This tentacular octopus hairpiece is the work of Australian artist Kirstie Williams (deviantARTist Deeed), who created it as part of a magnificent costume for a steampunk ball she recently attended. Williams documented each step of the elaborate creation process, which involved sculpting a foam core, covering it in long artificial hair wefts and then enhancing it with copper-colored paint and a few obligatory brass gears. The hirsute cephalopod was then attached to an Arda Candy Striper wig. As you can see, the result of all her effort is nothing short of spectacular.

Williams is currently auctioning off a commission for one customized octopus hairpiece just like the one seen here. The auction ends June 15, 2014. Click here for details.

Top three photos by Gillian B Dragancaor.

[via Nerdcore and Fashionably Geek]

We’re already huge fans of the indescribably awesome octopus, but that doesn’t mean we aren’t always ready to be astonished by them all over again. This amazing video shows an octopus freeing itself from a closed jar by twisting off the lid from the inside. It was originally posted to the YouTube account of the Enoshima Aquarium, which is located in the city of Fujisawa in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan.

Further proof that octopodes rule.

[via Incredible Things]

Cuttlefish are awesome but, as much as we’d like to have a little cuttlefish friend, it’s probably not a good idea to try to keep one as a pet. Thankfully we just discovered this shiny alternative that could happily live in our pockets.

Designed by Bathsheba Sculpture, this beautiful cuttlefish is made of solid steel and functions as a bottle opener. They’re also available in bronze and plastic (but without the bottle opener functionality). Click here to order.

[via HiConsumption]

This gorgeous, tentacular object is an American chatelaine dating back to 1887. A chatelaine is a decorative belt hook or clasp worn at the waist with a series of chains suspended from it. They were worn by many housekeepers during the 19th century, with each tentacle chain fastened to a useful household appendage such as scissors, thimble, watch, key, vinaigrette, household seal, etc.
This stunning sterling silver octopus chatelaine was made by the Gorham Manufacturing Company and is part of the jewelry collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
[via Retronaut]

This gorgeous, tentacular object is an American chatelaine dating back to 1887. A chatelaine is a decorative belt hook or clasp worn at the waist with a series of chains suspended from it. They were worn by many housekeepers during the 19th century, with each tentacle chain fastened to a useful household appendage such as scissors, thimble, watch, key, vinaigrette, household seal, etc.

This stunning sterling silver octopus chatelaine was made by the Gorham Manufacturing Company and is part of the jewelry collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

[via Retronaut]

3D modeler Sean Charlesworth designed, printed and built this tentacular Octopod Underwater Salvage Vehicle as his thesis project for a Masters of Science in Digital Imaging and Design at NYU. Inspired by the Nautilus from Disney’s 1954 film 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, Sean’s awesome mechanical octopus-shaped vehicle is beautifully detailed. It features LED lights and an assortment of other working features such as a functional door, hoist, latches, and opening floor panel.

"…the model was designed in CINEMA 4D Studio and different materials, types and colours were assigned to each part. The digital models were printed at the New York University Advance Media Studio on an Objet Connex500 3D Printer. The Objet Connex500 is Objet’s pioneering multi-material 3D printer featuring a large build tray size of 500 x 400 x 200mm and can print from a range of 107 different materials, with up to 14 different materials in a single part."

Click here to learn more about the amazing Octopod and then visit Sean Charlesworth’s website to check out more of his 3D design and modeling work.

[via io9]

This incredibly awesome Octopus Chandelier is the work of Mason Parker of Mason’s Creations. The tentacular stained glass light fixture measures approximately four feet across, sports eight detachable tentacles, and can be illuminated in three different ways - using just the head, just the tentacles, or by placing real candles in the candleholders held by each curled tentacle.

Mason recently sold this particular octopoid light fixture, but don’t worry, he’s planning to make another one soon. Let’s all start saving our pennies. The finished piece sells for $18,000, so perhaps we can work out some sort of time-sharing scheme.

[via io9]

This awesome sculpture, depicting a big bright orange octopus hoisting a tiny diver in one of her tentacles, was created by German sculptor Katharina Fritsch in 2010. We can’t decide if this lovely cephalopod has caught the diver getting up to no good and is about to dish out some punishment, or if she’s simply trying to give the diver a better view of something fantastic that they’re watching together.

[via Beautiful Decay and the Matthew Marks Gallery]

Obvious Winner recently shared a few tentacular pieces of artwork by Singapore-based artist Keng Lye (previously featured here). You may recall that Keng creates these amazingly lifelike depictions of aquatic animals by gradually layering containers with acrylic paint and resin. The end result is a painting of a creature that looks like it’s about to wriggle out of its container and onto your lap.

Visit Keng Lye’s DeviantART gallery to view more of his awesome artwork.

[via Obvious Winner]

This tentacular piece of yarnbombing is the collaborative work of Jill Watt, who blogs as the Dapper Toad, and her sister Lorna of Knits For Life. This isn’t their first knitted creation, but it is their biggest yet.

The sisters used four miles of yarn to transform a Magnolia tree in San Mateo, CA into a giant blue squid. They even included some crocheted goldfish trapped in the squid’s tentacles.

"Lorna, an artist-in-residence for the Downtown San Mateo Association, wrote up a great post on how she and her sister conceived of, designed, and then created the “Yarnbomb Squid Tree.” Jill reports that it took 20 hours on a sweater machine to make enough to cover the tree and that it took them 14 hours to install it, in 91°F weather!”

[via Laughing Squid]

These awesome little cephalopods are Bobtail squid and they were photographed by diver and underwater photographer Todd Bretl. Todd’s stunning photos reveal the beautiful markings on the squids’ tentacular bodies and, we like to think, a bit of their respective personalities as well.

Bobtail squid primarily inhabit the shallow coastal waters of the Pacific Ocean and are closely related to cuttlefish. However they tend to have a rounder mantle than cuttlefish and have no cuttlebone. And when we describe them as little, we really mean it. The typical mantle length of a male bobtail squid measures being between 1 and 8& cm.

Visit Design Taxi to view more of Todd Bretl’s beguiling Bobtail squid.