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64 posts tagged Anatomy

Artist Lara Hawker lives in Auckland, New Zealand where she’s taught herself how to paint faces and bodies with awesome results that range from delightful to outright terrifying. That cute little kitty clearly isn’t a fan of Attack on Titan. Hawker recently participated in the Body Art Rocks Convention in Wellington, NZ where she won the Advanced Face Art category with this amazing animorph piece.

Head over to Lara’s DeviantART page or follow her here on Tumblr larahawker to check out more of her fantastic body painting.

[via Neatorama and Laughing Squid]

Canadian artist Maskull Lasserre (previously featured here) has recently been “re-carving” mass-produced wooden souvenir sculptures and decoys to reveal intricate an skeletal system beneath each sculpture’s wooden skin.

These fascinating reworked wooden sculptures remind us of the dissected sculptures created by New York-based artist Jason Freeny (previously featured here).

Visit Maskull Lasserre’s online portfolio to check out more of his amazing artwork.

[via Colossal]

Macabre baking maven Annabel de Vetten of Conjurer’s Kitchen (previously featured here) created this deliciously gruesome dissected cake in response to frequently being asked what’s inside her elaborately decorated cakes and what they taste like:

"Of course only the pretty cakes look like this on the inside, all the creepy and unusual cakes are yummy sponge cakes in many different flavours! ;-)

OK, so I’m kidding. Everything is tasty.”

[via Conjurer’s Kitchen]

For his ongoing series of anatomical sculptures, New York-based artist Jason Freeny (previously featured here) recently completed this fantastic dissection of Bugs Bunny. Bugs doesn’t seem to mind very much that he’s lost an eye and a good quarter of his skin and muscle have been peeled away. Then again, he’s always been a pretty insouciant, wascally rabbit. We’re also willing to bet that, could we see inside of it, his stomach would be full of well-crunched carrots.

Head over to Jason Freeny’s Facebook page to check out some process photos for this awesome sculpture.

[via Nerdcore]

Meet Zeta the Giant Anteater and her awesomely impressive 2-foot-long tongue. Zeta lives in England at the Cotswold Wildlife Park & Gardens and recently became a new mum after giving birth to an incredibly cute anteater pup.
Giant Anteaters are native to Central and South America. Their amazing tongues are typically 60 cm (24 inches) long, covered in backward-curving papillae and coated in thick, sticky saliva. The better to collect countless scrummy ants and termites with.
Photo via Cotswold Wildlife Park & Gardens.
Head over to ZooBorns for photos of Zeta with her extraordinarily cute pup.
It’s Amazing Animal Day on Geyser of Awesome!

Meet Zeta the Giant Anteater and her awesomely impressive 2-foot-long tongue. Zeta lives in England at the Cotswold Wildlife Park & Gardens and recently became a new mum after giving birth to an incredibly cute anteater pup.

Giant Anteaters are native to Central and South America. Their amazing tongues are typically 60 cm (24 inches) long, covered in backward-curving papillae and coated in thick, sticky saliva. The better to collect countless scrummy ants and termites with.

Photo via Cotswold Wildlife Park & Gardens.

Head over to ZooBorns for photos of Zeta with her extraordinarily cute pup.

It’s Amazing Animal Day on Geyser of Awesome!

"Jeepers creepers, where’d ya get those peepers?"

For a project entitled Your Beautiful Eyes, Armenian physics teacher and photographer Suren Manvelyan (previously featured here) used his students, colleagues and friends as models for his awesome series of close-up ocular portraits. When viewed up close the anatomy of the human eye suddenly appears incredibly alien and unfamiliar. The longer you look at each photo, exploring its unique textures and colors, the less it feels like you’re looking at a human eye.

Manvelyan says, ‘It is quite natural when you shoot macro shots of insects and plants, but to try to make a picture of the eye? I did not expect these results.I was not aware they are of such complicated appearance. Everyday we see hundreds of eyes but do not even suspect they have such beautiful structure, like surfaces of unknown planets.’

If you’re wondering how Manvelyan creates these marvelous images, so are we. He says the process is a closely-guarded secret. But even if we can’t find out how he does it, we can still see plenty more of his work over at Suren Manvelyan’s website.

[via My Modern Metropolis, Bored Panda and Dailymail.co.uk]

It’s The Eyes Have Have It Day on Geyser of Awesome!

Seattle-based science professor and photographer Adam Summers shot an awesome series of photos, entitled Cleared, for which he used bleach and different dyes to alter aquatic subjects to create beautifully detailed images that look like colour x-rays.

Summers explains: “The technique uses two vital dyes – Alcian Blue to stain cartilaginous elements a deep blue and Alizarin Red S to turn mineralized tissue crimson. The specimen is then lightly bleached with hydrogen peroxide to remove dark pigments, leaving a snow-white fish. Flesh is dissolved with Trypsin, a digestive enzyme found in your intestine… In order to make the skin and remaining connective tissue invisible the entire specimen is immersed in glycerin.”

And so once again we see that Art + Science = Awesome.

Visit My Modern Metropolis to learn more about how Adam Summers creates these stunning images.

Just in time for Christmas, Jason Freeny (previously featured here) has turned his artistic dissection skills from toys back to sweets to reveal the internal anatomy of a gingerbread man with an awesome new anatomy schematic print entitled Gingerbread Man Dissected.
Available here via 1XRUN as a special holiday limited edition run of 75, Gingerbread Man Dissected will only be available until Christmas Day.
[via Jason Freeny]

Just in time for Christmas, Jason Freeny (previously featured here) has turned his artistic dissection skills from toys back to sweets to reveal the internal anatomy of a gingerbread man with an awesome new anatomy schematic print entitled Gingerbread Man Dissected.

Available here via 1XRUN as a special holiday limited edition run of 75, Gingerbread Man Dissected will only be available until Christmas Day.

[via Jason Freeny]

Meet Penny Smith and her heart. That’s right, this photo shows Penny holding her own heart in her hands. Now 35 years old, from age 3 to 6 she battled non-Hodgkins T-cell lymphoma. Then, in 1994, she developed heart problems. Last year Penny successfully underwent a heart transplant, which is how she was able to pose for this awesome photo. It was taken a few months after her transplant:

"That was in the hospital in the pathology lab," Smith said. "I was saying goodbye to my heart, actually, because I felt like it got me through half of my life and I needed to say goodbye to it. So I was saying goodbye, and getting to know my new heart.
"My doctors made me wait because they didn’t think I was ready. I wanted to be able to hold it, and they didn’t want me to drop it.
"I was happy to see it again-well, see it for the first time, I guess.
"My husband even got to hold it. It felt really weird for both of us, but it was amazing to get to hold something that was once in someone."

Click here to read more about Penny and her two hearts.
[via Neatorama]

Meet Penny Smith and her heart. That’s right, this photo shows Penny holding her own heart in her hands. Now 35 years old, from age 3 to 6 she battled non-Hodgkins T-cell lymphoma. Then, in 1994, she developed heart problems. Last year Penny successfully underwent a heart transplant, which is how she was able to pose for this awesome photo. It was taken a few months after her transplant:

"That was in the hospital in the pathology lab," Smith said. "I was saying goodbye to my heart, actually, because I felt like it got me through half of my life and I needed to say goodbye to it. So I was saying goodbye, and getting to know my new heart.

"My doctors made me wait because they didn’t think I was ready. I wanted to be able to hold it, and they didn’t want me to drop it.

"I was happy to see it again-well, see it for the first time, I guess.

"My husband even got to hold it. It felt really weird for both of us, but it was amazing to get to hold something that was once in someone."

Click here to read more about Penny and her two hearts.

[via Neatorama]

Artist Sandy Cramer of Knot Just Rope in Rockbridge, Ohio, spent 2.5 hours with water-based white paint, a brush, and a Vet Tech anatomy book as a reference in order to transform her horse Raven into the awesome Skeleton Horse you see here. If you visit Sandy’s Knot Just Rope shop in Rockbridge, you might get the meet Raven in person.

Click here to learn more about the making of the Skeleton Horse.

[via Laughing Squid]