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724 posts tagged Crafts

This awesome Interactive Origami Sculpture was created by Brasil-based origami artist Jo Nakashima, who’d been challenged to create something inspired by the fascinating Ghostcube system made by Swedish designer Erik Åberg. Nothing but paper and glue make up this interlocking system of 40 paper cubes.

If you’re feeling dexterous, Nakashima created a 45-step Instructables tutorial to help you make your very own kinetic origami sculpture.

He also runs an extraordinarily popular YouTube channel devoted to instructional origami videos, which is well worth a visit.

[via Colossal]

Philippines-based artist Jordan Mang-osan harnesses the power of the sun to create beautifully detailed works of pyrographic art. Pyrography (or pygrogravure) is the art of decorating wood or other materials with burn marks resulting from the controlled application of a heated object. For Mang-osan that object is a magnifying glass, which he uses to direct the heat of the sun to etch dark marks onto prepared sheets of plywood. He creates pieces that range from grand landscapes to detailed portraits. It’s a slow and painstaking process required great skill and patience. Each piece takes Mang-osan several months to complete.

"The artist, who is an ethnic Igorot hailing from the mountainous Cordilleras region, stays close to his roots by working with raw, indigenous materials and focusing on subject matter that celebrates the rich heritage of his people and his country.”

To check out more of his pyrography pieces, visit Jordan Mang-osan’s Facebook page or head over to Fine Art America,

[via Demilked and My Modern Metropolis]

Seattle-based artist Carol Milne knits with glass, or rather, she creates wonderful glass sculptures that make it seem as though she’s either a superhuman glass knitter or in possession of enchanted knitting needles and very specialized gloves. The reality is actually much more complicated, but no less awesome. Milne invented her glass knitting technique back in 2006. It’s a process that involves knitting with wax instead of glass, followed by lost-wax casting, mold-making and kiln-casting.

First, a model of the sculpture is made from wax which is then encased by a refractory mold material that can withstand extremely high temperatures. Next, hot steam is used to melt the wax, leaving behind an empty cavity in the shape of the artwork. Pieces of room temperature glass are then placed inside the mold which is then heated to 1,400-1,600 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the type of glass. Afterward, the piece is slowly cooled over a period of several weeks, followed by a careful excavation process, where Milne delicately chips away like an archaeologist to reveal the final piece.

To check out more of Carol Milne’s extraordinary artwork visit the Glass Art SocietyMilne’s Facebook page or her online gallery.

[via Colossal]

When Collen Kelton moved to Japan, where he was stationed with the US Military, he bought a silver 1995 Nissan Skyline GT-R with the intention of turning it into a souped-up speed machine. While he got to work on the insides of the car, Allison, Kelton’s then-girlfriend (now wife), started doodling intricate patterns on a scratched bumper with a black Sharpie marker. Kelton originally planned to eventually have the car repainted, so at first these doodles were simply an amusing way to pass the time.

But then, as hours and hours worth of drawing time accumulated, it became clear that Allison was turning the car into an awesome work of art. The couple decided to forgo the professional paint job in favor of Allison’s creative skills. After roughly 100 hours of painstaking work she’d covered every inch of the car’s exterior in a dazzlingly complex field of swirling patterns and lines. All that was left to do after that was cover the car with a few layers of protective clearcoat.

Collen Kelton documented the car’s transformation (inside and out) at the Skyline Owners Club forum. Head over there for additional images.

[via My Modern Metropolis and Demilked]

Here’s a deliciously sinister yet simple Halloween treat: Poison Toffee Apples by Alida Ryder of Simply Delicious Food. It takes just a few drops of black gel food coloring to give the candy coating on the apples that wonderfully wicked glossy black appearance.
Click here for the recipe and instructions.
[via Neatorama]

Here’s a deliciously sinister yet simple Halloween treat: Poison Toffee Apples by Alida Ryder of Simply Delicious Food. It takes just a few drops of black gel food coloring to give the candy coating on the apples that wonderfully wicked glossy black appearance.

Click here for the recipe and instructions.

[via Neatorama]

"There’s no star system Slave I can’t reach, and there’s no planet I can’t find. There’s nowhere in the galaxy for you to run. Might as well give up now."

LEGO + Star Wars = Super Awesome and this LEGO model of Slave I, Boba Fett’s Firespray-interceptor-class ship first seen in The Empire Strikes Back, is one of the most geektastically wonderful things we’ve ever seen.

But wait, this isn’t simply a one-of-a-kind model, it’s an official 1,995-piece LEGO model kit. This glorious replica of Slave I measures 7 inches (20cm) high, 17 inches (45cm) long and 14 inches (37cm) wide (in landing mode). Scaled for minifigs, the kit includes Boba Fett, Bespin Guard, Stormtrooper and Han Solo minifigs along with their weapons. And it gets even better still: also included is a minifig-sized Han Solo in carbonite.

Here are some additional features:

  • Rotating cockpit and wings, opening side hatches with hidden guns and missiles, 2 rotating dual shooters, cargo hold and a display stand with data sheet
  • Weapons include special blaster pistol for Boba Fett, blaster pistol for Bespin Guard and a blaster rifle for the Stormtrooper
  • Boba Fett and Bespin Guard minifigures are unique to this set
  • Rotate the cockpit and wings for flight and landing mode
  • Place carbonite-imprisoned Han Solo in the cargo hold
  • Open the side hatches to unleash missiles from the hidden guns
  • Display stand

This LEGO Star Wars Slave I kit is being released in January 2015. We don’t know about you, but we’re going to start writing our letter to Santa Claus right now.

[via Leg Godt]

The next time you don’t feel like eating your lunchtime apple, consider turning it into something terrifying instead. Redditor AirmanElmo used a razor to make shallow cuts in the shape of a face on his green apple. After leaving to dry in the sweltering Las Vegas summer heat for a week, the once green apple had become a seriously creepy shrunken head.
Imagine how a few shriveled faces like this, strategically placed in your Halloween candy bowl, would give trick-or-treaters a fun scare when they reach in to grab their sweets.
[via That’s Nerdalicious!]

The next time you don’t feel like eating your lunchtime apple, consider turning it into something terrifying instead. Redditor AirmanElmo used a razor to make shallow cuts in the shape of a face on his green apple. After leaving to dry in the sweltering Las Vegas summer heat for a week, the once green apple had become a seriously creepy shrunken head.

Imagine how a few shriveled faces like this, strategically placed in your Halloween candy bowl, would give trick-or-treaters a fun scare when they reach in to grab their sweets.

[via That’s Nerdalicious!]

Oh yeah! Duffman is here to refill your beer and satisfy your sweet tooth.

Spring Hill, FL-based artist Mallory Mae of ButterWinks created this awesomely elaborate Duffman iced butter cooke in the style of Czech Art Nouveau painter Alphonse Mucha. All of that glorious icing illustration was done by hand.

The cookie was created for Simpsononymous, a collaborative, Simpsons-themed edible art project celebrating the 25th anniversary of The Simpsons.

Click here to view more Simpsononymous creations.

[via Between the Pages]

"That’s no moon. It’s a space station."

We can’t decide what makes this stellar Star Wars-related cosplay more awesome: the phenomenal handmade Death Star Gown itself or the fact that it’s been accessorized with a Star Destroyer purse equipped to play Star Wars sound effects.

According to her husband Lady Death Star spent over 100 hours working on her spectacular gown. Everything was made by hand with the minor exceptions of the rank badge and the tin detail on her hat. The illuminated skirt weighs over 20 pounds. 10 pounds of that weight comes from the steel hoops that give the skirt its shape. There are also 12 D batteries powering 300 LED lights, and two skirts - an underskirt containing the steel hoops and the Death Star top skirt featuring roughly 900 foam tiles.

Visit Lady Death Star’s project blog for lots of process photos and to learn about how this fantastic gown was made.

Top photo taken by Undiscovered Photography at the Edmonton Expo.
Second photo taken by the 501st Legion at the Calgary Expo.

[via io9 and Fashionably Geek]

70-year-old Xu Shuquan is a retired primary school teacher from the city of Chengdu in Sichuan province who has spent the past 60 years practicing Zhezhi, the traditional Chinese art of paper folding. Shugan has been folding paper planes since he was 10 years old and has amassed an awesome collection of 10,000 paper planes of various sizes, shapes and colors. Unlike Japanese origami, which primarily focuses on creating animals and flowers, Chinese paper folding concentrates mainly on objects, such as boats, hats, or in this case, airplanes.

…Xu put his knowledge of Zhezhi to good use during his teaching career: “When children were naughty or not paying attention, I would get their attention by folding a simple paper dart with a message on it and flying it to them,” he said. “The planes got more and more complicated and the children seemed to love them.” The trick would backfire at times because his students loved the planes so much that they would create a ruckus on purpose.

Shuquan hopes to hold an exhibition of his Zhezhi creations in hopes of reviving an art form which he feels has been eclipsed in the western world by Japanese origami.

“My biggest hope is to hold my own exhibition where people can learn more about the traditional art.”

[via Oddity Central]