It’s always an awe-inspiring pleasure to visit the Department of Awesome Macro Photography. Today we discover the work of Linden Gledhill, a biochemist and photographer who takes extraordinary macro photos of moth and butterfly wings.

Using a fully-automated macro focusing rail created by Cognisys, Gledhill creates amazing hi-res images that magnify the surfaces of insect wings 7 to 10 times life-size. His photos reveal the many incredible colors and textures of the individual scales that make up the insects’ remarkable wings. In the second photo we can even see a single grain of pollen on a butterfly’s wing.

Head over to Linden Gledhill’s Flickr stream to view more of his astonishing and beautiful macro photos.

[via Design Taxi]

Proving once again that Science + Art = Awesome: This strangely beautiful and luminous spiral structure is a butterfly tongue (or proboscis) magnified 60x.
The photo was taken by Kata Kenesei and Barbara Orsolits from the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Experimental Medicine in Szeged, Hungary.
It’s from the Nikon Small World photomicrography competition for 2013. Click here to view more awesome entries from the competition.
[via TYWKIWDBI]

Proving once again that Science + Art = Awesome: This strangely beautiful and luminous spiral structure is a butterfly tongue (or proboscis) magnified 60x.

The photo was taken by Kata Kenesei and Barbara Orsolits from the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Experimental Medicine in Szeged, Hungary.

It’s from the Nikon Small World photomicrography competition for 2013. Click here to view more awesome entries from the competition.

[via TYWKIWDBI]

It’s been at least a month since we last shared some examples of awesome origami, which is just about too long. Vietnamese paper artist Nguyễn Hùng Cường lives and works in Hanoi uses a special Vietnamese handmade paper called Dó to create his impressively dynamic origami pieces.

"Cường tells All Things Paper that he began folding around the age of five or six and although his work has been featured in numerous popular books on origami, he has not yet made it his full-time career.”

Visit Nguyễn Hùng Cường’s Flickr page to view many more examples of his amazing folded paper artwork.

[via Colossal]

British artist Claire Moynihan uses a variety of freeform embroidery techniques to create these awesome, itty-bitty sculptural insects perched atop small felt balls. 

“After completing a collection of work Moynihan then organizes the pieces inside traditional entomological boxes which from a distance could almost pass for the real thing.”

Visit Claire’s online gallery to check out more of her wonderful creations.

[via Colossal]

Turkish artist Hasan Kale creates awesome micro paintings on a variety of unexpected surfaces such as the delicate wings of butterfies, beetles, and cicadas, strips of pasta, tiny snail shells, seeds, and coffee beans. While Kale’s canvases differ greatly from each other, they all share one thing in common: each is painted with a miniature landscape of the artist’s beloved hometown, the city of Istanbul.

“Kale uses his finger as a palette to blend paints and to create his desired color palettes. With great patience and a well-trained, steady hand, the artist uses a very fine-tipped paint brush to achieve amazing details. Viewers have to look very closely in order to see and to appreciate the landscapes, which blend very naturally into his chosen, and unusual, backgrounds.”

Click here to watch a brief video of Hasan Kale at work, painting a pumpking seed.

Visit My Modern Metropolis to view more of Hasan’s miniature landscapes.

From the Department of Awesome Optical Illusions comes this fantastic photo entitled Oko, which means “eye” in Croatian. It was taken by Marko Popadic, a photographer based in Merzenich, Germany. The markings on the wing of a butterfly perched on the zygomatic bone of a human skull hauntingly serve as the piercing gaze of the skull’s missing eye.
[via Neatorama]

From the Department of Awesome Optical Illusions comes this fantastic photo entitled Oko, which means “eye” in Croatian. It was taken by Marko Popadic, a photographer based in Merzenich, Germany. The markings on the wing of a butterfly perched on the zygomatic bone of a human skull hauntingly serve as the piercing gaze of the skull’s missing eye.

[via Neatorama]

Amit Drori and Tel Aviv-based designer Noam Dover created an awesome menagerie of robotic animal sculptures, which are powered by servo motors and remote-controlled by puppeteers, for theatrical production entitled Savanna, A Possible Landscape, which premiered in 2011.

Head over to Laughing Squid to watch a couple short videos of the production.

Photos by Noam Dover and Michal Cederbaum