Let’s take another look at the 2014 Harbin International Ice and Snow Sculpture Festival in northern city of Harbin, China (previously featured here). This time we’ll get to see what some of the massive ice and snow sculptures look like when they’re fantastically lit up at night. A landscape that’s completely white by day becomes a magical city of rainbow ice by night.

To get a better sense of just how large these frozen structures are, keep your eyes peeled for the silhouettes of people in these photos.

Photos by Lintao Zhang (1-2) and Kim Kyung-Hoon (3-4) respectively.

[via The Atlantic: In Focus]

No matter what your day job is, if you’re someone who likes to make art in your spare time, chances are you’ll find a way to do it at work as well. Rafael Veyisov works are a parking attendant in the city of Baku, the capital of Azerbaijan. When he isn’t parking or retrieving cars, he turns them into mobile works of ephemeral art. Using his bare fingers, Rafael rubs the dust off the cars creating silhouetted landscapes, cityscapes, or scenes involving animals and fantastic creatures. Much to our delight, we even spotted a few tentacles on one of his cars.

You may be wondering how Rafael’s customers have reacted to this. When word of his illustrated vehicles began to spread, people weren’t upset. Instead customers began dropping off their cars with him in hopes of returning later to see what he’d made using their vehicles.

Visit Design Taxi to watch a brief video of Rafael Veyisov creating some of his awesome automotive artwork.

A day dedicated to sharing awesome things made of food is a perfect excuse to share more charming and completely edible creations by Malaysian artist/architect Hong Yi (previously featured here).

Hong Yi (who often goes by the nickname Red) creates new pieces all the time. Most recently she’s been making beautiful pieces using flower petals. Follow her ongoing work on Facebook and/or Instagram.

[via Colossal and Hong Yi’s Facebook page)

For a series of awesome sculptures entitled Why not hand over a shelter to hermit crabs?, Japanese artist Aki Inomata creates plastic habitats for hermit crabs inspired by styles of architecture ranging from major cityscapes (like New York’s skyline) to Parisian apartments or Tokyo-style homes.

Aki Inomata creates these delicate and beautiful new habitats by first conducting CT scans of her hermit crabs’ discarded shells. Capturing a detailed 3D rendering of their abandoned homes enables her to prototype and produce new habitable shelters that her hermit crabs will find similar to their usual homes.

"The semi-transparent, delicate forms are designed in the style of physical human environments, which ironically become a shelter for the aquatic arthropods. The biology of the hermit crab makes it a fascinating example of identity transfer — as they grow they require larger shells and periodically interchange their external portion with other members of the crustacean community. Inomata connects her study of the hermit’s transformation to the self-adaptation of humans, whether it be in acquiring a new nationality, immigrating or relocating."

[via Designboom]

Why yes, that is the famous Chicago skyline made entirely out of bacon. It was recently photographed by Dennis Lee at the 5th annual Baconfest Chicago. 

“Baconfest Chicago is like Lollapalooza, except instead of bands, you have a talented crew of chefs, and instead of music, well, there’s bacon. Lots and lots of bacon…”

As people who have proudly created an entire Bacon Gift Shop, this sounds like our idea of heaven. 
Head over to Serious Eats Chicago to view more photos of the meaty festivities. 

Why yes, that is the famous Chicago skyline made entirely out of bacon. It was recently photographed by Dennis Lee at the 5th annual Baconfest Chicago

Baconfest Chicago is like Lollapalooza, except instead of bands, you have a talented crew of chefs, and instead of music, well, there’s baconLots and lots of bacon…”

As people who have proudly created an entire Bacon Gift Shop, this sounds like our idea of heaven. 

Head over to Serious Eats Chicago to view more photos of the meaty festivities. 

Sunrises are wonderful, but let’s not forget that moonrises are also beautiful to behold. Los Angeles-based artist and motion designer Dan Marker-Moore created the awesome photo and gif you see above revealing the path of the moon as it rose over Los Angeles. The photo is actually a combination of 11 separate photos taken over the course of 27 minutes and 59 seconds.

Click here to watch Dan’s time-lapse video of the moonrise.

[via Twisted Sifter]

More wonderfully whimsical street art by French artist OaKoAK (previously featured here), who likes to play with existing elements of the urban landscape, often making surprisingly small alterations or enhancements to achieve striking results, enabling us to see the world through his eyes.

"Using simple means and materials, OakOak undermines his neighborhood with playful results. He uses a minimal amount of actual original artwork, instead re-purposing signs, facades, cement blocks, chipping paint, and more.  OakOak transforms a neighborhood’s imperfections into its own adornments. "

He says of his interventions:

“The less I intervene on the wall or the road, the better, especially if I can totally change the sense of the urban environment.” 

[via Beautiful Decay]

San Francisco-based artist Liz Hickok works in photography, video, sculpture, and installation. She has made a name for herself in the art world by receating famous cityscapes, skylines, and landmarks using wiggly, jiggly Jell-O. 

"I create glowing, jellied scale models of urban sites, transforming ordinary physical surroundings into something unexpected and ephemeral. Lit from below, the molded shapes of the city blur into a jewel-like mosaic of luminous color and volume… While the translucent beauty of the compositions first seduces the viewer, their fragility quickly becomes a metaphor for the transitory nature of human artifacts.

I have always been interested in architectural scale models of cities, and how photography can play with the viewer’s sense of scale, blurring differences between the real city and the constructed one. Once I began building my own model cities out of Jell-O I found that the jiggly, iconic childhood dessert is not only perishable, but also uncontrollable. Each time I take a picture of one of my cityscapes any building may begin to sweat or even liquefy, taking on a new persona.

Liz Hickok will be showing work at The Emerald Tablet in San Francisco from October 20th to November 18th as part of a group exhibition entitled A.D.D..

[via Beautiful Decay and Flavorwire]

Check out these awesome, intricate 3D paper cities created by Ingrid Siliakus. It’s paper architecture!

From flat sheets of paper entire cities emerge, rich in unexpected details like balconies, tiny windows and even little people. Dutch artist Ingrid Siliakus uses an initial 90-degree fold to give her miniature cityscapes depth and dimension, with an end result that is reminiscent of pop-up books.

Under Siliakus’ skilled hand, paper ranging from thin sheets to hefty card stock assemble into complex staircases, arches and spires. She specializes in the works of master architects, including Gaudi’s iconic Sagrada Familia of Barcelona.

“Working with paper forces me to be humble, since this medium has a character of its own that asks for cooperation. It is a challenge to find this cooperation with each separate paper brand I work with. Working with paper the way I do, namely by means of cutting and folding creating paper sculptures, asks of me to work with meditative precision. Paper architecture does not bare haste, it is its enemy; one moment of loss of concentration, can lead to failure of a piece. I experience an ultimate satisfaction at the critic moment when the paper, with a silenced sigh, surrenders and becomes a blade-sharp crease. The sound of the paper, which guides this surrendering, to me is incomparable…

If you like this, make sure to visit WebUrbanist to view more awesome paper creations by Ingrid Siliakus!

"Empire State", "Everglades, Florida”, “Battery Park Night, New York”, and "Big Sur" by American photographer and filmmaker Randy Scott Slavin, whose work makes us view the world in another light. For his Alternate Perspective series Randy can take up to a hundred photos of a scene in order to construct a 360 degree image before stitching them all together to create a fantastic stereographic projection like the ones you see here.

Be sure to visit Telegraph.co.uk to view more of Randy Scott Slavin's awesome artwork!