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547 posts tagged Awesome

Some things are so awesomely enormous that it’s difficult to grasp just how big they are until they’re put into a more relatable perspective. Today, thanks to Belgian amateur astronomer Michel (@quark1972), we get to appreciate the size of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (aka the rubber ducky comet).
This is the comet that the ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft reached on August 6, 2014 after a ten year, five month and four day-long journey nearly 4 million miles into space. The Rosetta will now spend the next two years studying the comet, including the deployment of a lander, the Philae, down to the comet’s surface.
Head over to the ESA website to learn lots more about this amazing mission.
[via io9]

Some things are so awesomely enormous that it’s difficult to grasp just how big they are until they’re put into a more relatable perspective. Today, thanks to Belgian amateur astronomer Michel (@quark1972), we get to appreciate the size of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (aka the rubber ducky comet).

This is the comet that the ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft reached on August 6, 2014 after a ten year, five month and four day-long journey nearly 4 million miles into space. The Rosetta will now spend the next two years studying the comet, including the deployment of a lander, the Philae, down to the comet’s surface.

Head over to the ESA website to learn lots more about this amazing mission.

[via io9]

Regular loaves of bread are so boring compared to these awesomely unsettling loaves perfectly shaped to resemble giant stag beetles. According to the folks at RocketNews24, the bread is labeled as “kuwagata, which means ‘stag beetle’ in Japanese” and it only costs 280 yen (US$2.74) per giant bread beetle. That sounds like a bargain to us.
These insectoid loaves were photographed by Japanese Twitter user tono_donoyukko who said, “I wanted to introduce this shocking bread I found yesterday.” We’re so glad she did. Now we can’t stop thinking about all the situations in which we’d enjoy eating freaky beetle bread.
[via RocketNews24]

Regular loaves of bread are so boring compared to these awesomely unsettling loaves perfectly shaped to resemble giant stag beetles. According to the folks at RocketNews24, the bread is labeled as “kuwagata, which means ‘stag beetle’ in Japanese” and it only costs 280 yen (US$2.74) per giant bread beetle. That sounds like a bargain to us.

These insectoid loaves were photographed by Japanese Twitter user tono_donoyukko who said, “I wanted to introduce this shocking bread I found yesterday.” We’re so glad she did. Now we can’t stop thinking about all the situations in which we’d enjoy eating freaky beetle bread.

[via RocketNews24]

Rosemary Mosco, field naturalist and artist responsible for the creator of the webcomic bird and moon (previously featured here) just shared this delightful illustration that we love because it’s a terrific reminder of everyday awesomeness that’s all around us.

A year ago I got to illustrate one of the endings in Ryan North’s brilliant Hamlet choose-your-own-path book To Be or Not To Be. These are all things you may be able to find outside right now (if you can bear to put down this amazing book).

Rosemary Mosco, field naturalist and artist responsible for the creator of the webcomic bird and moon (previously featured here) just shared this delightful illustration that we love because it’s a terrific reminder of everyday awesomeness that’s all around us.

A year ago I got to illustrate one of the endings in Ryan North’s brilliant Hamlet choose-your-own-path book To Be or Not To Be. These are all things you may be able to find outside right now (if you can bear to put down this amazing book).

Reblogged from birdandmoon

Comic book artist and illustrator Benjamin Dewey (previously featured here) created this wonderful cut-out craft project to help instantly transform any scene you encounter into something awesome.
Dewey is the mastermind behind the wonderfuly tragic and tragically wonderful Tragedy Series webcomic. If you’re unfamiliar with it we highly recommend checking out.
via tragedyseries:

It was nice to meet some of you at SDCC. This craft-project would have bee useful at times during that humid span of days. I recommend printing out on sturdy stock!

Comic book artist and illustrator Benjamin Dewey (previously featured here) created this wonderful cut-out craft project to help instantly transform any scene you encounter into something awesome.

Dewey is the mastermind behind the wonderfuly tragic and tragically wonderful Tragedy Series webcomic. If you’re unfamiliar with it we highly recommend checking out.

via tragedyseries:

It was nice to meet some of you at SDCC. This craft-project would have bee useful at times during that humid span of days. I recommend printing out on sturdy stock!

Reblogged from tragedyseries

Today the Department of Awesome Parenting salutes this deep sea cephalopod supermom who spent four years and five months vigilantly guarding her brood of eggs until they hatched. This 53 month period is double the longest known brooding time ever seen in the animal kingdom.

The discovery, published in the journal PLOS One, was made in a canyon 1.4km beneath the Pacific, off California. Dr Bruce Robison led the research at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). He told BBC News his team had stumbled upon the plucky mother in the days before she settled down and glued her eggs to the rock face. She was heading, slowly, for a known brooding site.

Characteristic scars on the octopus enabled the team to identify her one month later when they spotted her a second time, now with a new clutch of eggs.

"The first time that we dropped back down… and realised that she had gone up and laid a clutch of eggs, it was very exciting," Dr Robison said. "We knew that we had the beginning. No-one had ever had the good fortune to come upon the beginning of a brooding period."

The team paid 18 additional visits over a 4.5 year period to check on the devoted mama octopus using their robotic submarine. Once a female octopus has laid her eggs, she spends the rest of her life protecting them. She doesn’t eat during this period, which means she slowly weakens as her eggs develop. Shortly after the eggs hatch, her magnum opus completed, she dies.

When Dr Robison’s team visited the site for what would be the last time, they found only empty egg cases. The brood had successfully hatched and their faithful mum had gone. Take a moment to think back over all the last 4.5 years of your life and consider that during that entire period this incredible mama octopus was doing one awesome thing.

Head over to BBC News to learn more.

[via BBC News and PLOS One]

Some numbers are so big that they defy comprehension. So just in case you’ve ever wondered to yourself ‘What does it look like when 8 million flower petals fall on a Costa Rican village?’ Thanks to Sony, who launched a spectacular volley of 3.5 tons of colorful petals to create a promo for their new Ultra HD TVs, now we know. It looks awesome. It looks like a scene from a fairytale or a glimpse into someone’s beautiful dream.

"Organised by international advertising agency McCann, the idea was to cover the area near the Irazú Volcano – located in central Costa Rica – with a flower petal for every pixel in Sony’s 4K Ultra HD TV. McCann enlisted photographer Nick Meek and filmmaker Jaron Albertin to capture the colourful explosion.”

Visit Yellowtrace to watch the actual video and then click here for Sony’s behind-the-scenes video to learn how they did it using almost no digital trickery.

[via Yellowtrace]

Let’s pay a visit to the Department of Awesomely Good Deeds where we’ll watch this surprising POV video. Utah motorcyclist Bossaucey was out for a ride when he noticed an SUV in the adjacent lane driving with a coffee mug on its bumper. Bossaucey not only caught up to the vehicle and retrieved the mug, he also pulled up alongside the driver and returned it. Good deed accomplished!

[via Laughing Squid]

Why yes, these are photos of President Obama shaking hands with someone wearing one of our Horse Head Masks. This awesomely surreal moment occurred on Tuesday night, July 8, 2014, as the President was greeting people along the streets of downtown Denver, CO. The first photo was taken by Jewel Samad and the second by New York Times photographer Doug Mills.

Of course, it didn’t take long for The Internets to react in hilarious fashion, which is how we arrive at the amazing third photo.

Visit BuzzFeed for additional images.

[via the LA Times and BuzzFeed]

Macabre baking maven Annabel de Vetten of Conjurer’s Kitchen (previously featured here) created this deliciously gruesome dissected cake in response to frequently being asked what’s inside her elaborately decorated cakes and what they taste like:

"Of course only the pretty cakes look like this on the inside, all the creepy and unusual cakes are yummy sponge cakes in many different flavours! ;-)

OK, so I’m kidding. Everything is tasty.”

[via Conjurer’s Kitchen]

Nature + Science + Art = Super Awesome!

These amazing gifs, created from a video by Jonathon Bird’s Blue World, show a diver releasing a non-toxic fluorescent dye at the base of different sponges in the Caribbean to beautifully demonstrate how they feed on microscopic plankton by pumping and filtering the water through their bodies.

Click here to watch the actual video.

[via the io9 Observation Deck and reefs.com]