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1364 posts tagged Animals

American oil painter Donald Roller Wilson combines the polished realism of the Old Masters with a cast of eccentric anthropomophized animal characters, including dogs, cats and plenty of primates - many of whom are smokers - to create awesome pop surrealist portraits. His regular characters include Cookie the Baby Orangutan, Jane the Pug Girl, Jack the Jack Russell “Terror,” Loretta the Actress Cat, Miss DogAmerica, and Patricia the Seeing Eye Dog of Houston.

According to the New York Times, “Donald Roller Wilson’s goofy, hallucinogenic, Old Master-style painting of monkeys, dogs and cats dressed up in antique costumes may be kitsch, but it’s high-quality kitsch, like good beach reading.”

One of our favorite things about his paintings is that Donald Roller Wilson creates a brief narrative for each of them, much like Travis Louie (previously featured here) does for his own ever-expanding cast of characters.

We recommend visiting Donald Roller Wilson’s online gallery to view many more of his wonderfully strange paintings and read the stories that go with them.

[via Faith is Torment]

Kevin Champeny
School of Transcendence
42 Kevin Champeny
School of Transcendence
42 Kevin Champeny
School of Transcendence
42 Kevin Champeny
School of Transcendence
42 Kevin Champeny
School of Transcendence
42 Kevin Champeny
School of Transcendence
42 Kevin Champeny
School of Transcendence
42

Artist Kevin Champeny (previously featured here) just completed an awesome new, spectacularly detailed mosaic entitled School of Transcendence. This beautiful koi and the water through which it’s swimming are made of 25,000 hand cast resin fish. That’s a lot of tiny fish.

The finished piece measures 42” x 60” x 1.5”. The longer we look at it, the more we keep expecting this dazzling school of fish to suddenly burst apart as each tiny fish swims away.

[via kchampeny]

Reblogged from kchampeny

This early 20th century photo reminds us of the Slicey the Pig Dashboard Wiggler. Could this be one of Slicey’s ancestors?

“The Pig Cafeteria” was an exhibit produced by the Department of Agriculture to educate farmers about new methods of farming and raising livestock — specifically, what to feed pigs so that they would be healthy and profitable.

Now we get it: Before a pig becomes so delicious that he starts offering up slices of himself for you to enjoy, he has to visit “The Pig Cafeteria” in order to fatten up.
[via Retronaut]

This early 20th century photo reminds us of the Slicey the Pig Dashboard Wiggler. Could this be one of Slicey’s ancestors?

“The Pig Cafeteria” was an exhibit produced by the Department of Agriculture to educate farmers about new methods of farming and raising livestock — specifically, what to feed pigs so that they would be healthy and profitable.

Now we get it: Before a pig becomes so delicious that he starts offering up slices of himself for you to enjoy, he has to visit “The Pig Cafeteria” in order to fatten up.

[via Retronaut]

Fear not arachnophobes (or maybe do?), you aren’t really looking at a gargantuan tarantula, you’re visiting the Department of Astonishing Optical illusions and this is the spectacular work of UK-based concept body artist Emma Fay. She used water-based paints to transform contortionists Lowri Thomas and Beth Sykes into awesomely lifelike animals. It took five hours to transform Thomas into a giant arachnid.

"First I ask the contortionist to get into the initial pose and mark out where they will be. The contortionists can only hold the pose for a maximum of five-seconds so I have to work quickly to get it right. I then keep painting and repositioning the models until they look like the real animal."

Head over to the Daily Mail for video footage of these amazing transformations as well as a wonderfully freaky glimpse of the giant spider in motion.

Visit Emma Fay’s website to check out more of her amazing artwork.

[via Design Taxi and Dailymail.co.uk]

Meet two of the tiniest avian members of the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders, a Green-crowned Brilliant hummingbird (Heliodoxa jacula) (top) and a Green Violetear hummingbird (Colibri thalassinus) (bottom). These stunning macro photos provide an remarkably close look at two incredibly small and fast-moving birds - both covered in the itty-bittiest feathers you’ll ever see. They were taken by photographer Chris Morgan in Costa Rica at the Bosque de Paz biological reserve in 2011.

"The hummingbirds were so tempting to photograph to the point of madness! Eventually with patience you get quite close, and I love seeing the details of these little guys," says Morgan.

Head over to Chris Morgan’s Flickr page to check out more of his wonderful photos, including an entire album of beautiful bird photos.

[via Lost At E Minor]

Something awesome, surreal and possibly even a little bit magical is happening on a quiet street in the Toxteth district of Liverpool, England. Every night, when the clock strikes 10:00pm, the sliding storefront shutter on a derelict building opens to reveal a radiant blue tank of water filled with live, luminous jellyfish silently swimming around the space.

This dreamlike scene is a site-specific art installation created by artistic duo Walter Hugo & Zoniel for the Liverpool Biennial. Entitled The Physical Possibility of Inspiring Imagination in the Mind of Someone Living, the piece was not promoted in advance in any way. Instead it simply started happening and will continue making its punctual 10pm appearance until July 27, 2014.

If you can’t make it to Liverpool before the end of the month, you can click here to watch some video footage of the installation, which was shared by Neal Bryant.

[via designboom]

Last year we first featured the work of NY and LA-based Lifestyle Pet Photographer Seth Casteel, who created an awesome series of high-speed underwater photos of dogs diving in to fetch their tennis balls. Casteel is back with what might be an even more delightful series, because this time he’s photographed puppies in the middle of exuberant underwater lunges.

His latest book, entitled Underwater Puppies, is due to be released in September 2014. For now you can still order copies of his first book, Underwater Dogs, via Amazon.

Visit Seth Casteel’s Facebook page and Instagram account for many more of his hilarious underwater dog photos, prints of which are available via Zenfolio.

[via Twisted Sifter]

Because what isn’t awesome about this happy-go-derpy Parrotfish photobomb? That’s just what we thought too, it’s completely awesome. This infectiously happy fish swam into the frame in front of some Snuba divers near the Eastern Dry Rocks coral reef southwest of Key West, Florida.
Photo by Snuba Key West
[via Telegraph.co.uk]

Because what isn’t awesome about this happy-go-derpy Parrotfish photobomb? That’s just what we thought too, it’s completely awesome. This infectiously happy fish swam into the frame in front of some Snuba divers near the Eastern Dry Rocks coral reef southwest of Key West, Florida.

Photo by Snuba Key West

[via Telegraph.co.uk]

What’s your patronus? Artist Alicia Braumberger created this whimsical (and sometimes awesomely adorably) “Spotter’s Guide to Rare and Unusual Patronuses,” which makes us wish a person could have more than one:

Just one of those things that I always wondered about. Stags and otters are all very well, but what if you end up with a tiny chameleon or giant blue whale? I mean, it could be a giant tub of nutella…

Anyway, so glad I got around to doing this pic -drawing the less attractive animals was awesome.

Popped it up on Redbubble because they have tote bags and cushions now which is just wow - can grab it also on cards or posters - check it out here!

Reblogged from alicia-mb

Because this is a fun sentence one rarely gets to use: Here’s an awesome example of nature imitating terrifying candy. This giant earthworm bears a remarkable resemblance to the World’s Largest Gummy Worm we first posted about a couple years ago.

This colossal creepy-crawly was found by Project Noah member Hoppy4840 in rich, wet forest soil in the foothills of the Sumaco Volcano in Ecuador. It measured approximately 1.5 meters (~4.9 feet) long and weighed at least 500 grams (~1.1 pounds). Funny thing is, we can’t help but think that, while it’s quite likely the earthworm is more nutritious, there’s no way it’s as tasty as the gummy version.

[via Geekologie]