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130 posts tagged Candy

It’s never too early to start planning what to offer your neighborhood trick-or-treaters. These remarkably/horrifyingly lifelike gummy grubs and caterpillars would make awesome Halloween treats. Although they may look like they just wriggled out of your nightmares, they’re actually handmade, fruit-filled sweets. They’re made in Japan at Akai Tento no Koohii Ten (The Red Tent Coffee Shop), a small coffee stand located on the east coast of Aomori Prefecture.

We can’t stop staring at these photos, because we’re convinced one of the grubs is about to twitch. Akai Tento is a small business, but these amazingly unsettling creepy-crawly gummy candies have earned the shop nationwide (and now international) attention.

Each of Akai Tento’s gruesome gummies is available to buy individually or in packs (or perhaps that should be clutches?) via Yahoo! Japan Shopping, and cost between 300 and 350 yen (US$2.80-3.20) each.

Photos via Akai Tento and Yahoo! Shopping

[via RocketNews24]

In Japan you can enjoy your favorite anime, cartoon and video game characters as more than simply visual entertainment. They’re also available as sweet treats. These kawaii confections are a form of wagashi (和菓子) called nerikiri (練り切り). Made from white bean paste and rice-based dough, nerikiri are often tinted and molded similar to how marzipan is prepared in Western desserts.

These pop culture-inspired nerikiri were all made by Japanese Twitter user Otakumi at a wagashi shop called Kuramoto Hinode, which is located in the Tokushima Prefecture of Japan’s Shikoku island.

Follow Otakumi’s Twitter feed

You can also try your hand at making your very own nerikiri. Click here for the recipe.

[via Kotaku]

Candy is awesome, but candy that’s made as the result of a lively musical performance is super awesome! This hypnotic video shows a traditional Korean candy cutter using a heavy pair of shears and a trowel to hammer and cut pieces of hobakyeot, a pumpkin-flavored form of Yeot, a traditional Korean confection that’s similar to taffy.

These candy artisans turn what could be a monotonous process, cutting many small pieces from one large block, into a dynamic and engaging performance with a tasty result.

Click here for additional videos of Korean candy cutters in action.

Video posted YouTube user Victoria Nagy.

[via Reddit]

If you’re looking way to experience 4th of July fireworks that’s less risky for your fingers and a whole lot more delicious, look no further. Our all-time favourite Dessert Detective Jessie Oleson, aka Cakespy (previously featured here), recently shared her awesome recipe for Explosively Delicious Fourth of July Cookies.

The not-so-secret explosive ingredient is Pop Rocks. In this recipe they’re used in both the cookie dough itself and as a garnish.

"This not only makes them crackle like fireworks but also pays homage to that other all-consuming american obsession: truly trashy candy (and I say this in the most loving way possible)."

Click here for the recipe and instructions.

[via CakeSpy]

We’d like to add that you can dramatically transform this recipe in three different, but equally awesome ways by substituting the Pop Rocks with Sizzling Bacon Candy, Explosing Wasabi Candy or Exploding Popcorn Candy.