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6 posts tagged Aerial

Pierre Lesage took this awesome aerial photo of a vast corn maze created in a cornfield located in Hastings, New Zealand. Lesage say the design of the maze changes each year. The design you see here is from 2008

“The photograph was taken with a kite flown high above the area, a technique known as KAP (kite aerial photography) that Lesage specializes in. For those wondering what that little red object is, Lesage says it’s a red telephone booth and part of the maze design!”

[via Twisted Sifter]

Pierre Lesage took this awesome aerial photo of a vast corn maze created in a cornfield located in Hastings, New Zealand. Lesage say the design of the maze changes each year. The design you see here is from 2008

“The photograph was taken with a kite flown high above the area, a technique known as KAP (kite aerial photography) that Lesage specializes in. For those wondering what that little red object is, Lesage says it’s a red telephone booth and part of the maze design!”

[via Twisted Sifter]

This awesome portrait, a work of aerial land artwork in Amsterdam measuring the length of two football fields, was created by Cuban-American contemporary artist Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada and completed thanks to the help of 80 volunteers.
Commissioned by a feminist organization called Mama Cash for their campaign, “Vogelvrije Vrouwen - Defend women who defend human rights,” the work “depicts the portrait of an anonymous Mesoamerican woman in honor of female activists and as a protest against their persecution in the Mesoamerican region.”
Check out a 360 virtual tour of the artwork here.
Visit Designboom to view photos of the construction process.

This awesome portrait, a work of aerial land artwork in Amsterdam measuring the length of two football fields, was created by Cuban-American contemporary artist Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada and completed thanks to the help of 80 volunteers.

Commissioned by a feminist organization called Mama Cash for their campaign, “Vogelvrije Vrouwen - Defend women who defend human rights,” the work “depicts the portrait of an anonymous Mesoamerican woman in honor of female activists and as a protest against their persecution in the Mesoamerican region.”

Check out a 360 virtual tour of the artwork here.

Visit Designboom to view photos of the construction process.

A few weeks ago we posted about an awesome forest shaped like a guitar that had been planted by an Argentinian farmer in memory of his late wife. Today we discovered another monumental symbol of love expressed with trees:

Unless you happen to be passing overhead, you’d never know that the rolling Gloucestershire countryside has been keeping a very romantic secret for the past 17 years. Mr. Winston Howes, owner of a 112-acre farm near Wickwar, Gloucestershire, married his wife Janet in 1962. In 1995, after Janet’s sudden death due to heart failure at the age of 50, Winston decided to create a lasting tribute to his lost love. He planted thousands of oak saplings in a six-acre field right beside his farmouse, leaving an open heart-shaped area in the middle, the point of which faces Janet’s childhood home.

The trees have since grown into a lovely forest all their own and the heart into a mature meadow. What makes the heart-shaped meadow even sweeter is that it cannot be seen from the ground. The secret heart is only accessible via a trail that leads up to its tip.
Mr Howes, 70, said: ‘I came up with the idea of creating a heart in the clearing of the field after Janet died. I thought it was a great idea – it was a flash of inspiration – and I planted several thousand oak trees. Once it was completed we put a seat in the field, overlooking the hill near where she used to live. I sometimes go down there, just to sit and think about things. It is a lovely and lasting tribute to her which will be here for years.’

‘We planted large oak trees around the edge of the heart then decided to put a hedge around it too. The heart points towards Wotton Hill, where Janet is from. We plant daffodils in the middle that come up in the spring – it looks great. I go out there from time to time and sit in the seat I created.’

The heart remained a family secret until it was unintentionally discovered by a hot air balloonist, Andy Collett, 42, from nearby Wotton-Under-Edge, who was recently passing overhead:
Andy said: ‘I have my own balloon and am quite a regular flyer, but this was the most amazing sight I have ever seen from the sky. It was a perfect heart hidden away from view – you would not know it was there. You can just imagine the love story.’ 

Photos by Adam Gray

Visit Dailymail.co.uk to view more of Adam Gray’s photos of Winston Howes’ secret and enduring tribute to his late wife.

[via Super Punch, Guardian.co.uk, and Dailymail.co.uk]

Source Daily Mail

Sometimes people do truly awesome things in the name of love. It was love that drove Argentinian farmer Pedro Ureta to transform part of his land in Argentina’s Pampas into a multi-coloured guitar-shaped forest that stretches 2/3 of a mile:

"After flying over fields in the Pampas that resembled a milk pail, Pedro Ureta’s wife Graciela suggested they embed a design into their own fields. Ureta never really had time to think about turning his field into a giant work of art, and told her they would put the project off until they both had more time. In 1977, Graciela unexpectedly died from a brain aneurysm, and her dream was lost forever.

Crushed by the loss of his love, a few years later Ureta began working on designing a guitar in his field that could be seen from above by airplane. He settled on the design because his late wife loved the instrument and he wanted to memorialize her on his land.

Working tirelessly to plant and cultivate the trees, Ureta created a perfect guitar shape, complete with a star-shaped hole in the middle. Using mostly cypress trees to form the outline, Ureta used blue eucalyptus trees to accent the strings on the neck of the guitar. Easily visible from airplanes, the guitar brings joy to many who fly over the Pampas.”

And then there’s a bittersweet little coda: It turns out that Pedro Ureta is afraid of flying. Because of this he has only ever seen his awesome guitar-shaped forest in photos taken by others. It would seem that it’s enough for him to know that he accomplished the task he set out before him in remembrance of his departed wife.

[via Technabob and Atlas Obscura]

Source technabob.com

He can’t possibly know how to fly one safely.
Well, safety ain’t the point of a joyride, Threepio.

C-3PO and Han Solo (after Paploo steals a speeder bike)

We’re guessing we aren’t the only people who grew up wishing for our own Speeder Bikes. Thanks to California-based engineering company Aerofex, who have developed the awesome hovering aerial vehicle seen here, our wishes might yet come true.

Watch a video demonstration of the flying bike here!

[via Designboom]

Aerial is an awesome new site-specific installation created by Baptiste Debombourg (previouslyat an old Benedictine monastery called Brauweiler Abbey near Cologne, Germany. Debombourg used numerous sheets of shattered laminate glass to mimic a frothy flood of water rushing into a room. Remarkably beautiful work. We wish we could view it in person. See more of Aerial by clicking on the thumbnails here

[via Colossal]