These beautiful moths and butterflies look like they’re ready to flutter up and away, but they won’t be doing so because they’re wonderful textile sculptures painstakingly created by North Carolina-based artist Yumi Okita. She sews, embroiders and stitches all sorts of multi-colored fabrics to create these oversized insects, which measure nearly a foot wide. She also adds painted details along with feathers and artificial fur. With great care Okita has achieved an awesome balance between astonishing realism and fanciful invention.

Click here to view more of Yumi Okita’s gorgeous textile insect sculptures.

[via Colossal and Demilked]

The Department of Awesome Natural Phenomena just received word that Godzilla has been spotted unleashing his atomic breath into the skies somewhere over Michigan. Please watch out for flaming bits of kaiju falling from the sky.
(We’re still trying to figure out who actually took this photo. If you happen to know, please contact us so we can share proper credit info here)
[via Geekologie]

The Department of Awesome Natural Phenomena just received word that Godzilla has been spotted unleashing his atomic breath into the skies somewhere over Michigan. Please watch out for flaming bits of kaiju falling from the sky.

(We’re still trying to figure out who actually took this photo. If you happen to know, please contact us so we can share proper credit info here)

[via Geekologie]

Don’t run away! This particular “Nightmare in Silver" is 100% edible and not the least bit interested in destroying all life on earth. This Cyberman is an awesome cake made by Happy Occasions Cakes, a bespoke bakery located in Cwmbran, Wales. While we understand that the existence of this geektastic cake creates a distinct conflict between the Whovian survival instinct and sweet tooth, we’re pretty sure our overwhelming love of cake would triumph in the end.

Visit the Happy Occasions Cakes Facebook Page to check out more of their fantastic custom creations.

[via That’s Nerdalicious!]

British artist Shaun Hughes uses his engraving skills to create a wide variety of incredibly awesome hobo nickels. A couple months ago we shared his fantastic Storm Trooper Nickel. Today we share some more of his pop culture-inspired carved coins.

These pieces barely scratch the surface of the amount of artwork that Hughes produces. Be sure to visit his DeviantART gallery to check out more of his beautifully altered coinage.

[via Neatorama]

Think of a hobby or interest and odds are good you can now find a convention just for folks into that particular thing. Comic-Con, Gen Con, Dragon Con, Anime Expo, the official Star Trek Convention, Brickworld, Pax Prime, BronyCon, we’re barely scratching the surface. But what about people who love nothing better than making balloon art? Do they have a place to get together and share their mutual appreciation for blowing up balloons and twisting them together to form whatever their hearts’ desire? They sure do.

It’s called the World Balloon Convention and, thanks to the Pioneer Balloon Company, it’s been taking place since 2010. Balloon artists from around the world gather to show off their creations, compete against each other, and offer classes on balloon sculpture. This year’s convention took place in Denver, CO, where over 800 balloon professionals (decorators, twisters/entertainers, artists, retailers and instructors) from over 54 countries participated in the events.

All of the awesome balloon sculptures seen here were created for the convention’s most anticipated event, the Festival of Balloons. More than 75 artists displayed their balloon art at this year’s festival, which was attended by over 6000 people.

Click here to view more photos from the Festival of Balloons

[via Design Taxi and Neatorama]

This early 20th century photo reminds us of the Slicey the Pig Dashboard Wiggler. Could this be one of Slicey’s ancestors?

“The Pig Cafeteria” was an exhibit produced by the Department of Agriculture to educate farmers about new methods of farming and raising livestock — specifically, what to feed pigs so that they would be healthy and profitable.

Now we get it: Before a pig becomes so delicious that he starts offering up slices of himself for you to enjoy, he has to visit “The Pig Cafeteria” in order to fatten up.
[via Retronaut]

This early 20th century photo reminds us of the Slicey the Pig Dashboard Wiggler. Could this be one of Slicey’s ancestors?

“The Pig Cafeteria” was an exhibit produced by the Department of Agriculture to educate farmers about new methods of farming and raising livestock — specifically, what to feed pigs so that they would be healthy and profitable.

Now we get it: Before a pig becomes so delicious that he starts offering up slices of himself for you to enjoy, he has to visit “The Pig Cafeteria” in order to fatten up.

[via Retronaut]

Norwegian street artist Anders Gjennestad, aka Strøk, (previously featured here) recently enhanced the exterior walls of an elementary school in Gaeta, Italy with his signature hand-cut, multi-layered stencils. This was his contribution to the 2014 Memorie Urbane Street Art Festival. In this setting Strøk’s gravity-defying figures look like students let out for recess who decided to walk up the walls in search of a place to play.

Photos by Anne Esser

[via My Modern Metropolis and StreetArtNews]

Russian carpenter Yuri Hvtisishvili created this awesome life-size wooden replica of the classic classic IL-49 Soviet motorcycle. It looks so perfect that, were it not for the telltale color, it’s hard to believe the bike is completely made of wood, even the tires. The project began ealier this year when business was slow at Yuri’s carpentry shop and he wanted to try something new. Inspired by an internet post about a master carpenter’s full-scale wooden replica of a motorcycle, he decided to create a replica of his favorite Russian motorcycle, the IL-49.

"Yuri started to work on the project on January 18; it was the perfect activity to pass his time during the long winter evenings. He patiently carved out the motorcycle one part at a time, down to the last nut and bolt. He made use of two types of wood – beech and pine – mainly for the way they complement each other. Four months later, on May 18, the hyperrealistic motorcycle was completed."

Head over to Oddity Central for additional photos of Yuri Hvtisishvili’s fantastic wooden motorcycle.

Fear not arachnophobes (or maybe do?), you aren’t really looking at a gargantuan tarantula, you’re visiting the Department of Astonishing Optical illusions and this is the spectacular work of UK-based concept body artist Emma Fay. She used water-based paints to transform contortionists Lowri Thomas and Beth Sykes into awesomely lifelike animals. It took five hours to transform Thomas into a giant arachnid.

"First I ask the contortionist to get into the initial pose and mark out where they will be. The contortionists can only hold the pose for a maximum of five-seconds so I have to work quickly to get it right. I then keep painting and repositioning the models until they look like the real animal."

Head over to the Daily Mail for video footage of these amazing transformations as well as a wonderfully freaky glimpse of the giant spider in motion.

Visit Emma Fay’s website to check out more of her amazing artwork.

[via Design Taxi and Dailymail.co.uk]