Today we learned about a species of moth made of cotton candy.

Okay, not really, but these beautiful creatures are still awesome, even if they aren’t made of spun sugar. This is the Rosy Maple Moth (Dryocampa rubicunda), a small North American moth most often found in southern Canada from Ontario to Nova Scotia. They live in deciduous forests and feed mainly on maple trees, but we suspect that some specimens prefer to follow traveling carnivals where they hover over the cotton candy machines.

Photos by Svdmolen, Rhododendrites, Kristi Decourcy, Patrick Spurlock, Ezra S F, MacroscopicSolutions, and Lynette Schimming respectively.

[via Neatorama]

Cotton candy is so sweet and yummy that we’ve always happily eaten it without paying any attention to the fact that it usually looks like the end of a giant cotton swab. That has all changed since we first watched this hypnotic video in which a skilled street vendor in Ciqikou, Chongqing, China creates servings of spun sugar that look like enormous, colourful flowers.

Great big, fluffy flowers of sugary awesomeness.

[via That’s Nerdalicious!]

The inestimably awesome Sir Patrick Stewart took this fantastic self-portrait in which he fashioned a piece of pink cotton candy into a fabulous mustache. We’re speechless with glee.
And if that wasn’t enough to put a smile on your face, click here to see him molding a larger piece of cotton candy into another self-portrait.
[via Neatorama]

The inestimably awesome Sir Patrick Stewart took this fantastic self-portrait in which he fashioned a piece of pink cotton candy into a fabulous mustache. We’re speechless with glee.

And if that wasn’t enough to put a smile on your face, click here to see him molding a larger piece of cotton candy into another self-portrait.

[via Neatorama]

New York-based artist Jennifer Rubell specializes in creating awesome, large-scale art installations using food. This sweet pink creation is a small, enclosed room with interior walls and ceiling completely lined with bricks of cotton candy. Yum! Entitled Padded Cell, the room was created in 2010 and was part of an event that took place on November 6, 2010 called “The Red Party.”

"Padded cell is an 8’X16’ freestanding room constructed of basic building materials, with a single door that contains a plexiglass window. Inside, the walls and ceilingare padded with pink cotton candy, and a bare light bulb hangs in the center. The door is opened at 9pm, but the interior is visible through the window throughout the evening. The Red Party’s main dinner is served inside a Russian-themed constructivist set, and Padded Cell acts as an escape from that, an all-American funhouse that is at the same time confining, threatening, claustrophobic. It is an object that addresses the dark side of pleasure, the price of pleasure, the possibility that pleasure is its own punishment. Approximately 1,800 cones of cotton candy are used in its construction."

Yep, we wish we could’ve played (and dined) inside of it too.

[via Design You Trust and Design Taxi]