Today the Department of Marvelous Makeup pays a visit to London-based hair and makeup artist Laura Jenkinson, who has fun using her talents to transform her own lips into playful depictions of all sorts of pop culture characters, ranging from Shrek, Mr. T and Cartman to a host of Looney Tunes and Disney characters. We love how she even turned herself upside-down to accommodate the long face of Wallace from Wallace & Gromit.

Follow Laura Jenkinson’s Instagram account to see many more of her creative cosmetic transformations.

[via WHUDAT]

This awesome Finn and Jake chair was created by Redditor reallylovely, who spotted the old, yet still sturdy chair at an antique shop and immediately recognized its potential resemblance to our favorite post-apocalyptic human boy:

"I cleaned, sanded, primed then painted the design with acrylics. I also added a few coats of glow-in-the-dark paint to his hood and his socks. Then I sealed it about four times. For the seat, I used felt, and hand-embroidered the details of Jake’s face. For the dream bubble, I used a small piece of Adventure Time printed fabric which I bought online. After this photo was taken, I added a clear plastic layer to the seat to protect the design and allow it to actually be used as a chair (but I mostly made it as art)."

Here’s hoping that Adventure Time-themed furniture restoration becomes a trend.
[via Neatorama]

This awesome Finn and Jake chair was created by Redditor reallylovely, who spotted the old, yet still sturdy chair at an antique shop and immediately recognized its potential resemblance to our favorite post-apocalyptic human boy:

"I cleaned, sanded, primed then painted the design with acrylics. I also added a few coats of glow-in-the-dark paint to his hood and his socks. Then I sealed it about four times. For the seat, I used felt, and hand-embroidered the details of Jake’s face. For the dream bubble, I used a small piece of Adventure Time printed fabric which I bought online. After this photo was taken, I added a clear plastic layer to the seat to protect the design and allow it to actually be used as a chair (but I mostly made it as art)."

Here’s hoping that Adventure Time-themed furniture restoration becomes a trend.

[via Neatorama]

American oil painter Donald Roller Wilson combines the polished realism of the Old Masters with a cast of eccentric anthropomophized animal characters, including dogs, cats and plenty of primates - many of whom are smokers - to create awesome pop surrealist portraits. His regular characters include Cookie the Baby Orangutan, Jane the Pug Girl, Jack the Jack Russell “Terror,” Loretta the Actress Cat, Miss DogAmerica, and Patricia the Seeing Eye Dog of Houston.

According to the New York Times, “Donald Roller Wilson’s goofy, hallucinogenic, Old Master-style painting of monkeys, dogs and cats dressed up in antique costumes may be kitsch, but it’s high-quality kitsch, like good beach reading.”

One of our favorite things about his paintings is that Donald Roller Wilson creates a brief narrative for each of them, much like Travis Louie (previously featured here) does for his own ever-expanding cast of characters.

We recommend visiting Donald Roller Wilson’s online gallery to view many more of his wonderfully strange paintings and read the stories that go with them.

[via Faith is Torment]

Noel Cruz is a doll repaint artist, and an awesome one at that. He’s loved drawing and painting characters from his favorite TV shows since childhood, in particular Lindsay Wagner as Jaime Sommers in The Bionic Woman. But it wasn’t until Cruz first encountered a repainted doll on eBay, thanks to his wife who’s a doll collector, that he thought, “Hey, I could do this too!” And now he’s one of the best in the doll painting community.

It took time and lots of practice for Cruz to adapt his skills from painting on wide, flat canvases to small, smooth plastic doll faces. Today his ability to transform factory-painted character and celebrity dolls into impeccably detailed, lifelike resemblances of the actual people on which they were based puts the original dolls to shame. Accomplishing this feat requires many photos of the famous person/character, plenty of time, and a great deal of skill.

To check out more of his stunning repainted dolls, check out Noel Cruz’s website and Facebook page. You can also follow him via Instagram and right here on Tumblr at noelcruzcreations. And, if you’ve got an urge to own one of his dolls, keep an eye on Cruz’s eBay auction listings.

[via RocketNews24]

Portland, OR-based glass artist Mike Gong creates beautiful marbles containing awesomely complex and vibrant designs. Those pictured here are part of Gong’s aptly-titled Acid Eater series. Each handmade glass marble seen here contains a unique little galaxy of swirly, colorful shapes and patterns, at the heart of which appears a goofy, trippy character eagerly extending its tongue to slurp up a psychedelic square.

Visit Mike Gong’s Facebook page and PBase to check out many more of his hallucinatory marbles, some of which are available for purchase via Not Just Marbles and Glass Orbits.

[via Design Taxi and Design Faves]

These strangely hypnotic gifs are the work of Dundee, Scotland-based illustrator Sam Lyon. He calls them Jelly Gummies. There’s something about these fleshy, pulsating, amorphous creatures - a combination of anthropomorphism, creepiness, and our inexplicable suspicion that they’d be both fun to chew on and pleasing to taste - that makes them awesome.

You can find more of Lyon’s perpetually mutating Jelly Gummies right here on Tumblr at jellygummies. He also has a Jelly Gummies Etsy shop, just in case you’d like to invite some of this wonderfully squishy weirdness into your home.

[via designboom]

We love these wonderful vintage postcards that’ve been beautifully illustrated with portraits of characters from Twin Peaks, still one of our all-time favorite TV shows. They’re from a series called Lost in the Post: Twin Peaks created by Paul Willoughby, London-based illustrator, artist and creative director of Human After All. They were shown at a 20th-anniversary exhibition of Twin Peaks-releated art, which took place at the Menier Gallery in Southwark, London in October 2012.

[via Flavorwire]

Argentinian artist and industrial designer Camila Valdez creates human-sized fiberglass sculptures of anthropomorphic desserts. Cupcakes, donuts, popsicles, ice cream bars and even a great big box of popcorn each appear to have their own distinct personalities. While they lack discernible facial features, they’ve sprouted legs and demonstrate their different personalities with their expressive body language and clothing.

During exhibitions Valdez inviters viewers to interact with her sculptures by changing their clothes to alter their projected personalities. We’d arrange them all together into a mouthwatering chorus line à la The Rockettes.

Visit Camila Valdez’s Flickr stream to check out more of sculptural anthropomorphized sweets.

[via Design Taxi]

Elsa Rhae is a Kansas City-based video editor/producer and awesome character makeup artist. She’s completely self-taught and able to transform herself into a fantastic variety of characters, including instantly recognizable faces from comic books, video games, movies and tv shows, spending between one and three hours on each dramatic transformation.

Visit Elsa Rhae’s YouTube channel for timelapse tranformations and makeup tutorials.

[via 22 Words]

New York City-based artist James Haggerty creates incredibly intricate mosaic portraits of Star Wars characters using tens of thousands of multi-colored staples punched into painted boards. Haggerty’s Darth Vader piece, entitled The Side, measures 40” x 32” and is made of 10,496 staples (7,696 silver and 2,800 red). Greedo’s unmistakable green mug is made of 21,458 staples and it took 33,580 staples to create C-3PO’s worried face.

Visit James Haggerty’s Facebook page for additional images of his geektastic artwork.

[via Laughing Squid]