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3321 posts tagged Art

London designer Dominic Wilcox just unveiled his visionary concept for the future of transportation. Behold the beautiful Stained Glass Driverless Sleeper Car of the Future. Traveling in this beautiful vehicle must be like taking a ride inside a giant Fabergé egg, which, of course, sounds incredibly awesome.

Wilcox presented his driverless glass car prototype at the London Design Festival 2014:

"In the future it will be safer to drive in a driverless car than it will in a manual car," said Wilcox. "Therefore we don’t need the protection systems that are built into contemporary cars. We can just have a shell of any design."

The designer imagined a future where all cars were controlled by computers that would eliminate collisions and accidents, meaning everyday vehicles would no longer need to be designed for safety.

Wilcox proposes that a perfectly safe self-driving car is a car that can be made out of something as fragile as glass and used as, in the case of this prototype, a sleeper car. It contains a cozy bed in which the rider can sleep while being driven to their destination. But there are many other possibilities besides a mobile bedroom. Liberated from the responsibility of driving, people could have cars that served as mobile offices, gyms, dining rooms, or lounges. The only limits are your imagination and, of course, your budget.

In addition to unveiling this daring prototype, Wilcox also launched a concept website, called TaxiRobot, where users can customize and order their own driverless cars for a variety of functions and featuring all sorts creative exterior designs.

Click here to watch a video about Dominic Wilcox and his stained-glass driverless car.

Photos by Sylvain Deleu

Head over to Dezeen for additional information about this fabulous futuristic concept car.

Houston, TX-based artist Nikita DevilxKat Leigh of Midian Craftworks created this awesome stained glass Stormtrooper Helmet Table Lamp. Even Emperor Palpatine himself would be impressed with this life-size sculpture made of 521 pieces of hand-cut glass, copper foil, 5-6 lbs of solder and probably some blood, sweat and Jedi tears to boot.

"After the glass was cut, the edges were ground down and each piece was wrapped in copper foil. I then soldered the pieces together, gave the helmet a good cleaning, patinated the solder black, and finally gave everything a nice waxing to polish the metal and make the glass shine! This piece has also been signed and dated.

The helmet itself measures approximately 12 x 12 x12 (inches). Included with the table lamp is a wooden base and a 6 foot lamp cord with a candelabra snap-in socket, rocker switch, and bulb. 40 watt bulbs are the maximum recommended.”

Despite what the top photo depicts, this fantastic piece of home decor isn’t intended to be worn by live humans. It’s quite heavy and fragile, but it does make for an awesome portrait. Currently available for purchase here.

Visit the Midian Craftworks Etsy shop for more geektastic stained glass creations and other crafts perfect for your “Dark & Dork Side.”

[via Technabob]

Dutch street painter Leon Keer (previously featured here) recently spent three days in the city of Nijmegen in the eastern Netherlands creating a new piece of awesome anamorphic art for an international drawing festival called The Big Draw. Although it doesn’t seem like it when viewing it from the front, this painting measures about 15 meters (~50 ft) long.

It depicts a little girl sitting in an empty trunk playing make-believe with her dog friend. The illusion is so convincing that, the first time we looked at the top photo, we didn’t realize the second girl perched on the inside of the lid of the trunk is a live person posing with the artwork and not part of the actual painting.

[via Leon Keer]

Science + Art = Awesome!

Today the Department of Microscopic Marvels explores the exquisitely beautiful art of arranging Diatoms, tiny unicellular algae encased in jewel-like glass shells, into complex kaleidoscopic displays, some of which date back to the Victorian era. They’re works of art that are invisible to the naked eye and must be viewed under a microscope.

Ranging in size from 2 to 200 micrometers, diatoms are among the smallest organisms on the planet. They’re a form of phytoplankton and scientists estimate that there are roughly 100,000 existent species. To create the lovely and astonishingly tiny displays pictured above, diatoms must be found, captured, cleaned, organized and then finally positioned into aesthetically pleasing arrangements in microscope slides.

So how is all of this accomplished? English filmmaker Matthew Killip contacted Diatom specialist and master micromanipulator Klaus Kemp in order to find out. Kemp has dedicated his life to studying and perfecting this microscopic Victorian art form and Killip sat down with him to learn about the process of creating diatom arrangements. The result was a short film entitled The Diatomist.

Click here to watch and learn.

[via Colossal]

Artist Lara Hawker lives in Auckland, New Zealand where she’s taught herself how to paint faces and bodies with awesome results that range from delightful to outright terrifying. That cute little kitty clearly isn’t a fan of Attack on Titan. Hawker recently participated in the Body Art Rocks Convention in Wellington, NZ where she won the Advanced Face Art category with this amazing animorph piece.

Head over to Lara’s DeviantART page or follow her here on Tumblr larahawker to check out more of her fantastic body painting.

[via Neatorama and Laughing Squid]

Awesome Anamorphic Artwork isn’t restricted to walls, floors and sketchbooks. There’s a whole amazing subset that, instead of having the viewer stand in just the right spot, requires looking at flat image or sculpture reflected in a cylindrical mirror in order to see it properly.

Last month the folks at Bored Panda assembled a fascinating collection of 23 examples of this mind-bending art form. Here you see pieces by István Orosz, Jonty Hurwitz, Vera Bugatti and Awtar Singh Virdi respectively.

Click here to view the entire post.

[via Bored Panda]

French art director and illustrator Troqman makes clever use of both his pens and his sketchbooks as well as his surroundings in order to create entertaining drawings of characters appearing to interact with the real world. Our favorite pieces involve characters on multiple pages or sketchbooks interacting with each other as well as the 3D world. And then there’s Spider-Man who think’s he just found his long-lost father.

Troqman calls this playful hobby Cartoon Bombing and you can see a lot more of it over o Instagram or right here on Tumblr at troqman.

[via Bored Panda]

Korean artist Seung Mo Park (previously featured here) continues to develop and perfect his ability to create awesomely photorealistic sculptures using stainless steel wire mesh. Numerous layers of wire appear to form a holographic shadow world from which hauntingly beautiful faces and figures emerge.

"If you gaze at Park’s work for long enough, it almost seems as though he has dialed into some special channel caught between realities. A slight turn to the right and maybe his subject will become a real boy once and for all. A slight turn to the left and these ghostly figures might be subsumed forever."

Park’s sculptures appear so lifelike that it feels like it would only be mildly startling to see one of his faces or figures suddenly move, their eyes locking with our own, perhaps about to speak. We love how the wire mesh frays around the edges of some of the pieces, as though that’s where Park’s shadow world gives way to our own.

Visit Beautiful/Decay to view more of Seung Mo Park’s recent work.

Indian sand sculptor Sudarsan Pattinaik and 30 of his students created a massive installation depicting 500 Santas or ‘Sand-tas’ on the beach behind Panthanivas hotel in Puri, Odisha, India. Created in December 2012, the piece required nearly 5000 tons of sand and took about 4 days to complete. Intended to raise awareness about global warming, the displaced Santas were sculpted along with one large sand sculpture of Jesus and the message “Go green, save Earth.”

“I always try to give some awareness messages through my sculpture to the world, so I chose the awareness about global warming through Santas as the subject at the year end,” Pattnaik told the India Education Diary.

[via Inhabitat and Design Taxi]

Last week we featured a selection of exquisite works of cut paper art by a Japanese Kirie artist named Akira Nagaya. Today we learned that Nagaya also creates awesome cut-out depictions of beloved Anime, manga, cartoon and comic book characters using individual Post-it notes.

Visit Akira Nagaya’s Facebook page to view more of his playful pop culture Post-it cut-outs.

[via Spoon & Tamago]