Spanish street artist Pejac (previously featured here), skilled at making use of the urban landscape, recently paid a visit to Paris where he cleverly transformed a long crack in a wall into a wavy, dreamlike door, ever so slightly ajar. We can’t guarantee that it’s a gateway to Narnia, but - if you can get it open - we suspect this door leads somewhere awesome.

Visit Pejac’s website to check out more of his fantastic street art interventions.

[via StreetArtNews]

The leaf pictured at the top of this post isn’t a leaf at all. It’s made of paper and is an exquisite example of the Japanese art of papercutting is called Kirie (切り絵, meaning ‘cut paper’). All of the extraordinarily delicate examples of the Kirie seen here were handmade by a self-taught Japanese artist named Akira Nagaya, whose skills were first discovered about 30 years ago while he was working in a sushi shop.

"One of his first tasks was to learn sasabaran, a technique to create decorations by cutting slices into bamboo leaves. Back at home, and recalling his boss’s demonstration, Nagaya tried to practice using paper and a utility knife. He found that the technique came quite naturally, and he enjoyed doing it.”

Years later Nagaya was still making his intricate paper objects when he opened his very own restaurant and decided to display his kirie “for fun.” When a local newspaper showed up to review his restaurant they spotted his creations and encouraged him to display them in a gallery.

“That was the first time I even considered what I had been doing as art,” recalls Nagaya.

Head over to Akira Nagaya’s Facebook page to check out many more of his marvelous cut paper creations.

[via Spoon & Tamago]

A few months ago we shared some of S. Morita’s photos of Japan’s beautifully decorated manhole covers. In Japan there’s an official Society of Manhole Covers and this sort of urban beautification is a municipal responsibility. Today we learned that even though China has no such system in place, a 24-year-old art graduate named Hu Yifan is taking it upon himself to decorate the manhole covers in his neighborhood. So far Yifan has painted over 30 manhole covers in the Xiaodian district of Taiyuan, capital of Northwest China’s Shanxi province. Sometimes he simply paints a fun, colorful image on the cover, while other times he uses the covers to create larger pieces on the street. China is an enormous country with countless manhole covers, so we hope this is just the beginning of a delightful decoration process.

Photos by Wu Junjie/ China News Service

[via RocketNews24 and China News Service]

Markus1984 built this awesomely elaborate LEGO Steampunk AT-AT for round three of the MOC Madness 2014 Steam Wars competition. Because it’s part of an ongoing competition, Markus had only seven days to build this walker, which makes its many details that much more impressive. It even features two little minifigs hard at work stoking the engine. The walker appears to be a well-oiled machine from top to bottom, but that devoted crew is still doomed if the walker falls over.

Click here to check out more entries from the competition.

[via Nerd Approved and Kotaku]

Canadian artist Maskull Lasserre (previously featured here) has recently been “re-carving” mass-produced wooden souvenir sculptures and decoys to reveal intricate an skeletal system beneath each sculpture’s wooden skin.

These fascinating reworked wooden sculptures remind us of the dissected sculptures created by New York-based artist Jason Freeny (previously featured here).

Visit Maskull Lasserre’s online portfolio to check out more of his amazing artwork.

[via Colossal]

As creators of a Giant Wooden Pencil (that actually writes) we love this awesome HB Lamp created by London-based design team Michael & George. The six-foot-tall, handmade pencil lamp features a 33-foot-long cord emerging from the tip of the pencil, which enables users to make it appear as though they’ve scribbled all over the room (and even the walls if you’re clever with a few small hooks).

They say, “our hope is to inspire light bulb moments within everyone who comes in to contact with the ‘HB Lamp’ (just as the traditional HB pencil has been the conduit to so many light bulb moments throughout history.)”

This delightful device is the first piece ins Michael & George’s new series of Stationery Objects, which sees them turning everyday office supplies into playful, yet useful design pieces. The duo also created a Mini HB Lamp (bottom photo), which stands 40 cm (15 in) tall.

Michael & George will be showing off their HB Lamp with an installation at this year’s London Design Festival on September 12, 2014.

[via Neatorama and Inhabitat]

Let’s take a moment to appreciate some awesome new lifelike painted resin depictions of aquatic animals by Singapore-based artist Keng Lye (previously featured here). The longer we look at them, the harder it is to believe that these aren’t simply photos of live fish swimming in water. In reality they’re the result of the gradual layering of painstakingly applied acrylic paint on clear resin, part painting and part sculpture. The only things here that aren’t rendered in paint are the repurposed containers.

Head over to Keng Lye’s Facebook page to check out even more of his recent creations.

[via Colossal]