German-born artist Gabby Wormann uses painstaking care to combine the delicate bodies of animals such as tarantulas, crabs and winged insects with intricate clockwork mechanisms to create beautiful creatures which she calls MeCre, or mechanical creatures.

"Wormann is interested in humanity’s intervention into complex biological systems, and her work postulates the hybrid forms’ role in the future. To the artist, they symbolize a synthesis between biomass and mechanics that will become part of our evolution. These creatures are more resistant, efficient, and technically optimized for a world where we are focused on continually improving at all costs."

Visit Gabby Wormann’s wesbite to check out more of her remarkable MeCre creations.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

"She may not look like much, but she’s got it where it counts, kid."

Star Wars fan Bill Deacon transformed his 1974 Chevy Malibu into a street-legal replica of the Millennium Falcon. The road vehicle-turned-spacecraft features all sorts of great details, including HANCHWY vanity plates and a field of streaking stars around the ship’s bow on the hood and front bumper. But our favorite feature is the cockpit mounted in place of the right starboard side-view mirror that contains Han Solo and Chewbacca action figures.

[via Geekologie]

The Kirin Beverage Company created awesomely tiny dioramas that fit into their own soft drink bottles for a series of advertisements for their line of beverages called “Sekai no Kitchen Kara” (“From the Kitchens of the World). The level of detail achieved with each handmade 1/48th scale bottled scene is completely awesome.

A tiny Thai kitchen, created for the Salt and Litchi (Lychee) flavor, features a well-stocked fridge that opens and closes, an illuminated burner for the miniature stove, countless itty-bitty food items and kitchen utensils, and even stains on the walls.

Click here to watch a video of the making of the Thai kitchen.

Visit RocketNews24 for additional images.

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FREE STICKERS!

Hey Geyser of Awesome readers, want free stickers? Your pals at Archie McPhee want to give them to you!

The first 500 people with a US address that want them can get this sweet set of three stickers mailed to them. One set person! We want to give them to you as a thank you for following.

As always, we appreciate any likes, reblogs and follows, but all you need to do is fill out the form.

Get your FREE STICKERS before they’re gone. 

Source mcphee.com

Neatorama recently assembled a fantastic collection of awesome children’s beds. These are a few of our favorites:

Bonnie in Jupiter, FL created a dinosaur-themed bedroom featuring a painted T-rex whose 3D head comes out of the wall to be the bed. The red bedding in a nice touch, since you’d be sleeping inside the dino’s mouth. What strange dreams a kid must have after falling asleep while staring at a giant reptilian uvula.

Posh Tots makes a viking ship bed so fancy that even the vikings themselves would’ve been envious - which means they’d probably raid the house and steal the bed, right?

Tiny Town Studios makes a wonderfully clever medieval castle murphy bed. We hope the carpet in that room is blue, so that it looks like you’re standing in the moat when the drawbridge-bed is up.

The giant Spider-Man bed is the work of Incredibeds. Who wouldn’t feel more secure sleeping on the belly of an enormous superhero? Maybe they can make us the giant snoozing Totoro bed we’ve always dreamed of.

Click here to view the entire collection of extraordinary beds.

[via Neatorama]

For a public installation entitled Magic Carpets 2014, French artist Miguel Chevalier transformed the floor of the Sacré Coeur cathedral in Casablanca, Morocco into an interactive psychedelic light show choreographed to music by Michel Redolfi.

Visitors walk across a massive carpet of light that first appears as an unstable monochromatic display before giving way to vivid blocks and whorls of color. The trajectory of the kaleidoscopic shapes and colors changes in response to visitors’ footsteps.

Click here for video of the installation in action.

[via designboom]

This may be a fantastic discovery, mistaken identity or a simply a beautiful hoax, but even so the idea is awesome. Manchester Metropolitan University professor John Hyatt claims to have photographed tiny fairies in flight while he was taking landscape photos over a two year period out in the countryside of Lancashire, England. He insists that the photographs are 100% real and haven’t been manipulated in any way.

“It was a bit of a shock when I blew them up, I did a double take,” he said. “I went out afterwards and took pictures of flies and gnats and they just don’t look the same. People can decide for themselves what they are.”

“I don’t believe they are just smaller versions of us and go home and have a cup of tea at the end of the day,” Hyatt pointed out. “And no one is suggesting they have any special powers. From my experience, they were just enjoying themselves and there was a little dance in the sunlight going on. They are just beautiful pictures and beauty can make people believe.”

Hyatt’s photos are currently on display in an exhibition entitled Rossendale Fairies at the Whitaker Museum in Whitaker Park, Rossendale, Lancashire, England.

[via Oddity Central]

Does this bedroom look like a dream come true or a saccharine nightmare? Either way it’s complete kawaii overload. A bright and disorienting “swarm of neon-colored cuteness.” Entitled Colorful Rebellion — Seventh Nightmare, the room is an immersive installation created by Japanese artist Sebastian Masuda.

"This installation, which filled the Kianga Ellis Projects in Chelsea, New York earlier this year, features a room bursting with manufactured objects of cuteness, including bundles of fake fur, stuffed animals, plastic jewelry, girl’s hair accessories, dollhouses, and other colorful toys that completely cover the walls and ceiling of the room. In the middle of the room is a bed, which visitors could lay upon and gaze up at the explosion of “Harajuku kawaii” closing in on them from every direction.”

Harajuku is an area in Japan known as a hub for Japanese youth culture and fashion. Fans of Japanese street fashion gather to show off all sorts of distinctive and outrageous styles. Masuda recognizes that this is sometimes much more than a flamboyant hobby. It’s often a vital coping mechanism for youth in Japan.

"One must understand that in Japan, therapy and psychological outlets are not as acceptable as they are in the United States," Masuda explains in his artist statement. "The majority of the time, these girls do not fit in with their classmates and community. Harajuku is not only a place where they can be different without consequence, it is also a place that provides fashion alternatives for girls to express dark emotions in flamboyant, alternative styles."

In addition to being an artist, Masuda owns a Japanese boutique called 6%DOKIDOKI and has been very influential in popularizing kawaii culture, both within Japan and around the world.

[via My Modern Metropolis and The Huffington Post]