon, Poe is grape and for some mysterious reason Freud reminded us of bananas. Food for thinkers! Looks great on a bookshelf.

Buy them here

Source mcphee.com

London designer Dominic Wilcox just unveiled his visionary concept for the future of transportation. Behold the beautiful Stained Glass Driverless Sleeper Car of the Future. Traveling in this beautiful vehicle must be like taking a ride inside a giant Fabergé egg, which, of course, sounds incredibly awesome.

Wilcox presented his driverless glass car prototype at the London Design Festival 2014:

"In the future it will be safer to drive in a driverless car than it will in a manual car," said Wilcox. "Therefore we don’t need the protection systems that are built into contemporary cars. We can just have a shell of any design."

The designer imagined a future where all cars were controlled by computers that would eliminate collisions and accidents, meaning everyday vehicles would no longer need to be designed for safety.

Wilcox proposes that a perfectly safe self-driving car is a car that can be made out of something as fragile as glass and used as, in the case of this prototype, a sleeper car. It contains a cozy bed in which the rider can sleep while being driven to their destination. But there are many other possibilities besides a mobile bedroom. Liberated from the responsibility of driving, people could have cars that served as mobile offices, gyms, dining rooms, or lounges. The only limits are your imagination and, of course, your budget.

In addition to unveiling this daring prototype, Wilcox also launched a concept website, called TaxiRobot, where users can customize and order their own driverless cars for a variety of functions and featuring all sorts creative exterior designs.

Click here to watch a video about Dominic Wilcox and his stained-glass driverless car.

Photos by Sylvain Deleu

Head over to Dezeen for additional information about this fabulous futuristic concept car.

Houston, TX-based artist Nikita DevilxKat Leigh of Midian Craftworks created this awesome stained glass Stormtrooper Helmet Table Lamp. Even Emperor Palpatine himself would be impressed with this life-size sculpture made of 521 pieces of hand-cut glass, copper foil, 5-6 lbs of solder and probably some blood, sweat and Jedi tears to boot.

"After the glass was cut, the edges were ground down and each piece was wrapped in copper foil. I then soldered the pieces together, gave the helmet a good cleaning, patinated the solder black, and finally gave everything a nice waxing to polish the metal and make the glass shine! This piece has also been signed and dated.

The helmet itself measures approximately 12 x 12 x12 (inches). Included with the table lamp is a wooden base and a 6 foot lamp cord with a candelabra snap-in socket, rocker switch, and bulb. 40 watt bulbs are the maximum recommended.”

Despite what the top photo depicts, this fantastic piece of home decor isn’t intended to be worn by live humans. It’s quite heavy and fragile, but it does make for an awesome portrait. Currently available for purchase here.

Visit the Midian Craftworks Etsy shop for more geektastic stained glass creations and other crafts perfect for your “Dark & Dork Side.”

[via Technabob]

Dutch street painter Leon Keer (previously featured here) recently spent three days in the city of Nijmegen in the eastern Netherlands creating a new piece of awesome anamorphic art for an international drawing festival called The Big Draw. Although it doesn’t seem like it when viewing it from the front, this painting measures about 15 meters (~50 ft) long.

It depicts a little girl sitting in an empty trunk playing make-believe with her dog friend. The illusion is so convincing that, the first time we looked at the top photo, we didn’t realize the second girl perched on the inside of the lid of the trunk is a live person posing with the artwork and not part of the actual painting.

[via Leon Keer]

Whether you’re waiting in line for the new iPhone or hiding in the woods waiting to capture proof of the existence of Bigfoot, it’s crucial that you’re able to get some rest no matter where you are. Thank goodness for this awesome Wearable Futon Air Mat Set by Japanese office supply manufacturer King Jim:

The coat-like wearable futon can be fastened at the neck and the bottoms of the legs folded up to adjust for different heights or to make it snugger in colder seasons. The pack includes an air mat so you have a full blanket and futon set that is comfortable and quick to prepare (there’s even an air pump included to help). The wearable futon can be rolled up into a sack like a sleeping bag while the air bed-like mat flattens, making this super easy to store in the A4 file-sized pack.

Now there’s no need to pack a cumbersome bag with blankets and a pillow or suffer trying to sleep on the cold, hard ground. Not when you could be wearing a stylish pair of futon coveralls and then, when it’s sleepy time, inflate your personal air mattress and drift off to a peaceful sleep, quietly hoping that none of the poor suckers who don’t have their own wearable futons decide spend their sleepless hours trying to figure out if you and your air mattress will float or perhaps make a good toboggan.

Click here to order.

[via Japan Trend Shop]

Science + Art = Awesome!

Today the Department of Microscopic Marvels explores the exquisitely beautiful art of arranging Diatoms, tiny unicellular algae encased in jewel-like glass shells, into complex kaleidoscopic displays, some of which date back to the Victorian era. They’re works of art that are invisible to the naked eye and must be viewed under a microscope.

Ranging in size from 2 to 200 micrometers, diatoms are among the smallest organisms on the planet. They’re a form of phytoplankton and scientists estimate that there are roughly 100,000 existent species. To create the lovely and astonishingly tiny displays pictured above, diatoms must be found, captured, cleaned, organized and then finally positioned into aesthetically pleasing arrangements in microscope slides.

So how is all of this accomplished? English filmmaker Matthew Killip contacted Diatom specialist and master micromanipulator Klaus Kemp in order to find out. Kemp has dedicated his life to studying and perfecting this microscopic Victorian art form and Killip sat down with him to learn about the process of creating diatom arrangements. The result was a short film entitled The Diatomist.

Click here to watch and learn.

[via Colossal]