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3280 posts tagged Art

We’ve all become locked into staring contests with these awesome paintings by Taiwanese artist Chang Chia-Ying. Really, we can’t look away.

"Her Russian doll-like portraits of animals and chubby children stare into the distance with hollow, glazed over expressions on their faces. Likewise, the viewer is invited to look through them; their torsos are a window into an alternate reality. They are surrounded by mysterious fairytale gardens, inspired by the cartoons Chia-Ying watched as a child."

Less talk, more staring contests with mesmerizing painted monkeys! You may need to come help us look away or at least bring over some snacks and join in. If enough of us stare back at these beguiling characters, one of them is sure to blink soon. Right?

Visit Chang Chia-Ying’s website to check out more of her dreamy, hypnotic paintings.

[via Hi-Fructose]

Cammi Upton is an artist and self-proclaimed “cryptofluffologist” who creates awesomely detailed hand-embroidered movie monsters. Her process is incredibly painstaking, but the fantastically ghastly results she achieves groan growl howl speak for themselves.

I start by blocking out the piece in a few different colors of felt and then I cover the entire piece in stitches with sewing and embroidery thread. It’s an extremely time consuming process since I do it all by hand. I bring them with me everywhere in the hopes that I’ll get a chance to work on them!

Head over to Cammi Upton’s website or follow her Instagram account to check out more of her monstrous art and other works of Cryptofluff.

[via Make:Craft]

These awesome illuminated inflatable white rabbits are the work of Australian artist Amanda Parer for an installation entitled Intrude. In May 2014 the giant glowing bunnies were installed at the Vivid Festival of Light Sydney and next month they’ll be part of the Junction Arts Festival in Launceston, Tasmania.

Parer’s enormous and radiant rabbits, which stand 7 meters (~23 feet) tall, were created as a twofold response to the animals’ common occurrence in Australian fairytales as well as their invasive presence throughout Australia:

"These animals first travelled to Australia on the ships of the First Fleet and were brought ashore in cages in January 1788. These adaptable creatures quickly made themselves at home and eventually spread to almost every corner of the land. An Australian contradiction, Intrude represents the fairy-tale animals of our childhood – a furry innocence, frolicking through idyllic fields, while revealing their more serious and large-scale effect on the environment.”

Click here for additional images.

[via Lost At E Minor]

The leaf pictured at the top of this post isn’t a leaf at all. It’s made of paper and is an exquisite example of the Japanese art of papercutting is called Kirie (切り絵, meaning ‘cut paper’). All of the extraordinarily delicate examples of the Kirie seen here were handmade by a self-taught Japanese artist named Akira Nagaya, whose skills were first discovered about 30 years ago while he was working in a sushi shop.

"One of his first tasks was to learn sasabaran, a technique to create decorations by cutting slices into bamboo leaves. Back at home, and recalling his boss’s demonstration, Nagaya tried to practice using paper and a utility knife. He found that the technique came quite naturally, and he enjoyed doing it.”

Years later Nagaya was still making his intricate paper objects when he opened his very own restaurant and decided to display his kirie “for fun.” When a local newspaper showed up to review his restaurant they spotted his creations and encouraged him to display them in a gallery.

“That was the first time I even considered what I had been doing as art,” recalls Nagaya.

Head over to Akira Nagaya’s Facebook page to check out many more of his marvelous cut paper creations.

[via Spoon & Tamago]

The Department of Microscopic Marvels is in awe of the work by photomicrographer Danny Sanchez, who specifically seeks out and photographs precious gems that have been rejected by jewelers because of imperfections known as inclusions. In gemology an inclusion is a characteristic enclosed within the gemstone, which can effect the clarity of the stone, and whose presence can either decrease or sometimes dramatically increase the stone’s value.

For his project, entitled Gemstone Inclusions, Sanches uses his microphotography skills to capture the beauty of these imperfections and provide a glimpse of the fantastic and alien landscapes that exist inside the gems, much too small for our eyes to see unaided. Each a teeny weeny Fortress of Solitude.

Head over to PetaPixel to learn about how Danny Sanchez stages and creates these marvelous photos. Then be sure to visit his own website to get a look at more of his work at a much higher resolution. He has prints available too.

[via Design Taxi and PetaPixel]

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.

Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.

My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.

[via Design Taxi]

Gold Insecta Lamp, 2013 by Choe U-Ram from U-Ram Choe on Vimeo.

This awesome metal creature, called the Gold Insecta Lamp, is the work of South Korean artist U-Ram Choe. It’s a delicate and wondrous biomorphic kinetic sculpture that functions as a lamp. Although it looks like a magical object, the device is made of metal, magnets, machinery, electronics and LEDs. Choe made an equally beautiful silver version as well.

Visit U-Ram Choe’s website to explore more of his otherworldly creations.

[via Faith is Torment]

A few months ago we shared some of S. Morita’s photos of Japan’s beautifully decorated manhole covers. In Japan there’s an official Society of Manhole Covers and this sort of urban beautification is a municipal responsibility. Today we learned that even though China has no such system in place, a 24-year-old art graduate named Hu Yifan is taking it upon himself to decorate the manhole covers in his neighborhood. So far Yifan has painted over 30 manhole covers in the Xiaodian district of Taiyuan, capital of Northwest China’s Shanxi province. Sometimes he simply paints a fun, colorful image on the cover, while other times he uses the covers to create larger pieces on the street. China is an enormous country with countless manhole covers, so we hope this is just the beginning of a delightful decoration process.

Photos by Wu Junjie/ China News Service

[via RocketNews24 and China News Service]

Portuguese street artist Bordalo II (previously featured here) is back in his hometown of Lisbon where he used scrap metal, found objects, urban detritus and vibrant paint to create this awesome “Space Grasshopper" installation.

Visit Bordalo II’s website and Instagram account to check out more of his marvelous mixed media creations.

[via StreetArtNews]

Check out these awesomely cute and sleepy pieces of topiary in the Jardin des Plantes de Nantes, a botanical garden located in Nantes, France. Created by French artist and children’s book author Claude Ponti, they’re part of the “Journey to Nantes" (Le Voyage à Nantes) art festival. These delightful topiary sculptures are just one stop on the festival’s 10-mile-long trail of public artwork on display throughout Nantes.

Photos by Molaire & Tentacules, Les petits nantais, Jean-Sebastian Evrard and Big City Life Nantes respectively. (The sleepy bird in the bottom image is from the 2013 festival.)

[via Neatorama]