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3338 posts tagged Art

Ramona, CA-based LEGO builder Ryan Rubino created this tentacularly awesome LEGO diorama entitled Predator & Prey: Battle of the Leviathans.

"One of the most fascinating forms of predation in the natural world has never been seen by man but is often depicted in art. The contest of survival between the Sperm Whale (Physeter macrocephalus) and one of its favorite preys the Giant Squid (Architeuthis dux) has long been of interest to me.”

This awesome piece of LEGO art is featured in the upcoming book Beautiful LEGO 2: Dark [pre-order on Amazon] by Mike Doyle, author and amazing LEGO artist (previously featured here). It’s a 325 page collection of dark LEGO masterpieces created by 140 LEGO enthusiasts from around the world. The works range from nightmarish and creepy to black humor to sculptures of dark chocolate. It’s the sequel to Doyle first and wildly popular LEGO book, Beautiful LEGO [Buy on Amazon].
Head over to Colossal to preview more pieces from Beautiful LEGO 2: Dark.

Ramona, CA-based LEGO builder Ryan Rubino created this tentacularly awesome LEGO diorama entitled Predator & Prey: Battle of the Leviathans.

"One of the most fascinating forms of predation in the natural world has never been seen by man but is often depicted in art. The contest of survival between the Sperm Whale (Physeter macrocephalus) and one of its favorite preys the Giant Squid (Architeuthis dux) has long been of interest to me.”

This awesome piece of LEGO art is featured in the upcoming book Beautiful LEGO 2: Dark [pre-order on Amazon] by Mike Doyle, author and amazing LEGO artist (previously featured here). It’s a 325 page collection of dark LEGO masterpieces created by 140 LEGO enthusiasts from around the world. The works range from nightmarish and creepy to black humor to sculptures of dark chocolate. It’s the sequel to Doyle first and wildly popular LEGO book, Beautiful LEGO [Buy on Amazon].

Head over to Colossal to preview more pieces from Beautiful LEGO 2: Dark.

Oh yeah! Duffman is here to refill your beer and satisfy your sweet tooth.

Spring Hill, FL-based artist Mallory Mae of ButterWinks created this awesomely elaborate Duffman iced butter cooke in the style of Czech Art Nouveau painter Alphonse Mucha. All of that glorious icing illustration was done by hand.

The cookie was created for Simpsononymous, a collaborative, Simpsons-themed edible art project celebrating the 25th anniversary of The Simpsons.

Click here to view more Simpsononymous creations.

[via Between the Pages]

Berlin, Germany-based fine art photographer and psychologist Markus Studtmann takes striking architectural photos that he later digitally deconstructs and recomposes to create awesome architectural illusions. He describes this process as Painting with Light:

"Although light and colors are captured with the camera, they were afterwards repainted in the digital darkroom in order to fit the artist’s vision and impressions. This results in unique images which extend beyond the realm of the camera and often resemble paintings or graphics."

Head over to Markus Studtmann’s 500px page to check out more of his dramatic and surreal cityscapes.

[via Scene360]

70-year-old Xu Shuquan is a retired primary school teacher from the city of Chengdu in Sichuan province who has spent the past 60 years practicing Zhezhi, the traditional Chinese art of paper folding. Shugan has been folding paper planes since he was 10 years old and has amassed an awesome collection of 10,000 paper planes of various sizes, shapes and colors. Unlike Japanese origami, which primarily focuses on creating animals and flowers, Chinese paper folding concentrates mainly on objects, such as boats, hats, or in this case, airplanes.

…Xu put his knowledge of Zhezhi to good use during his teaching career: “When children were naughty or not paying attention, I would get their attention by folding a simple paper dart with a message on it and flying it to them,” he said. “The planes got more and more complicated and the children seemed to love them.” The trick would backfire at times because his students loved the planes so much that they would create a ruckus on purpose.

Shuquan hopes to hold an exhibition of his Zhezhi creations in hopes of reviving an art form which he feels has been eclipsed in the western world by Japanese origami.

“My biggest hope is to hold my own exhibition where people can learn more about the traditional art.”

[via Oddity Central]

Lithuanian artist and craftsman Vainius Kubilius transforms coconut shells into radiant jewels that cast dazzling patterns of light and shadow in every direction. Kubilius’ awesome handmade lamps are called Nymphs and each one is unique. Made of coconut, cork and suede, they have a wonderfully organic feel.

To create his illuminated coconuts, Kubilius carefully shaves and waxes each hollowed out shell. Then comes the painstaking process of drilling thousands of holes in intricate patterns, much like the amazing eggshell art we’ve featured here in the past. The lamp stands are wrapped in layers of suede and varnished cork.

Kubilius makes each lamp by hand in Vilnius, Lithuania, but something tells us that if you found the right map hidden in the false bottom of an old trunk at that one flea market, it might lead you to the secret grove where these radiant creatures grow. And when you aren’t looking they communicate with each other by intertwining their bodies and moving their coconut shell heads to alter the patterns and intensity of light and shadow. It’s just a hunch.

Visit the Nymphs Workshop website, Facebook page or Etsy shop to check out more of Vanius Kubilius’ enchanting Nymph lamps.

[via Bored Panda]

Today the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders shares the extraordinarily small and intricate creations of Satoshi Araki, an artist based in Tokyo who painstakingly crafts miniature dioramas of towns, vehicles, and particularly cityscapes altered by urban decay and warfare. The level of realism and detail that Araki achieves on a 1/35 scale is astonishing.

"On his blog he explains that his primary tool for visual reference is google image search. Keywords like “Iraq war” and “Iraq ruins” (he warns that these search terms can also turn up some gruesome images) help him create scenes that are immensely life-like, even down to the smallest of details…”

But wait, these complex miniature scenes become even more impressive when you learn that Araki’s primary medium is Styrofoam board, cut down (way, way down) to the desired size and shape and then painted with tremendous care and attention to detail. For a diorama depicting a bombed-out corner in Baghdad, Araki made tiny beer and soda cans with labels written in Arabic. The last step is to glue everything together.

Follow Satoshi Araki’s blog or Twitter feed to check out more of his amazing creations.

[via Spoon & Tamago and RocketNews24]

Montreal based artist Mathieu Connery (aka 500M) spent last May through July painting 10 awesome abstract geometric murals on the sidewalks of the city for the second edition of Montreal’s MURAL festival. The festival was officially located along the the Saint-Laurent Boulevard, which is where Connery spray-painted one of his trademark minimalist geometric pieces per week for 10 weeks. When viewed from above they appear to be 3D, turning the urban landscape into a colorful playground and inviting passersby to interact with the art as they move through the city.

[via Beautiful/Decay and Vandalog]

American humorous illustrator Rodney Pike has undertaken an awesomely silly project. He’s been using his Photoshop skills to insert the singularly goofy face of British entertainer Rowan Atkinson in character as Mr. Bean into a variety of portraits by the Old Masters. Judging by the lacy panties held in the hands of Thomas Howard (top image), painted by Hans Holbein the Younger in 1539, Pike sometimes tinkers with more than the faces in the portraits.

If it weren’t for the befuddled expression forever worn on Mr. Bean’s face, these images could be a taste of additional series of Blackadder we’ve always wanted.

Pike says he plans to complete 30 pieces for his Mr. Bean Collection, so keep an eye on his website or DeviantArt page for additional pieces.

[via Ego-AlterEgo]

It’s high time we inaugurated the Department of Awesome Papercraft. We’ll cut the big red ribbon with these exquisite insects made of reclaimed paper. They were created for the IGEPA Benelux paper company by Soon, a Belgium-based ad agency.

The beautifully detailed bugs are part of a graphic language used in a brochure announcing a new brand of recycled paper. They were created by graphic designers Phoebe De Corte and Dries Caeckebeke, led by creative director Jim Van Raemdonck.

Click here for a making-of video to see just how much work went into creating these lovely paper critters.

[via Colossal]