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89 posts tagged Cooking

We’re sure you’ll agree that one of the best parts about the return of spring is the reappearance of Easter candy on store shelves, not the least of which are those oh-so-precious Cadbury Creme Eggs. Over the years our favourite Dessert Detective Jessie Oleson, aka Cakespy (previously featured here), has created a mouthwatering suite of recipes featuring Cadbury Eggs. And, because she’s all about sharing the sweetness, she always provides thorough instructions.

Here you see Jessie’s Cadbury Creme Deviled Eggs, Cadbury Creme Eggs Benedict, Cadbury Creme Egg Salad Sandwiches, Cadbury Creme Scotch Eggs, and last but not least, her latest creation: Cadbury Creme Egg in Hole Toast. It’s a thick slice of pound cake with half a Cadbury Egg in the center that’s heated on a griddle and served warm, melty and delicious. (Each link will take you to the corresponding recipe)

[via Serious Eats]

Behold the awesomeness that is the Corona-Matic keyboard waffle iron! It was created by New York-based designed Chris Dimino using a 1960s Smith Corona typewriter and a waffle iron from the same period. We love the jams jars and powdered sugar shaker in place of ink dispensers. Unfortunately this stylish marriage of vintage writing machine and kitchen utensil isn’t a functional model.
But never fear, Chris is currently hard at work on designing a functioning keyboard waffle iron. He plans to have a limited edition available for purchase by winter 2014. Keep an eye on his Keyboard Waffle Iron website for production status updates. With any luck we’ll soon be able to make delicious keyboard-shaped waffles to our hearts’ (and stomachs’) content.
[via Lost at E Minor]

Behold the awesomeness that is the Corona-Matic keyboard waffle iron! It was created by New York-based designed Chris Dimino using a 1960s Smith Corona typewriter and a waffle iron from the same period. We love the jams jars and powdered sugar shaker in place of ink dispensers. Unfortunately this stylish marriage of vintage writing machine and kitchen utensil isn’t a functional model.

But never fear, Chris is currently hard at work on designing a functioning keyboard waffle iron. He plans to have a limited edition available for purchase by winter 2014. Keep an eye on his Keyboard Waffle Iron website for production status updates. With any luck we’ll soon be able to make delicious keyboard-shaped waffles to our hearts’ (and stomachs’) content.

[via Lost at E Minor]

Groundhog Day is upon us once again and we’re all eager to learn Punxsutawney Phil’s weather prediction for 2014. Is spring just around the corner or will winter carry on? Last year we posted about an awesome no-bake recipe for Pop-up Groundhog Cookies created by Sandra Denneler over at SheKnows. This year Sandra switched things up by making celebratory edible woodchucks that are savoury instead of sweet.

These adorable Groundhog Hot Dogs were made using white cheese, black olives, cream cheese, a black food colouring pen and hot dogs. They pop their heads out of biscuits and cornbread muffins (for an early spring) and mounds of mashed potatoes (for six more weeks of winter). But we’re guessing they won’t last long enough to cast a shadow.

Click here for the complete recipe and instructions.

[via Neatorama]

After gathering round the Cthulhumas tree to sing Lovecraftian Solstice Carols and exchange accursed texts and arcane artifacts, it’s time for the Horrible Holiday Feast. We can’t think of a more disturbingly suitable entrée than Lubbock, Texas-based Rusty Eulberg’s monstrous “Cthurkey”:

According to Eulberg, he and wife Jennifer Robledo “wanted to do something unique for Christmas dinner with friends of ours. Jenny is a big fan of Cthulhu so we went and bought some crab legs and some octopus and bacon and cooked them all separate and slapped them together on a plate, and that was it. The next year I made a Cthicken [see bottom photo]; the same thing using squid instead of octopus and a chicken.”

Eulberg says, “The universal reaction was, ‘Oh my God, I couldn’t eat that.’ But each individual piece was cooked separately; all I did was set them together on the plate. It was delicious. The crab leg was awesome and the bacon added a nice flavor to the turkey.”

Visit Gothamist to learn more about Rusty Eulberg’s malevolent holiday meals.

Jenn Fujikawa of That’s Nerdalicious! created the perfect DIY Christmas tree decoration for bacon lovers: a garland that’s made of nothing but mouthwatering black pepper bacon.

"If you’ve ever thought to yourself, “You know what my Christmas tree needs? MORE BACON,” then I have a solution for you – a Christmas garland made out of crispy, peppery bacon!

Just like the nostalgic paper rings you used to make as crafts when you were a kid, in this case I’ve substituted everyone’s favorite cured pork product.”

Click here for complete instructions.

There’s only one problem with this edible garland. We know our own passion for bacon well enough to know that we’d want to eat this delicious decoration before we’d even finished hanging it on the tree. But then you’d have an excuse to cook up even more bacon!

[via That’s Nerdalicious!]

The inimitable Charles Phoenix (previously featured here) is, among many other marvelous things, a master of cooking up kitschy cuisine. His latest creation is this incredible Christmas Meatloaf of Santa Claus.
Christmas just got a whole lot creepier, meatier, and, of course, tastier. We love it.
[via Charles Phoenix]

The inimitable Charles Phoenix (previously featured here) is, among many other marvelous things, a master of cooking up kitschy cuisine. His latest creation is this incredible Christmas Meatloaf of Santa Claus.

Christmas just got a whole lot creepier, meatier, and, of course, tastier. We love it.

[via Charles Phoenix]

Tunafish may come in small cans, but the fish themselves are quite large. These tuna eyeballs help convey that fact. If you ever go shopping at a Japanese grocery store, you might encounter packages containing great big eyes staring right back at you.

Jesse of Flee Alaska, on a personal quest to try any and all unusual foodstuffs, documented his own experience with these massive fishy peepers. Here’s an excerpt:

"I was at the grocery store and I got the urge to eat something new. I looked around and I didn’t really see much until I found a food that could look back. It was only a hundred yen, which is less than a buck, so I figured I’d give it a whirl. It had a sticker on it that said that it should be cooked, but I didn’t really know how to cook it. I tried to find stuff online, but there aren’t a lot of English webpages devoted to eating fish eyes, so I just decided to boil it.

I didn’t use any flavoring so it just ended up smelling horribly fishy. There was a translucent, jelly-like ball inside that turned into a hard, white ball. It tasted a little like a hard-boiled egg does, so I’m guessing that it was mostly protein. It actually didn’t taste too bad.”

Visit Flee Alaska for more photos and Jesse’s complete description of his peculiar piscine feast.

[via io9, Tacky Raccoon, and Flee Alaska]

Century Eggs, also known as preserved eggs, hundred-year eggs, thousand-year eggs, and millennium eggs, are a Chinese delicacy. They’re made by preserving fresh duck, chicken, or quail eggs in a mixture of clay, ash, salt, quicklime, and rice hulls for several weeks to several months, depending on the method of processing.

"The process of “cooking” Century Eggs is believed to date back 600 years, when someone apparently found some old eggs preserved in a pool of slaked lime. Upon tasting them, he decided to produce some more, but this time with some added salt.

After the preservation is complete, the hull mixture and egg shell are removed to reveal the now dark-brown egg-white and a dark-green, creamy and pungent yolk.  It’s the alkaline that raises the ph of the egg from 9 to 12 or more and gives it a strong smell of ammonia and sulfur.”

These strangely beautiful and unsettling eggs are eaten raw and used as ingredients in other Chinese recipes. Some people liken consuming them to eating stinky cheese - smelly but also delicious.

Visit Oddity Central for many more photos.

[via Oddity Central and Telegraph.co.uk]

The next time you’re in Paris, if you get a hankering for something out of the ordinary, visit Le Festin nu (“The Naked Fest”), a bar and bistro in Montmartre where you can sit down to a meal of insect-based tapas. French chef Elie Daviron prepares the dishes, which include grasshoppers, worms, beetles, and scorpions.

Photos by Patrick Kovarik.

[via The Calgary Herald]