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109 posts tagged Birds

This awesome photo shows a wild male Anna’s Hummingbird using his incredibly tiny tongue to lick nectar off a human finger. That finger belongs to Beam Guy, who lives outside Sacramento, California and loves hummingbirds so much that he’s managed to train some to perch on his fingers and drink homemade nectar from a small container that he conceals within his closed hand. He’s even learned to imitate one of their high-pitched calls in order to encourage them to come feed from his hands.
Head over to Laughing Squid for videos of this amazing interaction.

This awesome photo shows a wild male Anna’s Hummingbird using his incredibly tiny tongue to lick nectar off a human finger. That finger belongs to Beam Guy, who lives outside Sacramento, California and loves hummingbirds so much that he’s managed to train some to perch on his fingers and drink homemade nectar from a small container that he conceals within his closed hand. He’s even learned to imitate one of their high-pitched calls in order to encourage them to come feed from his hands.

Head over to Laughing Squid for videos of this amazing interaction.

These cute metal creatures aren’t simply minimal modern sculptures. They’re an awesome series of CCTV cameras created by Italian designer Eleanor Trevisanutto to look like perching animals - squirrels, birds, lizards and insects. They were designed for Parson, an Italian company working to make electronic surveillance less obtrusive and more stylish.

"Each device is encased within layers of brightly coloured, sand-cast aluminium, which resemble a series of tree-dwelling animals. The camera lens on each character is hidden behind a semi-transparent black screen. The cameras attach to a wall via an arm that looks like a tree branch, with electrical cables concealed inside."

Head over to Dezeen for additional images and info.

Norway has just emerged as a challenger for Japan’s title as Masters of Awesome Cuteness. These photos were taken on the set of “Piip-Show”, a live reality tv show following the lives of a cast comprised of wild birds and the occasional squirrel. Conceived by Norwegian freelance photographer Magne Klann, the show takes place on a set which is an outdoor bird feeder modeled after Java, a well-known coffee shop in Oslo, Norway.

“Different personalities meet inside the bar. Among others a short tempered nuthatch, a blue tit with the memory of a gold fish, a happy-go-lucky great tit, and a depressed bullfinch. Like in any other bar there is bickering, petty theft, fighting and attempts at romance”.

We can’t help but try to pair these animals with various cast members from Seinfeld.

Billed as the very first reality show for birds, the “Piip-Show" is a three-month-long project that’s being broadcast live on the Norwegian broadcasting network NRK.

Click here to watch the “Piip-Show” online

[via Junkculture]

Look closely at the top photo, but don’t listen to your brain. It wants to see a Scarlet Macaw parrot perched on a stump, but it’s really a woman disguised by an awesome combination of amazing body painting and careful posing.

This masterful optical illusion is the work of Italian fine-art-bodypainter Johannes Stötter (previously featured here), who spent four weeks painstakingly planning the project.

"It then took him several hours to complete the painting itself, using breathable paint to transform the model’s body into a mind-blowing piece of artwork. After another hour of careful positioning and posing, Stötter snapped the photograph that you see here."

Visit Johannes Stötter’s website to check out more of his incredible artwork.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

British artist Dean Patman has been fascinated by animals ever since he was little. As a child he drew them, but now he uses everyday objects like spoons, forks, teapots and knives to create impressively life-like animal sculptures.

"I’ve always been a little nutty about animals." he says, "At school my teachers soon learnt that the best way to motivate me was to make it about animals. I especially loved being able to draw or model them."

Visit Dean Patman’s website to check out more of his awesome found object animal sculptures.

[via Junkculture]

Street artists Aakash Nihalani (previously featured here) and Know Hope collaborated on this wonderful piece which transforms a flat blue exterior wall in Brooklyn, NY into corner with windows on either side. A flock of paper birds flies in one window and out the other, which reinforces the optical illusion while also suggesting that perhaps these two widows are actually floating in midair.

[via Unurth]

A few weeks ago we shared an amazing video that treated us to a literal bird’s eye view thanks to a GoPro camera strapped on the back of an eagle. Today we get to experience the flight of a bird from a different, but equally awesome perspective. This time, instead of feeling like a bird, it feels like we’re being carried by one.

Meet Bigbird the pelican. After a bad storm he washed up on the beach near Greystoke Mahale, a resort located in Tanzania on Lake Tanganyika. The young bird had been injured and orphaned by the storm. Fortunately Bigbird was taken in and cared for by a group of volunteers.

But that’s not all they did.

As you’ll see in this incredibly uplifting video, shared by GoPro, the volunteers also helped teach him how to fly. Now, thanks to the small camera which was strapped to his great big pelican beak, we get to experience Bigbird’s very first flight right along with him.

[via Geekologie and Discovery News]

Artist Rebecca Jewell uses a painstaking process involving a photo-plate, ink, an etching press and ethically-sourced feathers to create these beautiful and incredibly delicate works of art. Her creations are inspired by the native birds and feather artifacts that she first encountered living in New Guinea for a year in 1982. It was there that she learned how important both the birds and their feathers are to the native people and saw the amazing headdresses that they made.

"Of the pieces she says: ‘Over the past years I have drawn and painted feathers and birds, and explored how they have been used to enhance and decorate humans. I am also aware of the plight and precarious status of many species, which I wanted to represent in the delicacy of the image on the feather.’"

Rebecca is now an artist in residence at the British Museum, Department of Africa, Oceania and the Americas where she “creates work that explores the shared histories between people that create certain artifacts, the explorers, anthropologists and travelers who obtain them, and the museums that house them.”

Visit Rebecca Jewell’s website to check out lots more of her amazing artwork.

[via Beautiful/Decay]

The speckled egg in this hypnotic gif is demonstrating an amazing evolutionary advancement. It’s a strangely pointy egg and it belongs to a Common Murre or Guillemot, a seabird that congregates in large colonies on rocky cliff shores and does not make nests. Instead the birds lay their eggs directly on bare rock ledges. And that’s one of the reasons their eggs have evolved such an unusual shape - so that when they roll, instead of rolling away from their parents and into the sea, they roll in a tight little circle. It’s further proof that nature is awesome.
Head over to io9 to learn more about Guillemots and their wonderfully unusual eggs.
[via io9]

The speckled egg in this hypnotic gif is demonstrating an amazing evolutionary advancement. It’s a strangely pointy egg and it belongs to a Common Murre or Guillemot, a seabird that congregates in large colonies on rocky cliff shores and does not make nests. Instead the birds lay their eggs directly on bare rock ledges. And that’s one of the reasons their eggs have evolved such an unusual shape - so that when they roll, instead of rolling away from their parents and into the sea, they roll in a tight little circle. It’s further proof that nature is awesome.

Head over to io9 to learn more about Guillemots and their wonderfully unusual eggs.

[via io9]