There goes nature being incredibly awesome again. You may think you’re looking at a couple dried leaves, but you aren’t. These astonishing beauties are moths, specifically Uropyia meticulodina, from the family Notodontidae. Found in parts of China and Taiwan, the patterns on their wings mimic dead leaves so convincingly that they are considered to be one of the finest examples of camouflage in the animal kingdom.

Click here to watch brief video footage of Uropyia meticulodina in the wild. You still won’t believe your eyes.

Photos taken by Bettaman and enyagene respectively.

[via io9 and Real Monstrosities]

It’s Nature is Awesome Day on Geyser of Awesome! Celebrating naturally occurring amazements of all kinds…

Artist Johannes Stötter is a fine-art-bodypainter from South Tyrol, Italy who uses his artistry to blend his subjects into their surroundings so well that they all but disappear. His models appear to take on both the colours and textures of their surroundings and sometimes even transform into other creatures or objects, including fruit and vegetables, trees, rocks, and even wildlife.

For example, the photo at the top of this post appears to feature a colourful frog. Look closely and you’ll see that the frog is composed of five different people carefully painted and positioned so that together they become one beautiful amphibian. Click here to watch a video about how it was done.

Head over to My Modern Metropolis to view more examples of Johannes Stötter’s artwork.

[via My Modern Metropolis and Whudat]

It’s time for another astonishing visit the Department of Awesome Camouflage. This time we’re meeting a very special lizard. You can see the lizard in this photo, right? Don’t worry if you didn’t spot him right away. That just means he’s doing his job.
This is a Satanic Leaf-tailed Gecko (Uroplatus phantasticus). Indigenous to the island of Madagascar, these amazing creatures evolved to blend into leafy undergrowth so well that some even have notches in their leaf-shaped tails that make them look even more convincingly like dry, fallen leaves.

""The gecko’s colouration can be brown or grey and it can transform itself into amazing yellow, green, orange and pink hues. Geckos are one of Madagascar’s most unique species. As they sleep flattened against trees of branches with their heads pointing downwards, they can adjust their body coloration to their surroundings.
When at rest laying head down on a mossy or lichen covered branch, geckos are almost impossible to see. The gecko is a master at disguise. Its large eyes help this nocturnal species hunt its prey, large mouths are capable of tackling oversized prey.””

Visit Dailymail.co.uk to learn more about these awesome creatures.
Photo taken at the Andasibe-Mantadia National Park in Madagascar.
[via Environmental Graffiti, Brainz, and Dailymail.co.uk]

It’s time for another astonishing visit the Department of Awesome Camouflage. This time we’re meeting a very special lizard. You can see the lizard in this photo, right? Don’t worry if you didn’t spot him right away. That just means he’s doing his job.

This is a Satanic Leaf-tailed Gecko (Uroplatus phantasticus). Indigenous to the island of Madagascar, these amazing creatures evolved to blend into leafy undergrowth so well that some even have notches in their leaf-shaped tails that make them look even more convincingly like dry, fallen leaves.

""The gecko’s colouration can be brown or grey and it can transform itself into amazing yellow, green, orange and pink hues. Geckos are one of Madagascar’s most unique species. As they sleep flattened against trees of branches with their heads pointing downwards, they can adjust their body coloration to their surroundings.

When at rest laying head down on a mossy or lichen covered branch, geckos are almost impossible to see. The gecko is a master at disguise. Its large eyes help this nocturnal species hunt its prey, large mouths are capable of tackling oversized prey.”

Visit Dailymail.co.uk to learn more about these awesome creatures.

Photo taken at the Andasibe-Mantadia National Park in Madagascar.

[via Environmental Graffiti, Brainz, and Dailymail.co.uk]

From the Department of Awesome Camouflage comes this incredible Portrait of an Eastern Screech Owl taken by photographer Graham McGeorge in the Okefenokee Swamp, located in southern Georgia.
This stunning photo is part of the 2013 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest. (Click the link to view more entries and learn how to enter the contest yourself.)
[via My Modern Metropolis]

From the Department of Awesome Camouflage comes this incredible Portrait of an Eastern Screech Owl taken by photographer Graham McGeorge in the Okefenokee Swamp, located in southern Georgia.

This stunning photo is part of the 2013 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest. (Click the link to view more entries and learn how to enter the contest yourself.)

[via My Modern Metropolis]

Chinese artist Liu Bolin (previously featured here), master of creative camouflage and real-life invisible man, has returned with a new series of photos entitled Hiding in the City, currently on exhibition at the Galerie Paris-Beijing in Paris through March 10, 2013.

If you aren’t already familiar with Liu Bolin's awesome artwork, you should know that there are no post-production tricks used to create these images. The artist is able to hide himself within these urban scenes thanks to a talented team of assistants who reference photos of the areas behind him when painting him from head-to-toe so that he seems to disappear completely into the background, no matter what that background might be. 

“My intention was not to disappear in the environment but instead to let the environment take possession of me”, he says. Bolin’s intent is not to simply hide himself as an individual but suggests the works are statement regarding damage caused by economic and urban development. 

[via My Modern Metropolis and Colossal]

This is video of a particularly awesome little black-marble jawfish mimicking a mimic octopus.

For a good 15 minutes, this black-marble jawfish took the mollusk express, presumably to find food beyond its burrow. As nifty as the fish’s behavior is, the researchers suspect that this isn’t an everyday interaction. From the recent paper in the journal Coral Reefs, “Opportunistic mimicry by a Jawfish”:

Since the Black-Marble Jawfish is distributed from Japan to Australia, whereas the Mimic Octopus is restricted to the Indo-Malay region, we think this is a case of opportunistic rather than obligate mimicry.

[via Geekologie]

Reminiscent of the work of Chinese artist Liu Bolin (previously posted here), make-up artist Carolyn Roper was commissioned to camouflage women using body paint in order to make them blend into London’s urban scenery. In the top photo you see a woman who was painted to disappear amongst the produce on a vegetable stand at London’s Portobello Market. Below that another woman fades into the background sitting on the rear seat of a city bus. 

This was project was created to promote the third season of Covert Affairs, an American TV series about CIA agents and their espionage missions. The new season of Covert Affairs premiered on September 19, 2012 on the UK channel Really.

Visit Huffington Post UK to view the entire image gallery.

Then head over to Laughing Squid to watch an entertaining behind-the-scenes video about how Carolyn Roper made these women disappear into their surroundings.

Source Laughing Squid

Chipwich Harvest and Soft Serve Camo-Bot by Jon Reinfurt

Illustrator Jon Reinfurt created a series of pieces featuring treat-loving robots that are as meaningful as they are cute:

I wanted to explore the theme of “consumption” in a way that would be open for interpretation by the viewer while still having a very deliberate narrative. Since mankind is entirely dependent on the consumption of natural resources in order to both survive and progress, I felt that the tone of the paintings should not be overly negative but should leave room for further meditation on the subject. Like all things in life, this issue is not black or white. It’s too easy to just say that something is wrong without really thinking about how we got to where we are in the first place.

To help the viewer distance themselves from the obvious reactions that would come from seeing oceans of oil and leveled forests, I chose to use colorful robots and delicious ice cream treats to set the stage for my story. That way the audience can decide for themselves whether they want to see these images as a call for conservation or just a fun picture of a robot enjoying a frozen snack.  

Visit BLDG//WLF to view more pieces from this series.

Source bldgwlf.com