Tag Results

3288 posts tagged Art

New York-based food artist Jessica Siskin has an awesome motto:

"because everything tastes better when it’s made of rice krisp treat. except pizza.”

Siskin seems to have mastered the art of recreating just about any food or food package in the form of a yummy Rice Krispies Treat sculpture. She also recreates plenty of otherwise inedible objects as well, which means we can finally enjoy satisfying bites of turntable and boom box.

To check out many more of Jessica Siskin’s mouthwatering Rice Krispies Treat creations and keep up with her latest work, follow her on Instagram at mister_krisp.

[via Make:Craft and BuzzFeed]

Feast your eyes on this mouthwatering entirely condiment-based portrait of the inimitably awesome Sir Patrick Stewart as Captain Jean-Luc Picard. It was painted by artist Jennifer Marshall using ketchup, mustard, hoisin sauce and bleu cheese sauce. “Commander Data, please bring the veggie tray. Number One, you’re in charge of supplying the tater tots. Commander Worf has the onion rings. Snacks raised everyone? Engage.”
[via Geek Crafts]

Feast your eyes on this mouthwatering entirely condiment-based portrait of the inimitably awesome Sir Patrick Stewart as Captain Jean-Luc Picard. It was painted by artist Jennifer Marshall using ketchup, mustard, hoisin sauce and bleu cheese sauce. “Commander Data, please bring the veggie tray. Number One, you’re in charge of supplying the tater tots. Commander Worf has the onion rings. Snacks raised everyone? Engage.”

[via Geek Crafts]

This awesome Salacious B. Crumb purse was created by Astoria, New York-based artist Cat Penfold, who used her painting skills to give the leather purse a geektastic makeover. This excellent likeness of Jabba the Hutt’s naughty Kowakian monkey-lizard comes without the little jester’s shrill cackle. In fact, every time he opens his mouth, it’s only so that you can shove something into or pull something out of it, which sounds really cathartic.

This Salacious Crumb Purse is currently available here via Cat Penfold’s Knit One, Pearl Two Etsy shop.

[via Technabob]

Louisville, Kentucky-based artist Tom Pfannerstill creates amazing works of art that look like trash, and not just any trash, but actual pieces of litter that he actually found and picked up. For an ongoing series entitled From the Street, Pfannerstill uses the trompe l’oeil technique to paint flat pieces of wood so that they become uncanny likenesses of discarded objects and disposable containers, everything from a smashed boxes of Animal Crackers and Cracker Jack to a beat-up old baseball cap.

"…he starts off by choosing a real piece of trash and traces the outline of the object onto a flat piece of wood. Once his wooden canvas is ready, he fills it in with acrylic paints, in painstaking detail. The two-dimensional painting soon comes to life, looking exactly like a piece of trash it was modeled after."

So why paint depictions of trash? We’re glad you asked. Pfannerstill views each object he finds as something mass-produced that’s become utterly unique as it has been altered by time and exposure to the elements. No two pieces of litter are the same.

“The sparkling clean surfaces are smudged and marked by everyday dirt, grit and grime. No two objects have exactly the same journey.”

Pfannerstill also regards these piece of urban detritus as future artifacts:

“As time inevitably marches on and everything, trash included continues to change, my little pieces ‘from the street’ will become increasingly ‘of a time’. As the popularity of products ebb and flow and certain products disappear altogether as wants, needs and lifestyles change, the will become increasingly esoteric.”

Visit Tom Pfannerstill’s website to check out more of his artwork, including more pieces from his From the Street series.

[via Oddity Central]

Colossal, the Department of Incredible Insects recently encountered more photos of the fascinating work of French artist Hubert Duprat and his industrious Caddisflies (previously featured here).

"Right now, in almost every river in the world, some 12,000 different species of caddisfly larvae wriggle and crawl through sediment, twigs, and rocks in an attempt to build temporary aquatic cocoons. To do this, the small, slow-moving creatures excrete silk from salivary glands near their mouths which they use like mortar to stick together almost every available material into a cozy tube. A few weeks later a fully developed caddisfly emerges and almost immediately flies away."

Since the 1980s Duprat has been collecting caddisfly larvae from their normal environments and transporting them to aquariums in his studio. There he gently removes their own natural cocoons and puts the larvae in tanks filled with materials such as pearls, beads, opals, turquoise and pieces of 18-karat gold. The insects still do exactly what comes naturally to them, but in doing so they create exquisite gilded sculptures that they temporarily call home. If you saw them out of context, you’d never guess they’d been created insects.

Visit Colossal for additional images and video of Hubert Duprat discussing these amazing insects and their shiny, shiny creations.

Meet Dewi the Dragon, awesome guardian of Harlech Castle located in Harlech, Gwynedd, Wales. Classed by UNESCO as a World Heritage site, the castle is a medieval fortification built atop a spur rock beside the Irish Sea by Edward I during his invasion of Wales between 1282 and 1289. Dewi came along much later.

In 2010 artist Anthony Peacock from Marche Studios in Shropshire, England, was commission to create a magnificent dragon. 78 square meters (~840 square feet) of steel sheets were cut down into scales and then welded on to a frame, polished, and then coated with 12 coats of lacquer to form Dewi the Dragon, who measures 16 feet long, 11 feet high and 10 feet wide. The project took 800 hours of work to complete. Dewy now stands guard below Harlech castle near the entrance to Min-y-Don Holiday Home & Touring Park.

Photos by El Civ, Harry and Rowena Kennedy, Eddie Evans, and Huw Harlech respectively.

Visit Kuriositas for additional images of Dewi and to learn more about the history of Harlech Castle.

New York City-based artist Zoë Williams creates awesomely strange felted wool sculptures of spectral creatures that look like species you’d encounter if you were magically dropped into one of Hayao Miyazaki's films such as Spirited Away or Princess Mononoke. Most of Williams’ sculptures are created using white wool, which heightens their otherworldly feel. She speaks to this on her website with an apposite quotation from Melleville’s Moby Dick:

"Symbolize whatever grand or gracious thing he will by whiteness, no man can deny that in its profoundest idealized significance it calls up a peculiar apparition to the soul."

Williams has been creating her singular sculptures for over seven years now, so the pieces pictured here barely scratch the surface of her unearthly oeuvre. Be sure to visit Zoë Williams’ website, Flickr page or Instagram account to check out more of her fantastic felt creatures. Although most of her work is shown in gallery exhibitions, she also has an Etsy shop where she sometimes makes her pieces available for purchase.

[via Laughing Squid]

Less talk, more awesome monkey selfies!

A few years ago we featured an unforgettable photo of a Black-crested macaque in in North Sulawesi, Indonesia who snapped her very own beaming self-portrait using photographer David Slater’s camera.

Shapeways member Pete Rossdale just created this fantastic 3D-printed sandstone sculpture based on the famous monkey selfie. Available here.

[via Super Punch]

We’ve all become locked into staring contests with these awesome paintings by Taiwanese artist Chang Chia-Ying. Really, we can’t look away.

"Her Russian doll-like portraits of animals and chubby children stare into the distance with hollow, glazed over expressions on their faces. Likewise, the viewer is invited to look through them; their torsos are a window into an alternate reality. They are surrounded by mysterious fairytale gardens, inspired by the cartoons Chia-Ying watched as a child."

Less talk, more staring contests with mesmerizing painted monkeys! You may need to come help us look away or at least bring over some snacks and join in. If enough of us stare back at these beguiling characters, one of them is sure to blink soon. Right?

Visit Chang Chia-Ying’s website to check out more of her dreamy, hypnotic paintings.

[via Hi-Fructose]

Cammi Upton is an artist and self-proclaimed “cryptofluffologist” who creates awesomely detailed hand-embroidered movie monsters. Her process is incredibly painstaking, but the fantastically ghastly results she achieves groan growl howl speak for themselves.

I start by blocking out the piece in a few different colors of felt and then I cover the entire piece in stitches with sewing and embroidery thread. It’s an extremely time consuming process since I do it all by hand. I bring them with me everywhere in the hopes that I’ll get a chance to work on them!

Head over to Cammi Upton’s website or follow her Instagram account to check out more of her monstrous art and other works of Cryptofluff.

[via Make:Craft]