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31 posts tagged Bear

Japanese paper artist Nahoko Kojima (previously featured here) recently unveiled her latest work of paper art at the Jerwood Space in London. Entitled Byaku (Japanese for White), this awesomely delicate and intricate piece is a life-sized depiction of a swimming polar bear. It was made using a single 3m x 3m sheet of white Washi paper.

"Before she started to cut the animal figure, she crumpled the paper by hand to give it an uneven texture, creating a more faceted form than the smooth surface would have allowed.

The artist revealed to Designboom that she, ‘chose this particular Washi because it has less then 100% Kouzo content and this means that it subtly turns warmer in colour over time – this mimics the fur of the polar bear which based on my research goes through a similar change over the span of its life.’”

The ends of the bear’s fur form shapes of carp and waves, enhancing the appearance that the animal is swimming through water. Byaku hangs from the gallery ceiling and spotlights positioned overhead cast shadows onto a white plinth below, creating swirling patterns like reflections on water.

[via Designboom]

Yago Partal, a graphic artist based in Barcelona, has created an awesome photo series entitled Zoo Portraitsdepicting a wide variety of animals who all share two things in common: they like dressing up in stylish clothing and posing for fashion portraits.

There are lots of different animals in the series and you can purchase prints of the photos via Yago’s online shop. We love each and every one of them.

[via HiConsumption]

These mustachioed animals are the work of Dutch creative agency 180 Amsterdam. “Tame The Beast” is an ad campaign for Barber, a shaving salon located in Amsterdam. These delightful images demonstrate yet again that, no matter how awesome someone already is, they look even better with a great mustache.

[via Design Taxi]

When you look at this photo you might assume that you’re seeing a man on an airplane seated beside a big plush panda. But guess what, that’s not a toy. That’s a real live panda cub and he’s flying first class.


"China Airlines is a proud corporate sponsor of the panda sanctuary at Cheng Du and was happy to help out recently with the transfer of a young panda cub to a zoo in the United States of America.
After extensive consultation with the Sanctuary’s veterinary staff it was concluded that the importance of the panda cub precluded it from traveling in the hold of the aircraft, where attending to its needs would be difficult. Thus China Airlines agreed to donate seats in its Business Traveler First cabin for the panda cub named Squee Squee and his carer, Fu Jiang Lang, seen here sitting in the window seat.”


We hope Squee Squee enjoyed his flight.
[via BuzzFeed]

When you look at this photo you might assume that you’re seeing a man on an airplane seated beside a big plush panda. But guess what, that’s not a toy. That’s a real live panda cub and he’s flying first class.

"China Airlines is a proud corporate sponsor of the panda sanctuary at Cheng Du and was happy to help out recently with the transfer of a young panda cub to a zoo in the United States of America.

After extensive consultation with the Sanctuary’s veterinary staff it was concluded that the importance of the panda cub precluded it from traveling in the hold of the aircraft, where attending to its needs would be difficult. Thus China Airlines agreed to donate seats in its Business Traveler First cabin for the panda cub named Squee Squee and his carer, Fu Jiang Lang, seen here sitting in the window seat.”

We hope Squee Squee enjoyed his flight.

[via BuzzFeed]

Source BuzzFeed

A jack rabbit in process of restoration. Taxidermist George Dante touches up one of the Alaskan brown bears in the Hall of North American Mammals. The standing bear in this diorama is more than 8 feet tall. Stephen Quinn, the senior project manager in the AMNH’s exhibition department, works on restoring the wolf diorama, which sets a scene from Gunflint Lake in Minnesota. A coyote before and after the restoration. A pronghorn before and after the restoration. A bison bull before and after the restoration. A ferret before and after the restoration.

The incredibly awesome American Museum of Natural History in New York City has undertaken an awesome restoration project that, after a year of painstaking work, is finally nearing its conclusion:

The AMNH’s Hall of North American Mammals first opened in 1942, is in the final stages of a year-long restoration. Artists, taxidermists, conservators and designers have been working on everything from re-coloring faded fur and restoring paintings to dusting leaves and installing new energy-efficient and less-damaging lighting. The display text for each diorama will be updated with the latest scientific information about each species.

The Hall will reopen on Oct. 27, on the 154th birthday of Theodore Roosevelt, along with the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial, which was dedicated in 1936.

So, while we’re still waiting on the invention of time travel (which would enable us to go back and see the AMNH’s amazing dioramas in person when they were brand new), it will soon be a better time than ever to finally take a trip to New York that includes a long, leisurely visit to the American Museum of Natural History. Maybe we’ll see you there.

[via Wired Science]

Source Wired

Joshua Allen Harris is a New York-based street artist who uses tape and plastic shopping and garbage bags, carefully positioned atop subway grates, to create awesome works of inflatable ephemeral art. Each piece appears to be little more than litter until wind rushes up out of the grate, inflating the bags and thus giving momentary life to Joshua’s plastic creatures. He began with a white bear, and then graduated to gorillas, giraffes, and even centaurs, minotaurs and a sea serpent

We strongly recommend spending some time at Joshua Allen Harris’ Youtube channel where you’ll find numerous videos of his inflatable art coming to life on the streets of New York. Still photos of these pieces are all well and good, but watching them rise up and take shape and then seeing passersby react to them is really something special. 

[via Trendland and Wooster Collective]

Kawaii! We’ve posted some pretty cute food before, but this dish is off the charts. Are you strong enough and hungry enough to eat food this cute?
This is actually the second time we’ve posted a teddy bear omelette. (Here’s the first one) But this time, thanks to Redditor Myself91, we’ve learned that this adorable dish has a name. Rilakkuma Omurice or the “Relaxing Bear Omelette” is made using fried rice and often topped with ketchup. Here’s a recipe along with an instructional video. 
Unfortunately we haven’t been able to figure out who made the specific dish pictured above. If you know, please tell us so we can provide proper credit.
[via Reddit]

Kawaii! We’ve posted some pretty cute food before, but this dish is off the charts. Are you strong enough and hungry enough to eat food this cute?

This is actually the second time we’ve posted a teddy bear omelette. (Here’s the first one) But this time, thanks to Redditor Myself91, we’ve learned that this adorable dish has a name. Rilakkuma Omurice or the “Relaxing Bear Omelette” is made using fried rice and often topped with ketchup. Here’s a recipe along with an instructional video

Unfortunately we haven’t been able to figure out who made the specific dish pictured above. If you know, please tell us so we can provide proper credit.

[via Reddit]

Source reddit.com