Today the Department of Phenomenally Fancy Antennae found its new mascot: this amazing little male beetle from the family Phengodidae, also known as glowworm beetles. Their larvae are known as glowworms. Male glowworm beetles use their fancy-schmancy, feather-like antennae to detect and follow pheromones produced by female beetles.
This extravagant creature was found and photographed by Project Noah contributor LuisaMarinaLópezArias in Manizales, Caldas, Colombia.
[via TYWKIWDBI]

Today the Department of Phenomenally Fancy Antennae found its new mascot: this amazing little male beetle from the family Phengodidae, also known as glowworm beetles. Their larvae are known as glowworms. Male glowworm beetles use their fancy-schmancy, feather-like antennae to detect and follow pheromones produced by female beetles.

This extravagant creature was found and photographed by Project Noah contributor LuisaMarinaLópezArias in Manizales, Caldas, Colombia.

[via TYWKIWDBI]

French artist Edouard Martinet (previously featured here) has created a new series of astonishing assemblage animals, which will be on exhibit at Sladmore Contemporary in London from November 27th to January 31, 2014. Edouard thoughtfully uses all sorts of scrap materials to create these marvelous animals and assembles them without soldering or welding the parts together.

Each time we look at one of his incredibly intricate pieces, it’s as though we’re seeing his work for the very first time. Christopher Jobson of Colossal put it perfectly:

"When looking at these perfectly assembled sculptures by French artist Edouard Martinet (previously) it’s difficult to believe the raw materials he used ever existed in another form. Yet every head, thorax, leg, wing, and eye from these assorted creatures was once part of a car, bicycle, typewriter, or other found object. Reading through his material lists it becomes clear how completely thorough and judicious Martinet is in selecting the perfect objects to realize his vision, truly a master of his craft.”

Visit Edouard Martinet’s website to view more of his awesome scrap metal creatures.

[via Colossal]

These awesome macro photos of insects and arachnids are the work of Israel-based photographer Dmitriy Yoav Reinshtein. The level of detail is truly astonishing.

“The artist says all of the bugs are alive when he photographs them, and when he is done, he lets them fly away. Exactly how that works is a mystery - seems pretty tough! - but Reinshtein certainly has the speed and skill to capture each perfect moment. He is so quick, oftentimes he is even able to document a single drop of water balancing precariously atop a bug’s head.”

Visit My Modern Metropolis to view more of Dmitriy’s amazing photos.

Cephalopodoptera / Squid Moth
Finland-based artist Vladimir Stankovic has created an awesome series of animated illustrations of an entirely new class of organisms: Cephalopodoptera. These beautiful creatures appear to be a combination of various mollusc (Octopuses and squid) and insect (Moths and beetles) species. What a wonderful discovery for the worlds of art and science alike!

"Cephalopodoptera is a newly discovered order of species, a link between molluscs and insects. They live in the deepest underwater caves of the oceans worldwide. With the characteristics and intelligence of moths, beetles, octopuses and squid, these animals have managed to remain hidden for centuries. As we speak, tests and experiments are being carried out in order to know more about these mysterious and elusive creatures…”

Visit Laughing Squid to view many more of Vladimir Stankovic's shimmering and tentacular creatures.

Cephalopodoptera / Squid Moth

Finland-based artist Vladimir Stankovic has created an awesome series of animated illustrations of an entirely new class of organisms: CephalopodopteraThese beautiful creatures appear to be a combination of various mollusc (Octopuses and squid) and insect (Moths and beetles) species. What a wonderful discovery for the worlds of art and science alike!

"Cephalopodoptera is a newly discovered order of species, a link between molluscs and insects. They live in the deepest underwater caves of the oceans worldwide. With the characteristics and intelligence of moths, beetles, octopuses and squid, these animals have managed to remain hidden for centuries. As we speak, tests and experiments are being carried out in order to know more about these mysterious and elusive creatures…”

Visit Laughing Squid to view many more of Vladimir Stankovic's shimmering and tentacular creatures.

Source Laughing Squid