Finger Hands - Hey dude, did you ever wonder what it would look like if your fingers had tiny hands on the end as if they were arms? It’s a freak out! This set of five irresistible soft vinyl finger puppets fit snugly on the end of your fingers and look like a quintet of tiny right hands. Now you can give a high twenty-five.

Buy them here

Source mcphee.com

Bristol, England-based professional photographer Justin Quinnell turned his own mouth into a pinhole camera. He built a tiny camera using aluminum foil and a 110 film cartridge and takes awesomely unusual photos with the device inside his mouth, held in place by his back teeth. Quinnell uses his homemade camera to take tonsil-vision shots of everything from scenic travel destinations, his own feet soaking in the bathtub, a visit to the dentist and even the nightmarish image of a dead spider resting on his toothbrush as it enters his mouth. Basically he photographs anything that he thinks will make his kids laugh.

Sometimes he had to hold his mouth open, standing still, in front of his target for up to a minute for the film to be properly exposed

He said: ‘I originally invented the camera for its indestructibility, throwing it off buildings and things like that. It was after a few months of using it this way I for some reason pushed it into my mouth. Three years of Degree level photographic theory rushed through my brain and mouthy imagery evolved.’

Visit Justin Quinnell’s website to check out more of his wonderfully peculiar oral pinhole photography.

[via 22 Words and the Daily Mail]

Today we join the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders in astonishment at the golden mesh marvel that is the cocoon of the Urodidae moth. Also known as “false burnet moths,” these small to medium sized moths spend their pupal stage in unusual and incredibly beautiful open-mesh cocoons, which are sometimes suspended on a very long thread below a leaf.

"This type of cocoon is known as a "open-network cocoon" and is unlike other cocoons in that it doesn’t completely enclose the pupa in silk. Instead, it only partially surrounds it, likely enabling better airflow to control for humidity and may help prevent fungi from growing on, and eventually killing, the pupa. This cocoon very likely belongs to a moth in the family Urodidae, which is known for making this type of lattice-structured cocoon surrounding its pupa."

Click here to watch a video about these amazing structures.

Photos by Jeff Cremer, click here to view more.

[via Reddit, formakers and Smarter Every Day]

Less talk, more awesome LEGO monkey warriors!

Behold Tyler Halliwell's fantastic LEGO depiction of Sun Wukong, the Monkey King, a main character from the 16th century Chinese mythological novel Journey to the West. He possess amazing strength, speed and the ability to transform himself into a wide variety of animals and objects.

Halliwell’s LEGO sculpture features the Monkey King seated in the lotus position while wielding his trademark staff.

This is quite a large build, at 40”x15”x21” overall. I took influence from multiple Asian cultures in the design, especially with the Japanese samurai armor but with added Chinese and Korean influence.

Building the piece took about 100 hours over the course of two months and used roughly 1500 LEGO bricks.

Head over to The Brothers Brick for an interview with Tyler Halliwell about creating his mighty LEGO Monkey King.

[via The Brothers Brick]

Canadian artist Maskull Lasserre (previously featured here) has recently been “re-carving” mass-produced wooden souvenir sculptures and decoys to reveal intricate an skeletal system beneath each sculpture’s wooden skin.

These fascinating reworked wooden sculptures remind us of the dissected sculptures created by New York-based artist Jason Freeny (previously featured here).

Visit Maskull Lasserre’s online portfolio to check out more of his amazing artwork.

[via Colossal]

Thanks to an awesome visionary known only as the GIGABEETLE, we’re learning that, when he isn’t busy battling Kaiju, Godzilla has a very active social life. There’s cosplay and gaming and dancing and coloring and exercising and so much more.

For plenty more goofy Godzilla goodness follow GIGABEETLE right here on Tumblr at gigabeetle over on Twitter. You’re guaranteed many a good giggle.

[via io9]

Some things are so awesomely enormous that it’s difficult to grasp just how big they are until they’re put into a more relatable perspective. Today, thanks to Belgian amateur astronomer Michel (@quark1972), we get to appreciate the size of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (aka the rubber ducky comet).
This is the comet that the ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft reached on August 6, 2014 after a ten year, five month and four day-long journey nearly 4 million miles into space. The Rosetta will now spend the next two years studying the comet, including the deployment of a lander, the Philae, down to the comet’s surface.
Head over to the ESA website to learn lots more about this amazing mission.
[via io9]

Some things are so awesomely enormous that it’s difficult to grasp just how big they are until they’re put into a more relatable perspective. Today, thanks to Belgian amateur astronomer Michel (@quark1972), we get to appreciate the size of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (aka the rubber ducky comet).

This is the comet that the ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft reached on August 6, 2014 after a ten year, five month and four day-long journey nearly 4 million miles into space. The Rosetta will now spend the next two years studying the comet, including the deployment of a lander, the Philae, down to the comet’s surface.

Head over to the ESA website to learn lots more about this amazing mission.

[via io9]

This exquisitely, scrumptiously detailed Library Cake was made by Kathy Knaus. One side features the entrance to the brick library building, flanked by potted plants. The other side reveals the library’s cozy interior, complete with countless books lining its double-decker shelves, a large globe, and a wonderfully cluttered reading table accented with gum drop lamps.
Libraries are awesome places and cake is one of the best things ever, so this sweet, edible library is extra-mega-super-duper awesome.
[via That’s Nerdalicious!]

This exquisitely, scrumptiously detailed Library Cake was made by Kathy Knaus. One side features the entrance to the brick library building, flanked by potted plants. The other side reveals the library’s cozy interior, complete with countless books lining its double-decker shelves, a large globe, and a wonderfully cluttered reading table accented with gum drop lamps.

Libraries are awesome places and cake is one of the best things ever, so this sweet, edible library is extra-mega-super-duper awesome.

[via That’s Nerdalicious!]