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133 posts tagged Candy

Feast your eyes on these awesomely lifelike, 100% edible chocolate kabuto-mushi beetles and chocolate-dipped fruit larvae. Sold in sets of four featuring a Hercules beetle, a stag beetle, and male and female rhino beetles, the beetles were created as a special Valentine’s Day offering back in 2009 at the Namco Namja Town theme park in Tokyo.

We firmly believe that nothing says “I love you” quite like a handful of chocolate creepy-crawlies.

[via Kotaku]

We still haven’t fully recovered from discovering the edible monstrosity that is the World’s Largest Gummy Worm, and yet the nightmarishly awesome potential of gummy candy continues to unleash even bigger creatures. Behold the seemingly endless sugar rush that is that the 26-Pound Edible Gummy Party Python made by Vat19.

"Tipping the scales at nearly 27 pounds, this huge candy snake packs over 36,000 calories into its nearly 8-foot-long frame. Boasting incredible details including intricate eyes, extensive and blended coloring, ridged coils, and thousands of individually carved scales, the Party Python will steal the show at any party."

Should you decide to splurge on this sweet monster serpent, we suggest buying some gummy rats as well to see if the Party Python with eat them before you eat it.

Available here in Blue Raspberry & Green Apple or Red Cherry & Blue Raspberry flavor combinations.

[via Technabob]

Smart people have all kinds of delicious stuff in their heads! Well, now you can eat it. You can get Edgar Allan Poe, William Shakespeare or Sigmund Freud candy in a book-shaped package. Each wrapper has the face of the genius on it. Shakespeare tastes like lemon, Poe is grape and for some mysterious reason Freud reminded us of bananas. Food for thinkers! Looks great on a bookshelf.

Buy them here

Source mcphee.com

It’s never too early to start planning what to offer your neighborhood trick-or-treaters. These remarkably/horrifyingly lifelike gummy grubs and caterpillars would make awesome Halloween treats. Although they may look like they just wriggled out of your nightmares, they’re actually handmade, fruit-filled sweets. They’re made in Japan at Akai Tento no Koohii Ten (The Red Tent Coffee Shop), a small coffee stand located on the east coast of Aomori Prefecture.

We can’t stop staring at these photos, because we’re convinced one of the grubs is about to twitch. Akai Tento is a small business, but these amazingly unsettling creepy-crawly gummy candies have earned the shop nationwide (and now international) attention.

Each of Akai Tento’s gruesome gummies is available to buy individually or in packs (or perhaps that should be clutches?) via Yahoo! Japan Shopping, and cost between 300 and 350 yen (US$2.80-3.20) each.

Photos via Akai Tento and Yahoo! Shopping

[via RocketNews24]

In Japan you can enjoy your favorite anime, cartoon and video game characters as more than simply visual entertainment. They’re also available as sweet treats. These kawaii confections are a form of wagashi (和菓子) called nerikiri (練り切り). Made from white bean paste and rice-based dough, nerikiri are often tinted and molded similar to how marzipan is prepared in Western desserts.

These pop culture-inspired nerikiri were all made by Japanese Twitter user Otakumi at a wagashi shop called Kuramoto Hinode, which is located in the Tokushima Prefecture of Japan’s Shikoku island.

Follow Otakumi’s Twitter feed

You can also try your hand at making your very own nerikiri. Click here for the recipe.

[via Kotaku]

Candy is awesome, but candy that’s made as the result of a lively musical performance is super awesome! This hypnotic video shows a traditional Korean candy cutter using a heavy pair of shears and a trowel to hammer and cut pieces of hobakyeot, a pumpkin-flavored form of Yeot, a traditional Korean confection that’s similar to taffy.

These candy artisans turn what could be a monotonous process, cutting many small pieces from one large block, into a dynamic and engaging performance with a tasty result.

Click here for additional videos of Korean candy cutters in action.

Video posted YouTube user Victoria Nagy.

[via Reddit]