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706 posts tagged Crafts

Feast your eyes on this mouthwatering entirely condiment-based portrait of the inimitably awesome Sir Patrick Stewart as Captain Jean-Luc Picard. It was painted by artist Jennifer Marshall using ketchup, mustard, hoisin sauce and bleu cheese sauce. “Commander Data, please bring the veggie tray. Number One, you’re in charge of supplying the tater tots. Commander Worf has the onion rings. Snacks raised everyone? Engage.”
[via Geek Crafts]

Feast your eyes on this mouthwatering entirely condiment-based portrait of the inimitably awesome Sir Patrick Stewart as Captain Jean-Luc Picard. It was painted by artist Jennifer Marshall using ketchup, mustard, hoisin sauce and bleu cheese sauce. “Commander Data, please bring the veggie tray. Number One, you’re in charge of supplying the tater tots. Commander Worf has the onion rings. Snacks raised everyone? Engage.”

[via Geek Crafts]

This awesome Salacious B. Crumb purse was created by Astoria, New York-based artist Cat Penfold, who used her painting skills to give the leather purse a geektastic makeover. This excellent likeness of Jabba the Hutt’s naughty Kowakian monkey-lizard comes without the little jester’s shrill cackle. In fact, every time he opens his mouth, it’s only so that you can shove something into or pull something out of it, which sounds really cathartic.

This Salacious Crumb Purse is currently available here via Cat Penfold’s Knit One, Pearl Two Etsy shop.

[via Technabob]

Last month we shared a fantastic Cyberman Cake created by Welsh bespoke bakery Happy Occasions Cakes. Just in time for the triumphant return of the Doctor, Happy Occasions is back with to challenge our Whovian survival instinct anew with this terrifyingly awesome Dalek cake, complete with a light-up eyestalk and illuminated base. It’s sure to exterminate your appetite and, if you keep on eating, perhaps blast a few cavities into your teeth as well.

Visit the Happy Occasions Cakes Facebook Page to check out more of their amazing custom cakes.

[via That’s Nerdalicious!]

In Japan you can enjoy your favorite anime, cartoon and video game characters as more than simply visual entertainment. They’re also available as sweet treats. These kawaii confections are a form of wagashi (和菓子) called nerikiri (練り切り). Made from white bean paste and rice-based dough, nerikiri are often tinted and molded similar to how marzipan is prepared in Western desserts.

These pop culture-inspired nerikiri were all made by Japanese Twitter user Otakumi at a wagashi shop called Kuramoto Hinode, which is located in the Tokushima Prefecture of Japan’s Shikoku island.

Follow Otakumi’s Twitter feed

You can also try your hand at making your very own nerikiri. Click here for the recipe.

[via Kotaku]

Cammi Upton is an artist and self-proclaimed “cryptofluffologist” who creates awesomely detailed hand-embroidered movie monsters. Her process is incredibly painstaking, but the fantastically ghastly results she achieves groan growl howl speak for themselves.

I start by blocking out the piece in a few different colors of felt and then I cover the entire piece in stitches with sewing and embroidery thread. It’s an extremely time consuming process since I do it all by hand. I bring them with me everywhere in the hopes that I’ll get a chance to work on them!

Head over to Cammi Upton’s website or follow her Instagram account to check out more of her monstrous art and other works of Cryptofluff.

[via Make:Craft]

The leaf pictured at the top of this post isn’t a leaf at all. It’s made of paper and is an exquisite example of the Japanese art of papercutting is called Kirie (切り絵, meaning ‘cut paper’). All of the extraordinarily delicate examples of the Kirie seen here were handmade by a self-taught Japanese artist named Akira Nagaya, whose skills were first discovered about 30 years ago while he was working in a sushi shop.

"One of his first tasks was to learn sasabaran, a technique to create decorations by cutting slices into bamboo leaves. Back at home, and recalling his boss’s demonstration, Nagaya tried to practice using paper and a utility knife. He found that the technique came quite naturally, and he enjoyed doing it.”

Years later Nagaya was still making his intricate paper objects when he opened his very own restaurant and decided to display his kirie “for fun.” When a local newspaper showed up to review his restaurant they spotted his creations and encouraged him to display them in a gallery.

“That was the first time I even considered what I had been doing as art,” recalls Nagaya.

Head over to Akira Nagaya’s Facebook page to check out many more of his marvelous cut paper creations.

[via Spoon & Tamago]

Do any of these photos make you hungry? If so, we really hope you brought your own lunch, because nothing that you see here is actually food. These images are part of a still life photo series by Melbourne-based artist and photography student TQ Lee. Entitled Inedible, each photo depicts a tasty meal or enticing treat made of indigestible ingredients such as LEGO bricks, telephone cord, papier-mâché, makeup pads and hot shaving cream. After happily not feasting on any of it, you can refuse to wash it all down with glasses of Betadine, turpentine or waxed rolled socks.

Here Lee describes his series:

"As a child of the 80s I grew up with fond memories of still-life, photographic prints of breads, pastas, fruit and vegetables captured in the literal style of the era. The pictures hung in the houses of my family and friends and I would spend hours identifying all the ingredients and looking at every detail.

Nowadays, the humble still life has grown out of favour. Instead, colourful, reprinted advertisements of vintage European beverages add smiles to kitchen walls across Australia. And so, I challenged myself to put a contemporary twist on the food art trend of the 80s. This resulted in my series Inedible - photos of food made from unconventional ingredients.”

Head over to TQ Lee’s website to explore more of his playful creative endeavors or follow him right here on Tumblr at tqlee.

[via Laughing Squid]

Bristol, England-based professional photographer Justin Quinnell turned his own mouth into a pinhole camera. He built a tiny camera using aluminum foil and a 110 film cartridge and takes awesomely unusual photos with the device inside his mouth, held in place by his back teeth. Quinnell uses his homemade camera to take tonsil-vision shots of everything from scenic travel destinations, his own feet soaking in the bathtub, a visit to the dentist and even the nightmarish image of a dead spider resting on his toothbrush as it enters his mouth. Basically he photographs anything that he thinks will make his kids laugh.

Sometimes he had to hold his mouth open, standing still, in front of his target for up to a minute for the film to be properly exposed

He said: ‘I originally invented the camera for its indestructibility, throwing it off buildings and things like that. It was after a few months of using it this way I for some reason pushed it into my mouth. Three years of Degree level photographic theory rushed through my brain and mouthy imagery evolved.’

Visit Justin Quinnell’s website to check out more of his wonderfully peculiar oral pinhole photography.

[via 22 Words and the Daily Mail]

This exquisitely, scrumptiously detailed Library Cake was made by Kathy Knaus. One side features the entrance to the brick library building, flanked by potted plants. The other side reveals the library’s cozy interior, complete with countless books lining its double-decker shelves, a large globe, and a wonderfully cluttered reading table accented with gum drop lamps.
Libraries are awesome places and cake is one of the best things ever, so this sweet, edible library is extra-mega-super-duper awesome.
[via That’s Nerdalicious!]

This exquisitely, scrumptiously detailed Library Cake was made by Kathy Knaus. One side features the entrance to the brick library building, flanked by potted plants. The other side reveals the library’s cozy interior, complete with countless books lining its double-decker shelves, a large globe, and a wonderfully cluttered reading table accented with gum drop lamps.

Libraries are awesome places and cake is one of the best things ever, so this sweet, edible library is extra-mega-super-duper awesome.

[via That’s Nerdalicious!]

Here’s some electrifyingly awesome fashion design that would’ve made Nikola Tesla proud. Dutch designer Anouk Wipprecht created (and modeled) this stunning Faraday Cage Dress, a metal garment capable of conducting nearly one million volts of electricity. The dress is made of metal plates, 600 rings of chain mail, plasma ball epaulets and a helmet covered in metal spikes with a protective face grill.

To construct and successfully model the dress Wipprecht collaborated with ArcAttack, an Austin, TX-based performance art group who use Tesla coils and Faraday suits as part of their act. Wipprecht modeled her Faraday Cage Dress in a dazzling performance at the 2014 Bay Area Maker Faire in May:

"Standing stalwartly between a pair of Tesla coils, electricity arcing around her to the strains of In the Hall of the Mountain King by ArcAttack, Wipprecht remained safe in the confines of her homemade Faraday cage, which distributed the electrical charge around its exterior while shielding the contents within.”

Click here for video footage of the performance, including Anouk Wipprecht’s perspective from inside the suit.

If you’re interested in knowing more about how this phenomenal garment was made, Wipprecht wrote all about it in a detailed Instructables post entitled “How to Get Fashionably Struck by Lightning.” However she cautions amateurs against trying to reproduce the dress one their own:

"If the arcs raise through your heart, you might not live to tell, so if anything, this process was done very carefully," she said. "ArcAttack have been doing this for over 12 years and are specialists in their field."

Head over to Instructables to learn more about this astounding project.

[via Inhabitat and ecouterre]