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699 posts tagged Crafts

Bristol, England-based professional photographer Justin Quinnell turned his own mouth into a pinhole camera. He built a tiny camera using aluminum foil and a 110 film cartridge and takes awesomely unusual photos with the device inside his mouth, held in place by his back teeth. Quinnell uses his homemade camera to take tonsil-vision shots of everything from scenic travel destinations, his own feet soaking in the bathtub, a visit to the dentist and even the nightmarish image of a dead spider resting on his toothbrush as it enters his mouth. Basically he photographs anything that he thinks will make his kids laugh.

Sometimes he had to hold his mouth open, standing still, in front of his target for up to a minute for the film to be properly exposed

He said: ‘I originally invented the camera for its indestructibility, throwing it off buildings and things like that. It was after a few months of using it this way I for some reason pushed it into my mouth. Three years of Degree level photographic theory rushed through my brain and mouthy imagery evolved.’

Visit Justin Quinnell’s website to check out more of his wonderfully peculiar oral pinhole photography.

[via 22 Words and the Daily Mail]

This exquisitely, scrumptiously detailed Library Cake was made by Kathy Knaus. One side features the entrance to the brick library building, flanked by potted plants. The other side reveals the library’s cozy interior, complete with countless books lining its double-decker shelves, a large globe, and a wonderfully cluttered reading table accented with gum drop lamps.
Libraries are awesome places and cake is one of the best things ever, so this sweet, edible library is extra-mega-super-duper awesome.
[via That’s Nerdalicious!]

This exquisitely, scrumptiously detailed Library Cake was made by Kathy Knaus. One side features the entrance to the brick library building, flanked by potted plants. The other side reveals the library’s cozy interior, complete with countless books lining its double-decker shelves, a large globe, and a wonderfully cluttered reading table accented with gum drop lamps.

Libraries are awesome places and cake is one of the best things ever, so this sweet, edible library is extra-mega-super-duper awesome.

[via That’s Nerdalicious!]

Here’s some electrifyingly awesome fashion design that would’ve made Nikola Tesla proud. Dutch designer Anouk Wipprecht created (and modeled) this stunning Faraday Cage Dress, a metal garment capable of conducting nearly one million volts of electricity. The dress is made of metal plates, 600 rings of chain mail, plasma ball epaulets and a helmet covered in metal spikes with a protective face grill.

To construct and successfully model the dress Wipprecht collaborated with ArcAttack, an Austin, TX-based performance art group who use Tesla coils and Faraday suits as part of their act. Wipprecht modeled her Faraday Cage Dress in a dazzling performance at the 2014 Bay Area Maker Faire in May:

"Standing stalwartly between a pair of Tesla coils, electricity arcing around her to the strains of In the Hall of the Mountain King by ArcAttack, Wipprecht remained safe in the confines of her homemade Faraday cage, which distributed the electrical charge around its exterior while shielding the contents within.”

Click here for video footage of the performance, including Anouk Wipprecht’s perspective from inside the suit.

If you’re interested in knowing more about how this phenomenal garment was made, Wipprecht wrote all about it in a detailed Instructables post entitled “How to Get Fashionably Struck by Lightning.” However she cautions amateurs against trying to reproduce the dress one their own:

"If the arcs raise through your heart, you might not live to tell, so if anything, this process was done very carefully," she said. "ArcAttack have been doing this for over 12 years and are specialists in their field."

Head over to Instructables to learn more about this astounding project.

[via Inhabitat and ecouterre]

Buffalo, New York-based paper artist Maude White painstakingly hand-cuts exquisite depictions of animals (particularly birds), people, leaves and other subjects. Each piece requires thousands of precise, tiny cuts, and some of them contain even more delicate images hidden within the larger designs.

"I have great respect for paper. When I cut, the thin membranous material reveals its strength to me. No matter how small my cuts the paper holds. There is a certain comfort in that, a comfort I enjoy. I feel that there are very few things in the world as reliable and constant as paper. Paper is everywhere and it has been telling stories for centuries. By respecting and honoring paper for what it is, and not considering it a stepping-stone to something greater, I feel like I am communicating some of the pleasure it brings to me. I am not creating for Art’s sake. I am creating for Paper’s sake, to make visible the stories that every piece of paper attempts to communicate to us."

In September 2014 Maude White will be showing some of her work at the Western New York Book Arts Collaborative as part of an exhibition entitled Birds I’ve Been.

To check out more of her work, visit White’s online portfolio and keep up with her latest creations, including fascinating process photos, via her Instagram acount. She also offers some of her creations for purchase via Etsy at Brave Bird Paperwork.

[via Colossal]

Plenty of people know how to crochet and knit, but how many of them do it underwater? Polish yarn-bombing artist Olek (previously featured here) recently undertook an awesome new artistic adventure in the Caribbeans creating an installation in the waters off Isla Mujeres, Mexico off the coast of Cancun, home to a large population of whale sharks. To voice her concern about the ongoing decline of the global shark population, Olek used her signature vibrant camouflage-patterned crochet to cover two sculptures in Isla Mujeres’ underwater museum, Museo Subacuatico de Arte (MUSA).

The MUSA is an underwater sculpture park created to encourage the natural growth of coral reefs and has been open to the public since 2010 (though scuba diving skills are a must to be able to go see it).

For the project, Olek used safe, biodegradable materials and colors that mimic the reds, yellows and browns of the coral reef. The artist was inspired by a quote from Jason DeCaires Taylor, the original sculptor of the pieces in the MUSA, comparing the global oceans’ health to a ticking time bomb as ecosystems decline from overfishing and pollution. She specifically chose to crochet the bomb sculptures as a symbol of solidarity and call for environmental protection.

After finishing the installation Olek collaborated with Tre Packard of Pangeaseed on a stunning underwater photo shoot of divers wearing crocheted mermaid tails, bodysuits and butterfly wings.

Visit Hi-Fructose for additional images.

[via Hi-Fructose]

Stare too long into the fiery eyes of this awesome Darth Vader wood-burning stove and you might start to hear the voice of Emperor Palpatine in your head. This geektastic appliance was created by Barnsley, England-based Instructables member doddieszoomer, which means that we can all learn how to make one too. It all starts with an empty propane tank and some scrap iron. Telepathy and psychokinesis are completely optional.

Click here for complete Vader Gas Bottle Log Burner build instructions.

[via Technabob]

We are Groot!

The Internets have been gleefully infected with Baby Groot Fever. Redditor theoopst shared the top image of an awesomely adorable sculpture, made by their friend artist combatcarlie, of wee Baby Groot happily dancing in his pot.

Below that you see another homemade baby Groot, this one made by artist Patrick Delahanty using an electronic dancing flower toy:

"I made this using a “Movin’ & Groovin’” flower I got from eBay, cut off the dumb daisy, and covered the stem on felt and twine. My fiancée sculpted the head from Model Magic. We then painted everything with brown and tan paint. He can now dance to Peter Quill’s “Awesome Mix”…or to my own mix.”

Click here to watch baby Groot dance and then click here for complete instructions to make your own.

If this little guy doesn’t make any sense to you, please stop what you’re doing and go see Guardians of the Galaxy. Pretty much everything else can wait.

[via Reddit, Mark’s Scrapbook and Neatorama]


"After vigintillions of years great Cthulhu was loose again, and ravening for delight."

Wherever you happen to be when Dread Cthulhu finally emerges from his deep slumber, if you’re lucky, you won’t be there long.
This geektastic piece of embroidery, emblazoned with the wish plea “May Cthulhu take this house first,” was recently given to Maika, co-editor of the Geyser of Awesome, to hang near her Cthulhumas tree. It was created by Brita, a Portland, OR-based craftstress, in hopes that the tentacular Great Old One won’t take our annual celebration of Cthulhumas as a sign of disrespect.
Ph’nglui mglw’nafh Cthulhu R’lyeh wgah’nagl fhtagn

"After vigintillions of years great Cthulhu was loose again, and ravening for delight."

Wherever you happen to be when Dread Cthulhu finally emerges from his deep slumber, if you’re lucky, you won’t be there long.

This geektastic piece of embroidery, emblazoned with the wish plea “May Cthulhu take this house first,” was recently given to Maika, co-editor of the Geyser of Awesome, to hang near her Cthulhumas tree. It was created by Brita, a Portland, OR-based craftstress, in hopes that the tentacular Great Old One won’t take our annual celebration of Cthulhumas as a sign of disrespect.

Ph’nglui mglw’nafh Cthulhu R’lyeh wgah’nagl fhtagn

Most guinea pigs spend their days simply being impossibly cute and eating as many vegetables and as much hay as they possibly can. Pulguinha the Steampunk Guinea Pig does all of those things while wearing an awesome pair of brass and leather wings. We hope she sometimes gets to hang out with a guinea pig wearing scale-mail armor as well.

Pulguinha’s fantastic harness was created by Silvia Ferreira’s SkyPirate Creations, Porto, Portugal-based makers of alternative clothing, leather and other crafts.

To see more of Pulguinha and the work of SkyPirate Creations, visit their Facebook page. Many of their Steampunk wares are available for purchase via Rebels Market, Storenvy and Etsy.

[via io9]

Today the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders was delighted to learn about the work of Buckinghamshire, England-based illustrator Chloe Giordano, who uses freehand embroidery to create incredibly small, yet finely detailed depictions of animals.

The final works of a sleeping fawn or mouse are scarcely larger than the size of a thimble, yet can take long periods of time to complete as she mixes myriad thread colors to achieve perfection for each piece.

In addition to wonderfully wee embroidered pieces like those pictured here, Giordano also creates 3D sculptures. You can keep up with all of Chloe Giordano’s artwork right here on Tumblr at karenin. She’s currently available for comission-based work as well.

[via Colossal]