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3216 posts tagged Art

London-based fabric artist Lucy Sparrow just opened a very unusual and utterly charming pop-up grocery store in Bethnal Green, east London. Called The Cornershop, it sells all the everyday items a person could need with one special catch: they’re all made from felt. All of the fruit, snacks, drinks, frozen dinners, chewing gum, newspapers, and even the cash register are made of soft, fuzzy felt.

Sparrow’s awesome project was funded thanks to an overwhelmingly successful Kickstarter campaign, funding from the Arts Council and a sponsorship from UK confectionery manufacturer Swizzels Matlow. Work on the shop began in January 2014. Sparrow spent seven months painstakingly stitching together 3,944 felt items. By the time the work was finished she’d made over 250,000 stitches.

"I’ve always made big things. I like coming up with huge projects where the result is bigger than me and it takes over my life. I’m very obsessive and I want that to come across in the work and get people thinking ‘Who would be crazy enough to do this?’ I like getting up at the crack of dawn and beavering away at something, knowing that so many other people are still asleep.

The felt shop was born out of a desire to make an exhibition that was so all-encompassing that when everyone came in they were just blown away by the extent of the work, the labour involved.”

Lucy Sparrow’s stitched cornershop will be open throughout August. All of her felt shop products are available for purchase with prices ranging from £3 ($5 US) for a cigarette lighter to £840 ($1420 US) for the store’s cash register (the most expensive item in the shop).

Don’t worry if you can’t make it to London to check out The Cornershop in person. You can still visit the shop to peruse and even purchase its products via The Cornershop website.

Photos by Rosie Hallam

[via Telegraph.co.uk and Dailmail.co.uk]

These dazzling photos by Mohammad Domiri reveal the awesome interiors of Grand Mosques in northern Iran. Domiri is a physics student and self-taught photographer interested in documenting traditional architectural monuments found throughout the Middle East, mosques in particular.

Domiri described his work in a Daily Mail interview:

"In Iran, we have many historical sites - but some of the greatest are places of worship like mosques. As we have a grand mosque in every big city there are many historical buildings with lots of beautiful mosaics to capture.

I like looking for the symmetry, mosaics and artworks in these temples. I like how they let the light come inside and columns are special too as they divide interior space and give some depth.

Maybe some of these historical sites will not exist in 20 years or change a lot during that time. When I am capturing these pictures, I think about how they will be recorded and in future I hope people will be able to see their beauty.”

These beautiful mosques, ornately decorated with mesmerizing mosaics and geometric patterns, require special permission to be photographed, which makes Domiri’s stunning photos all the more exceptional.

To view even more of these amazing photos visit Mohammad Domiri’s website, 500px page, or his Facebook page.

[via DeMilked and Dailymail.co.uk]

This 1949 Cadillac has an awesomely shiny $382.95 paint job. That is, it’s been covered in exactly 38, 295 pennies. Affectionately called “Penny,” she was customized by and belongs to the Thompson family. The pennies were affixed to car one at a time using silicone glue over a 6 week period during the summer of 1999. Altogether they add over 200 lbs to the vehicle’s weight. All but four of the pennies were attached head side up. They’re all American pennies and include one 1817 Large Cent coin, 2 error pennies and 4 1943 steel pennies.

We love that the Thompsons display their Penny Caddy with a sign that reads “Please Touch the Car!” We’d certainly want to.

Click here for additional photos.

[via Twisted Sifter and Rodz Back Alley]

Today the Department of Awesome Parenting checks in on the work of Nina Levy (previously featured here), the Brooklyn-based artist and mother of two lucky sons who’ve been receiving beautifully illustrated napkins with their boxed lunches every day since 2006. Nina used waterproof markers and paint pens to transform plain white napkins into vibrant works of art and notes of affection and encouragement for her sons.

Nina recently won the TUACA Liqueur Company’s napkin art competition for her entry featuring two lions enjoying a drink at a bar.

Visit the Daily Napkins blog or Facebook page to check out more of Nina’s amazing illustrated napkins.

[via Lost At E Minor and Bored Panda]

Self-taught Alaskan sculptor Lee Cross, known professionally as Wood Splitter Lee, creates incredible one of a kind fantasy creatures that are so remarkably lifelike they verge on creepy, which is just one of the things that makes them so awesome. All of Lee’s creatures are completely made by hand without the use of and patterns, molds or casts. Their bodies contain articulated skeletons wrapped with stuffing, making them very soft to handle and fully posable. They’re decorated with carefully hand-applied synthetic fur and paint. As you can see from these photos, some of Lee’s creatures are more fantastic in nature than others, but they’re all amazing to behold.

Lee’s creatures are available for purchase through weekly Auction Adoptions held on eBay.

To check out more of her phenomenal handmade creatures, visit Wood Splitter Lee’s DeviantArt gallery.

[via DeMilked]

We love this tentacular Cthulhu chess set. This is the work of Kelsey of LittleFatDragons based in Clayton, North Carolina. Kelsey handmakes each playfully evil piece without using casting or molds, so the chess set is one-of-a-kind.

He may be evil, but Cthulhu is just too stinking cute in this handmade chess set. The Little Fat Cthulhu Custom Chess Set is made to order so you can go with the traditionally evil green and purple or change it up with colors of your choosing.

Here’s what you’ll find on your Cthulhu chess board.

Pawns – Little Fat Tentacles
Rooks – Rhogog
Knights – Zvilpogghua
Bishops – Chaugnar Faugn
Queens/Kings – Little Fat Cthulhu

Visit the LittleFatDragons shop to check out more of Kelsey’s awesome creations. 

Cthulhu fhtagn

[via Nerd Approved]

Born in Hong Kong and now based in Pittsburgh, PA, artist Bovey Lee painstakingly hand cuts astonishingly intricate designs and scenes on large sheets of thin Chinese rice paper. These mesmerizing works are as awesomely detailed as they are delicate. Look closely and you’ll discover cityscapes hidden among leaves and grass or cars driving along what you first took to be blades of grass. Practically weightless all by them selves, Lee mounts her fragile cut paper pieces on silk before they’re hung on gallery walls.

Visit Bovey Lee’s cut paper gallery to check out more of her amazing cut paper creations.

[via Colossal]

These tentacular Octopus and Giant Squid tables are the work of San Francisco-based bronze sculptor Kirk McGuire. The beautiful bronze cephalopods are so lifelike, we wouldn’t be surprised if you felt phantom tentacles tickling your ankles while sitting at either of these tables.

Visit Kirk McGuire’s website to check out his standalone bronze sculptures and more of his awesome undersea animal tables.

[via Neatorama]

This giant inflatable toad looks pretty pleased with himself. But then, if we were a giant toad with our own private lily pad big enough for us to bask on, we’d be pretty pleased with ourselves too. The 22-meter (72 foot) tall inflated amphibian is currently relaxing on the lake in Yuyuantan Park in downtown Beijing. He’s called the “Toad of Rejuvenation” or the “Golden Toad” and his presence is a traditional Chinese good luck symbol meant to bring “blessings and fortune.”

Meanwhile we’re wondering if the Golden Toad hopes that, if he sits there long enough, Florentijn Hofman’s world-traveling giant inflatable rubber duckie will eventually swim by.

Photos by Chen Boyuan of China.org

[via Neatorama]

Summer is now in full swing which means it’s Tanbo season in Japan. Last year we shared some amazing examples of Tanbo art (田んぼアート) or “rice paddy art”, created by Japanese farmers (aided by lots of volunteers) who work by hand to plant different strains of rice in order to transform their rice paddies into colossal living canvases. No artificial coloring methods are used to create these awesome scenes. Each color is simply a different type of rice.

"While planting, different areas of the rice paddy are roped off, so people know which type of rice to put where—kind of like painting by numbers.

Rice is planted in the spring, and then harvested in the fall. When it gets close to harvest, the color changes to a beautiful hue called “koganeiro” (黄金色), which is often translated as “golden” or “honey-colored”. This means the art changes as the seasons change.”

The rice paddies pictured at the top of this post depict a celestial maiden from the Japanese legend of Hagoromo beside Mount Fuji, which was recently recognized by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.

Visit Kotaku for additional images.