Discussion of cosplay usually concerns the creation of awesome costumes. But some people don’t need to use a single piece of fabric, fiberglass, Wonderflex or EVA foam to create a spectacular look. Such is the case with Alexys Fleming, aka MadeYewLook, a completely self-taught make-up artist who can completely transform herself into anyone or anything using make-up, thoughtful lighting and sometime contact lenses and the occasional homemade headpiece or hat. Each character is so well-realized that some of the photos require a good long stare in order to find Lex’s actual facial features. And some of them are truly terrifying.

MadeYewLook also posts excellent tutorials on both her Facebook page and her YouTube channel. Even if you don’t want to try your hand at personal transformation with makeup, be sure to visit both her Facebook and YouTube accounts simply to check out many more of her incredible cosplay creations.

[via Kotaku Cosplay]

Remember that incredibly awesome Edgar Allan Poe sculpture we shared a couple weeks ago? That was the work of artist Stefanie Rocknak, and so is this amazing sculpture, which she carved from a single piece of wood.

Entitled The Swimmer, the sculpture is slightly larger than life-size and depicts a swimmer turning their head to take a breath during the crawl stroke. The sense of movement, both by the athlete and the water, is so palpable that we keep waiting for the swimmer to turn their face back into the water, complete the stroke and swim right out of the photos.

The Swimmer is the third part of a three piece commission called The Triathlete. The other two pieces are The Biker and The Runner. Click the links to check them out.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

Macau-based web designer and developer Varun Thota uses a toy plane that his dad found inside a chocolate Kinder Egg to create an ongoing photography series entitled My Toy Plane, in which a commercial airliner appears to soar over dramatic cityscapes. If it weren’t for the presence of his arm in each shot, you’d probably assume that the plane itself was real. We nearly did.

Through the photos, he not only gets to explore his interest in aviation, but also to build relationships with the people around him. He says, “The thing I enjoy most about the series is how fun it is to include other people in it. It’s always fun to show people the plane, tell them the story and then ask them for a helping hand in taking the shot.”

Follow Varun Thota on Instagram to check out more awesome photos from his My Toy Plane series.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

Japan has taken the humble hot dog and turned it into an adorably creepy lunchtime snack. According to RocketNews24, they’re called “sausage people”, which somehow makes them even creepier. These little red weenie folk appear all too eager to be boiled in soup, nestled in sandwiches or posed in cute bento meals.

There are undoubtedly children and adults throughout Japan entertaining each other by performing midday meal skits with their smiling sausage people. We know we would be.

[via RocketNews24]

Today we learned about a species of moth made of cotton candy.

Okay, not really, but these beautiful creatures are still awesome, even if they aren’t made of spun sugar. This is the Rosy Maple Moth (Dryocampa rubicunda), a small North American moth most often found in southern Canada from Ontario to Nova Scotia. They live in deciduous forests and feed mainly on maple trees, but we suspect that some specimens prefer to follow traveling carnivals where they hover over the cotton candy machines.

Photos by Svdmolen, Rhododendrites, Kristi Decourcy, Patrick Spurlock, Ezra S F, MacroscopicSolutions, and Lynette Schimming respectively.

[via Neatorama]

Joyce Lin is a student at the Rhode Island School of Design and in her spare time she creates awesome interactive kinetic sculptures like the beautiful flying fish and bird study pieces pictured here. Although the design and construction process must’ve been painstaking, they were made using simple materials such as popsicle sticks, mylar and tracing vellum.

Speaking about her work she says, “When people view and activate my sculptures, I would like them to feel a kind of childlike awe and wonderment while being reminded that we are part of an infinite chain of systems within systems.”

Visit Joyce Lin’s Behance page to check out more of her creations.

[via Junkculture]

As part of a tour put on by an organization called The Mystical Arts of Tibet, a group of Tibetan Buddhist monks from the Drepung Loseling Monastery in India recently visited the Crow Collection of Asian Art in Dallas, Texas. They were there for a weeklong residency during which they constructed this magnificent Tantric Buddhist mandala sandpainting.

The monks will spend up to eight hours a day working together on one of their sandpaintings. The process starts with an opening ceremony and the consecration of work site.

Each work begins as a drawing, the outline of the mandala. Then, colored sand is poured from traditional metal funnels called chak-purs. Each monk holds a chak-pur in one hand, while running a metal rod on its grated surface; the vibration causes the sands to flow like liquid.

Once the sandpainting has been completed it is ceremoniously destroyed using a ritual vajra.

"The sands are swept up and placed in an urn; to fulfill the function of healing, half is distributed to the audience at the closing ceremony, while the remainder is carried to a nearby body of water, where it is deposited. The waters then carry the healing blessing to the ocean, and from there it spreads throughout the world for planetary healing."

Click here to learn more about The Mystical Arts of Tibet

[via My Modern Metropolis]

A couple months have passed since we last paid a visit to Department of Awesome Book Art. These beautiful book sculptures were created by UK-based mixed media and collage artist Kerry Miller. Using old, discarded books as her subjects, Miller gives new life to each abandoned volume by painstakingly carving out and arranging the illustrations found within them. Sometimes she also uses inks or watercolors to enhance those illustrations.

“My work is a means of distilling the essence of a book, whilst releasing the images and allowing them to reach a new audience. I view it as a collaboration, a partnership with the past, giving new purpose to old volumes that may otherwise never see the light of day or simply end up in recycling. As technology threatens to replace the printed word, there has never been a better time to reimagine the book.”

Visit Kerry Miller’s website to check out more of her bibliotastic artwork.

[via Twisted Sifter]

When French illustrator Thomas Lamadieu looks up at the patches of blue sky between city buildings, he imagines fanciful characters existing in the geometric gaps formed by the neighboring buildings. Lamadieu shoots photos of those patches of sky and illustrates them for an ongoing series entitled Sky Art. Thus far he has drawn pictures on the skies over streets and enclosed courtyards in France, Germany, Belgium and Canada.

Head over to Thomas Lamadieu’s website to view more images from his whimsical Sky Art series.

[via Colossal]