The Japanese city of Nara is renown for its deer. Thanks to their legendary history, they’re regarded as heavenly animals, messengers of the gods according to Shinto belief, and guardians of both the city and Japan itself. A population of over 1000 remarkably tame Sika Deer reside in Nara Park, where they roam freely and visitors may feed them special biscuits, and every summer they do something strange and awesome. They leave the park and swarm the streets, lounging together on the sidewalks and sometimes right in the road, looking like they haven’t got a care in the world and the middle of the road is the perfect place to be.

YouTube user Blue Bells 9999 shot video of this marvelous phenomenon in 2013 and describes it as a regular occurrence in late July:

"…with the deer strolling out of the park to “enjoy the coolness of the street.” Given that the concrete sidewalk and asphalt road surface would ordinarily retain heat during the summertime, we’re guessing that the surrounding cityscape and topography creates either a cooling wind tunnel or an inviting patch of shade.

Although it might seem like an alarming event, Nara residents seem very used to the presence of the deer. It’s been happening for so long now that the city posts warning signs to drivers about deer crossing the road. No one honks at them or suddenly swerves to avoid them. We’d be so amazed by the sight of them that people would be honking at us for blocking traffic ourselves.

[via RocketNews24]

In an episode of The Simpsons entitled “Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?” (Season 2, Episode 15), at the request of his newly-discovered half-brother Herb, Homer designs a new car: “The Homer.” It’s the car of Homer’s dreams, a car for the “average” American, a car so ridiculous and expensive that it completely ruins Powell Motors his half-brother’s business.

That hilarious episode first aired back in 1991. Now, more than twenty years later, engineers at Porcubimmer Motors have created The Homer for real, complete with a bubble dome, a horn that plays “La Cucaracha,” and, we’re guessing, an engine that sounds like “the world’s coming to an end.”

Click here to watch a video about this awesome vehicular monstrosity.

Photos by David Moore (click here to view more photos of The Homer)

[via Neatorama and Technabob]

We love this tentacular Cthulhu chess set. This is the work of Kelsey of LittleFatDragons based in Clayton, North Carolina. Kelsey handmakes each playfully evil piece without using casting or molds, so the chess set is one-of-a-kind.

He may be evil, but Cthulhu is just too stinking cute in this handmade chess set. The Little Fat Cthulhu Custom Chess Set is made to order so you can go with the traditionally evil green and purple or change it up with colors of your choosing.

Here’s what you’ll find on your Cthulhu chess board.

Pawns – Little Fat Tentacles
Rooks – Rhogog
Knights – Zvilpogghua
Bishops – Chaugnar Faugn
Queens/Kings – Little Fat Cthulhu

Visit the LittleFatDragons shop to check out more of Kelsey’s awesome creations. 

Cthulhu fhtagn

[via Nerd Approved]

Put on your Ear Guards, the Department of Incredible Insects just learned about an awesome and terrifying discovery recently made in China. This monstrous creature is a member of the Megaloptera order and may be the world’s largest aquatic insect.

The specimen seen here was discovered in a mountain in Chengdu in China’s Sichuan province. Its wingspan measures 8.3 inches (21 cm) and it features a savage pair of mandibles.

Bec Crew from Scientific American explains more:

"Just as this new find is so far pretty mysterious, members of Megaloptera are also fairly poorly known. As larvae, they spend all of their time in the water, only venturing out once it’s time to pupate and become adults. While they’re usually found in clean, clear streams, rivers, swamps, ponds and lakes, they’re also perfectly capable of sustaining themselves in muddy and polluted water, which makes them extra hard to spot."

Visit io9 to learn more about this fascinating and nightmarish discovery. And please don’t go to sleep without those Ear Guards.

Born in Hong Kong and now based in Pittsburgh, PA, artist Bovey Lee painstakingly hand cuts astonishingly intricate designs and scenes on large sheets of thin Chinese rice paper. These mesmerizing works are as awesomely detailed as they are delicate. Look closely and you’ll discover cityscapes hidden among leaves and grass or cars driving along what you first took to be blades of grass. Practically weightless all by them selves, Lee mounts her fragile cut paper pieces on silk before they’re hung on gallery walls.

Visit Bovey Lee’s cut paper gallery to check out more of her amazing cut paper creations.

[via Colossal]

These tentacular Octopus and Giant Squid tables are the work of San Francisco-based bronze sculptor Kirk McGuire. The beautiful bronze cephalopods are so lifelike, we wouldn’t be surprised if you felt phantom tentacles tickling your ankles while sitting at either of these tables.

Visit Kirk McGuire’s website to check out his standalone bronze sculptures and more of his awesome undersea animal tables.

[via Neatorama]

This giant inflatable toad looks pretty pleased with himself. But then, if we were a giant toad with our own private lily pad big enough for us to bask on, we’d be pretty pleased with ourselves too. The 22-meter (72 foot) tall inflated amphibian is currently relaxing on the lake in Yuyuantan Park in downtown Beijing. He’s called the “Toad of Rejuvenation” or the “Golden Toad” and his presence is a traditional Chinese good luck symbol meant to bring “blessings and fortune.”

Meanwhile we’re wondering if the Golden Toad hopes that, if he sits there long enough, Florentijn Hofman’s world-traveling giant inflatable rubber duckie will eventually swim by.

Photos by Chen Boyuan of China.org

[via Neatorama]

There’s something awesome about a thing that’s so cute, it transcends cuteness to become nightmarishly creepy. That’s precisely the case with these impressively freaky pears, photographed last year at a supermarket in Beijing, China.

The pears are shaped like this by placing them inside special molds when they’re still very small. As they grow they fill the mold and take on its shape. They were marketed at the grocery store as “happy/joyful doll pears,” but we think they look like they’re patiently waiting for you to try taking a bite out of them, at which point they’ll start screaming bloody murder, or worse, turn you into a creepy pear-doll-person too.

[via Neatorama and RocketNews24]

Phil Weicker and Duncan Forster, Los Angeles-based friends and fellow car enthusiasts, spent nearly six years converting a classic 1969 Cadillac Coupe de Ville into an awesome mobile hot tub, the Carpool DeVille. Both former engineering students, the pair devised a watertight steering system and a way to use the car’s original V8 engine to maintain the hot tub’s ideal water temperature of 102F. The Carpool DeVille holds about 5000 lbs of water and has been fitted with a marine throttle to keep the engine running. What was the trunk now holds a pool filtering system.

Weicker and Forster recently used a Kickstarter campaign to raise the funds needed to get themselves and the Carpool DeVille to the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah this August in hopes of setting the Land Speed Record for the “World’s Fastest Hot Tub.”

"Nobody’s ever gone a hundred miles an hour in an open-air self-propelled hot tub while sitting neck-deep in soothing warm water. We aim to correct that mistake of history this August."

Head over to the Daily Mail for additional images as well as video footage of the Carpool DeVille in action.

[via the Daily Mail and Telegraph.co.uk]