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3028 posts tagged Art

Here’s an awkward family photo for the ages, courtesy of Carollyne Yardley, our favorite Squirrealist painter (previously featured here).
This fall Carollyne is starting an awesome new project called “The Anonymous Family Portrait.” She’ll be offering family portrait photo sessions using our using our Squirrel Masks.

It started with a conversation with my dad.
Dad: I don’t want you putting our photographs on the webMe: Ok, Roger that.

"No more worries about posting all your personal photos for the world to see with the Anonymous Family Portrait." Instead turn your family into a unique work of Squirrealism. We love it.
[via Carollyne Yardley]

Here’s an awkward family photo for the ages, courtesy of Carollyne Yardley, our favorite Squirrealist painter (previously featured here).

This fall Carollyne is starting an awesome new project called “The Anonymous Family Portrait.” She’ll be offering family portrait photo sessions using our using our Squirrel Masks.

It started with a conversation with my dad.

Dad: I don’t want you putting our photographs on the web
Me: Ok, Roger that.

"No more worries about posting all your personal photos for the world to see with the Anonymous Family Portrait." Instead turn your family into a unique work of Squirrealism. We love it.

[via Carollyne Yardley]

For an ongoing guerrilla art project called Goldenroach Hungarian designer and visual artist Miklós Kiss, aka kissmiklos, has been smuggling 14-carat gold-plated bronze cockroaches into museums across Europe, making them part of the. Since 2011 Kiss has secretly placed his roaches inside the Tate Modern, Tate Britain, the British Museum, MUMOK, Hamburger Bahnhof, Centre Pompidou and the Louvre. In addition to sneaking his golden roaches into the galleries themselves, he also places the matching Goldenroach souvenir postcards into the museum gift shops.

On March 25, 2014 Kiss traveled to the US and successfully placed his roaches inside the Museum of Modern Art in New York. That same month the Goldenroach project went from guerrilla art to featured exhibition, entitled Goldenroach Unlimited, at the M0 project space of the Műcsarnok / Kunsthalle in Budapest. There Kiss exhibited a massive assembly of 12,000 plastic Goldenroaches along with one 14-carat gold roach hidden among the the plastic horde. Visitor were even invited to take one plastic Goldenroach home with them.

[via Lost At E Minor]

Check out that awesome googly-eyed velociraptor! He’s a giant industrial origami project called KitRex and he was created by Lehigh University grad student Lisa Glover.

"KitRex began as a homework assignment where I was asked to research a manufacturing process and demonstrate it in a unique way. I decided to research Industrial Origami, and over the course of 50 hours I designed, cut, and built a wearable 15-ft long velociraptor out of cardboard. I took him to a costume ball, and when I tromped into the room, literally everyone stopped to stare. He was the star of the evening, and everyone wanted one. I knew I had to do something."

Lisa then started (and successfully funded) a KitRex Kickstarter project to help her mass-produce an adorable 3-foot-long KitRex (since most people don’t have the space for a 15-ft paper dino). After months of prototyping and testing with kids between 8 - 12 years old, the final KitRex was born as a bristol board model that’s easily flat-packed and shipped anywhere (But you have to add your own googly eyes). A few lucky Kickstarter contributors were rewarded with giant 15-foot KitRexes of their very own.

Lisa isn’t quite ready to ship the KitRex, but for the time being you can click here to download a free pattern that fits on a standard 8x10 sheet of paper. It’ll be like playing with a dino hatchling.

[via Uproxx and KitRex]

Brazilian illustrator Gabriel Picolo is just over 100 days into an awesome art project called 365-DaysofDoodles. It’s exactly what it sounds like - Picolo is drawing something new in one of his Moleskine sketchbooks every day for a year. However these are some of the finest “doodles” we’ve ever seen.

Each drawing is unique and often inspired by some sort of pop culture source, featuring his own version of characters from anime, tv, movies and fine art.

Click here to view all of the daily doodles that Picolo has created thus far and then be sure to check back to watch him update the project.

[via Design Taxi]

German-born artist Gabby Wormann uses painstaking care to combine the delicate bodies of animals such as tarantulas, crabs and winged insects with intricate clockwork mechanisms to create beautiful creatures which she calls MeCre, or mechanical creatures.

"Wormann is interested in humanity’s intervention into complex biological systems, and her work postulates the hybrid forms’ role in the future. To the artist, they symbolize a synthesis between biomass and mechanics that will become part of our evolution. These creatures are more resistant, efficient, and technically optimized for a world where we are focused on continually improving at all costs."

Visit Gabby Wormann’s wesbite to check out more of her remarkable MeCre creations.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

The Kirin Beverage Company created awesomely tiny dioramas that fit into their own soft drink bottles for a series of advertisements for their line of beverages called “Sekai no Kitchen Kara” (“From the Kitchens of the World). The level of detail achieved with each handmade 1/48th scale bottled scene is completely awesome.

A tiny Thai kitchen, created for the Salt and Litchi (Lychee) flavor, features a well-stocked fridge that opens and closes, an illuminated burner for the miniature stove, countless itty-bitty food items and kitchen utensils, and even stains on the walls.

Click here to watch a video of the making of the Thai kitchen.

Visit RocketNews24 for additional images.

For a public installation entitled Magic Carpets 2014, French artist Miguel Chevalier transformed the floor of the Sacré Coeur cathedral in Casablanca, Morocco into an interactive psychedelic light show choreographed to music by Michel Redolfi.

Visitors walk across a massive carpet of light that first appears as an unstable monochromatic display before giving way to vivid blocks and whorls of color. The trajectory of the kaleidoscopic shapes and colors changes in response to visitors’ footsteps.

Click here for video of the installation in action.

[via designboom]

Does this bedroom look like a dream come true or a saccharine nightmare? Either way it’s complete kawaii overload. A bright and disorienting “swarm of neon-colored cuteness.” Entitled Colorful Rebellion — Seventh Nightmare, the room is an immersive installation created by Japanese artist Sebastian Masuda.

"This installation, which filled the Kianga Ellis Projects in Chelsea, New York earlier this year, features a room bursting with manufactured objects of cuteness, including bundles of fake fur, stuffed animals, plastic jewelry, girl’s hair accessories, dollhouses, and other colorful toys that completely cover the walls and ceiling of the room. In the middle of the room is a bed, which visitors could lay upon and gaze up at the explosion of “Harajuku kawaii” closing in on them from every direction.”

Harajuku is an area in Japan known as a hub for Japanese youth culture and fashion. Fans of Japanese street fashion gather to show off all sorts of distinctive and outrageous styles. Masuda recognizes that this is sometimes much more than a flamboyant hobby. It’s often a vital coping mechanism for youth in Japan.

"One must understand that in Japan, therapy and psychological outlets are not as acceptable as they are in the United States," Masuda explains in his artist statement. "The majority of the time, these girls do not fit in with their classmates and community. Harajuku is not only a place where they can be different without consequence, it is also a place that provides fashion alternatives for girls to express dark emotions in flamboyant, alternative styles."

In addition to being an artist, Masuda owns a Japanese boutique called 6%DOKIDOKI and has been very influential in popularizing kawaii culture, both within Japan and around the world.

[via My Modern Metropolis and The Huffington Post]

This awesome Gundam mobile suit is made of stone, stands 13 feet tall, weighs 10 tons and might just be the most geekstastic headstone we’ve ever seen. It was photographed in front of a stonemasonry shop outside a Kise Sekizai Boseki Center in Yasu City, Shiga Prefecture, Japan.

Kise Sekizai is a chain of Japanese grave makers in the area. According to the watermark on Google Street View it was last seen in 2013 and probably still stands there to this day.

If your business is building tombstones and your population includes an ever-increasing number of anime-loving Otaku, it seems both shrewd and ambitious to advertise such extravagantly geeky custom grave markers. We love it.
[via RocketNews24]

This awesome Gundam mobile suit is made of stone, stands 13 feet tall, weighs 10 tons and might just be the most geekstastic headstone we’ve ever seen. It was photographed in front of a stonemasonry shop outside a Kise Sekizai Boseki Center in Yasu City, Shiga Prefecture, Japan.

Kise Sekizai is a chain of Japanese grave makers in the area. According to the watermark on Google Street View it was last seen in 2013 and probably still stands there to this day.

If your business is building tombstones and your population includes an ever-increasing number of anime-loving Otaku, it seems both shrewd and ambitious to advertise such extravagantly geeky custom grave markers. We love it.

[via RocketNews24]

Look closely, these aren’t you’re average landscape photos. These are aquascapes. Did you notice the fish swimming past? Aquascaping is the craft of arranging aquatic plants as well as rocks, stones, driftwood and other hardscape elements in an aquarium. It’s gardening under water, often with fish who reside in the beautiful underwater landscape.

It’s a challenging hobby and, like many other hobbies, for those interested in such things there’s also a competitive element:

"The world of competitive aquarium design, or aquascaping, is just as difficult, expensive, and cutthroat as any other sport but requires expertise in many different fields to guarantee success. Aquarium designers possess large amounts of expertise in biology, design, photography, and excel in the art of patience, as individual aquascapes can take months if not years to fully mature into a completed landscape.”

The aquascapes seen here were part of the International Aquatic Plants Layout Contest (IAPLC), the world’s largest nature aquarium and aquatic plants layout competition.

Head over to Colossal to view more.