These dreamlike sculptures are the work of Chinese artist Hu Shaoming, sculptor and graduate of the Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts. For his city series Shaoming created an awesome transparent blue mechanical seahorse, submerged in water with a silver cityscape on the top of its head emerging from the surface of the water.

For a series dealing with the concept of time, Shaoming disassembled old objects, such as cameras and telephones, and then rebuilt them with the surreally beautiful addition of zippers which open to reveal the inner mechanisms of each device.

Check out more awesome artwork by Hu Shaoming on Jue.so.

[via Colossal]

Our acrophobic friends may want to skip this post:

The John Hancock Center in Chicago has a truly breathtaking new attraction called Tilt. It’s glass enclosure located on the building’s 94th floor that holds eight people and tilts them forward, so that they lean out and take in a truly unique and adrenaline-packed view of the Windy City from over 1000 feet above the ground.

Click here for a thrilling/nerve-racking video demonstration.

[via HiConsumption]

Japanese Twitter user @KAGAYA_11949 captured these awesome images of a phenomenal bolt of lightning striking the Tokyo Skytree. With a height of 634 meters (2,080 ft), it’s Japan’s tallest structure and the tallest broadcasting tower in the world. The view from up there must be amazing, but we’d rather not be in there during a storm like this.

Photos via Nikken Sekkei and KAGAYA_11949

[via RocketNews24]

Let’s take another look at the 2014 Harbin International Ice and Snow Sculpture Festival in northern city of Harbin, China (previously featured here). This time we’ll get to see what some of the massive ice and snow sculptures look like when they’re fantastically lit up at night. A landscape that’s completely white by day becomes a magical city of rainbow ice by night.

To get a better sense of just how large these frozen structures are, keep your eyes peeled for the silhouettes of people in these photos.

Photos by Lintao Zhang (1-2) and Kim Kyung-Hoon (3-4) respectively.

[via The Atlantic: In Focus]

No matter what your day job is, if you’re someone who likes to make art in your spare time, chances are you’ll find a way to do it at work as well. Rafael Veyisov works are a parking attendant in the city of Baku, the capital of Azerbaijan. When he isn’t parking or retrieving cars, he turns them into mobile works of ephemeral art. Using his bare fingers, Rafael rubs the dust off the cars creating silhouetted landscapes, cityscapes, or scenes involving animals and fantastic creatures. Much to our delight, we even spotted a few tentacles on one of his cars.

You may be wondering how Rafael’s customers have reacted to this. When word of his illustrated vehicles began to spread, people weren’t upset. Instead customers began dropping off their cars with him in hopes of returning later to see what he’d made using their vehicles.

Visit Design Taxi to watch a brief video of Rafael Veyisov creating some of his awesome automotive artwork.

A day dedicated to sharing awesome things made of food is a perfect excuse to share more charming and completely edible creations by Malaysian artist/architect Hong Yi (previously featured here).

Hong Yi (who often goes by the nickname Red) creates new pieces all the time. Most recently she’s been making beautiful pieces using flower petals. Follow her ongoing work on Facebook and/or Instagram.

[via Colossal and Hong Yi’s Facebook page)

For a series of awesome sculptures entitled Why not hand over a shelter to hermit crabs?, Japanese artist Aki Inomata creates plastic habitats for hermit crabs inspired by styles of architecture ranging from major cityscapes (like New York’s skyline) to Parisian apartments or Tokyo-style homes.

Aki Inomata creates these delicate and beautiful new habitats by first conducting CT scans of her hermit crabs’ discarded shells. Capturing a detailed 3D rendering of their abandoned homes enables her to prototype and produce new habitable shelters that her hermit crabs will find similar to their usual homes.

"The semi-transparent, delicate forms are designed in the style of physical human environments, which ironically become a shelter for the aquatic arthropods. The biology of the hermit crab makes it a fascinating example of identity transfer — as they grow they require larger shells and periodically interchange their external portion with other members of the crustacean community. Inomata connects her study of the hermit’s transformation to the self-adaptation of humans, whether it be in acquiring a new nationality, immigrating or relocating."

[via Designboom]

Why yes, that is the famous Chicago skyline made entirely out of bacon. It was recently photographed by Dennis Lee at the 5th annual Baconfest Chicago. 

“Baconfest Chicago is like Lollapalooza, except instead of bands, you have a talented crew of chefs, and instead of music, well, there’s bacon. Lots and lots of bacon…”

As people who have proudly created an entire Bacon Gift Shop, this sounds like our idea of heaven. 
Head over to Serious Eats Chicago to view more photos of the meaty festivities. 

Why yes, that is the famous Chicago skyline made entirely out of bacon. It was recently photographed by Dennis Lee at the 5th annual Baconfest Chicago

Baconfest Chicago is like Lollapalooza, except instead of bands, you have a talented crew of chefs, and instead of music, well, there’s baconLots and lots of bacon…”

As people who have proudly created an entire Bacon Gift Shop, this sounds like our idea of heaven. 

Head over to Serious Eats Chicago to view more photos of the meaty festivities. 

Sunrises are wonderful, but let’s not forget that moonrises are also beautiful to behold. Los Angeles-based artist and motion designer Dan Marker-Moore created the awesome photo and gif you see above revealing the path of the moon as it rose over Los Angeles. The photo is actually a combination of 11 separate photos taken over the course of 27 minutes and 59 seconds.

Click here to watch Dan’s time-lapse video of the moonrise.

[via Twisted Sifter]

More wonderfully whimsical street art by French artist OaKoAK (previously featured here), who likes to play with existing elements of the urban landscape, often making surprisingly small alterations or enhancements to achieve striking results, enabling us to see the world through his eyes.

"Using simple means and materials, OakOak undermines his neighborhood with playful results. He uses a minimal amount of actual original artwork, instead re-purposing signs, facades, cement blocks, chipping paint, and more.  OakOak transforms a neighborhood’s imperfections into its own adornments. "

He says of his interventions:

“The less I intervene on the wall or the road, the better, especially if I can totally change the sense of the urban environment.” 

[via Beautiful Decay]