French art director and illustrator Troqman makes clever use of both his pens and his sketchbooks as well as his surroundings in order to create entertaining drawings of characters appearing to interact with the real world. Our favorite pieces involve characters on multiple pages or sketchbooks interacting with each other as well as the 3D world. And then there’s Spider-Man who think’s he just found his long-lost father.

Troqman calls this playful hobby Cartoon Bombing and you can see a lot more of it over o Instagram or right here on Tumblr at troqman.

[via Bored Panda]

Last week we featured a selection of exquisite works of cut paper art by a Japanese Kirie artist named Akira Nagaya. Today we learned that Nagaya also creates awesome cut-out depictions of beloved Anime, manga, cartoon and comic book characters using individual Post-it notes.

Visit Akira Nagaya’s Facebook page to view more of his playful pop culture Post-it cut-outs.

[via Spoon & Tamago]

Today the Department of Awesome Animal Hybrids explores the work of Italian artist Alessandro Gallo. He hand-sculpts wonderfully strange and unsettlingly realistic characters who are part human, part animal, usually dressed in everyday clothes and sometimes engaged is perfectly ordinary activities such as reading on a bench, playing the guitar or having a swing in a park.

"Expertly reproducing human and animal anatomy, Gallo blends the two to create convincing hybrids of man and beast. The works produce an almost eerie sense of unheimliche, as Freud put it: when the familiar becomes uncomfortably strange.”

Gallo just opened a solo exhibition of his newest series of hybrid figures on display at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York. The show is entitled Strani Incontri, which is Italian for “Strange Encounters” and runs through October 4, 2014.

Visit Alessandro Gallo’s website to check out more of his fascinating sculptures.

[via Visual News and Hi-Fructose]

Pareidolia is the psychological phenomenon of perceiving significance (often an image or sound) in vague or random stimulus. One of the most common examples is seeing animals or faces in the clouds. For an ongoing project entitled Shaping Clouds Argentinian creative and copywriter Martín Feijoó (aka Tincho) uses the shapes of clouds he spots in the sky as the inspiration for fanciful illustrations.

After photographing a cloud formation that’s caught his fancy, Feijoó returns home to depict in pen and ink the creatures and characters his mind’s eye has seen in the clouds.

“When I was a child I was told that clouds’ shapes were created by expert balloon twister clowns who live in the sky, so that they can keep entertaining children,” Feijoó explains on his site. “On my last trip to Mexico I remembered this and I started to photograph clouds on the road. The result is Shaping Clouds, a series of illustrations where I drew the first thing that came into my mind when I saw these clouds that I imagine someone made for me.”

Feijoó is the Cloud Shaper and you can follow his cloudy creations right here on Tumblr at shapingcloudsproject. Visit his Behance site to check out his professional work.

[via Visual News]

In Japan you can enjoy your favorite anime, cartoon and video game characters as more than simply visual entertainment. They’re also available as sweet treats. These kawaii confections are a form of wagashi (和菓子) called nerikiri (練り切り). Made from white bean paste and rice-based dough, nerikiri are often tinted and molded similar to how marzipan is prepared in Western desserts.

These pop culture-inspired nerikiri were all made by Japanese Twitter user Otakumi at a wagashi shop called Kuramoto Hinode, which is located in the Tokushima Prefecture of Japan’s Shikoku island.

Follow Otakumi’s Twitter feed

You can also try your hand at making your very own nerikiri. Click here for the recipe.

[via Kotaku]

Today the Department of Marvelous Makeup pays a visit to London-based hair and makeup artist Laura Jenkinson, who has fun using her talents to transform her own lips into playful depictions of all sorts of pop culture characters, ranging from Shrek, Mr. T and Cartman to a host of Looney Tunes and Disney characters. We love how she even turned herself upside-down to accommodate the long face of Wallace from Wallace & Gromit.

Follow Laura Jenkinson’s Instagram account to see many more of her creative cosmetic transformations.

[via WHUDAT]

This awesome Finn and Jake chair was created by Redditor reallylovely, who spotted the old, yet still sturdy chair at an antique shop and immediately recognized its potential resemblance to our favorite post-apocalyptic human boy:

"I cleaned, sanded, primed then painted the design with acrylics. I also added a few coats of glow-in-the-dark paint to his hood and his socks. Then I sealed it about four times. For the seat, I used felt, and hand-embroidered the details of Jake’s face. For the dream bubble, I used a small piece of Adventure Time printed fabric which I bought online. After this photo was taken, I added a clear plastic layer to the seat to protect the design and allow it to actually be used as a chair (but I mostly made it as art)."

Here’s hoping that Adventure Time-themed furniture restoration becomes a trend.
[via Neatorama]

This awesome Finn and Jake chair was created by Redditor reallylovely, who spotted the old, yet still sturdy chair at an antique shop and immediately recognized its potential resemblance to our favorite post-apocalyptic human boy:

"I cleaned, sanded, primed then painted the design with acrylics. I also added a few coats of glow-in-the-dark paint to his hood and his socks. Then I sealed it about four times. For the seat, I used felt, and hand-embroidered the details of Jake’s face. For the dream bubble, I used a small piece of Adventure Time printed fabric which I bought online. After this photo was taken, I added a clear plastic layer to the seat to protect the design and allow it to actually be used as a chair (but I mostly made it as art)."

Here’s hoping that Adventure Time-themed furniture restoration becomes a trend.

[via Neatorama]

American oil painter Donald Roller Wilson combines the polished realism of the Old Masters with a cast of eccentric anthropomophized animal characters, including dogs, cats and plenty of primates - many of whom are smokers - to create awesome pop surrealist portraits. His regular characters include Cookie the Baby Orangutan, Jane the Pug Girl, Jack the Jack Russell “Terror,” Loretta the Actress Cat, Miss DogAmerica, and Patricia the Seeing Eye Dog of Houston.

According to the New York Times, “Donald Roller Wilson’s goofy, hallucinogenic, Old Master-style painting of monkeys, dogs and cats dressed up in antique costumes may be kitsch, but it’s high-quality kitsch, like good beach reading.”

One of our favorite things about his paintings is that Donald Roller Wilson creates a brief narrative for each of them, much like Travis Louie (previously featured here) does for his own ever-expanding cast of characters.

We recommend visiting Donald Roller Wilson’s online gallery to view many more of his wonderfully strange paintings and read the stories that go with them.

[via Faith is Torment]

Noel Cruz is a doll repaint artist, and an awesome one at that. He’s loved drawing and painting characters from his favorite TV shows since childhood, in particular Lindsay Wagner as Jaime Sommers in The Bionic Woman. But it wasn’t until Cruz first encountered a repainted doll on eBay, thanks to his wife who’s a doll collector, that he thought, “Hey, I could do this too!” And now he’s one of the best in the doll painting community.

It took time and lots of practice for Cruz to adapt his skills from painting on wide, flat canvases to small, smooth plastic doll faces. Today his ability to transform factory-painted character and celebrity dolls into impeccably detailed, lifelike resemblances of the actual people on which they were based puts the original dolls to shame. Accomplishing this feat requires many photos of the famous person/character, plenty of time, and a great deal of skill.

To check out more of his stunning repainted dolls, check out Noel Cruz’s website and Facebook page. You can also follow him via Instagram and right here on Tumblr at noelcruzcreations. And, if you’ve got an urge to own one of his dolls, keep an eye on Cruz’s eBay auction listings.

[via RocketNews24]

Portland, OR-based glass artist Mike Gong creates beautiful marbles containing awesomely complex and vibrant designs. Those pictured here are part of Gong’s aptly-titled Acid Eater series. Each handmade glass marble seen here contains a unique little galaxy of swirly, colorful shapes and patterns, at the heart of which appears a goofy, trippy character eagerly extending its tongue to slurp up a psychedelic square.

Visit Mike Gong’s Facebook page and PBase to check out many more of his hallucinatory marbles, some of which are available for purchase via Not Just Marbles and Glass Orbits.

[via Design Taxi and Design Faves]