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635 posts tagged Cute

The latest addition to the Archie McPhee Library is a must-have for any Crazy Cat Lady. Entitled Fashion Cats [Buy on Amazon], it was compiled by Japanese photographer Takako Iwasa, “Japan’s #1 Cat Tailor,” who used his own adorable cats, Prin and Koutaro, as kitty supermodels to document fashion trends for fabulous felines.

"Prin and Koutaro are two cats who don’t get out of bed for less than the best catnip and 10,000 American dollars. They aren’t just cute, they are extraordinarily cute and know how to make Haute Cature look as good as it should. Here they don the latest Japanese Spring, Summer, Fall, and Winter collections, featuring gorgeous, flowered paw bracelets, lace veils, tuxedo fronts, wool capes with matching caps, and much more.:

It’s 160 pages of nonstop kitty couture that’s guaranteed to brighten the gloomiest day.

[Images via Design Taxi and Design Faves]

This awesomely cute and geeky video depicts a day in the life of a pet AT-AT. It was created in 2010 by Patrick Boivin, a self-taught French Canadian filmmaker who says, “When I was a kid, there are two things I wanted badly and never got… A real dog and a Kenner AT-AT Walker.” Here Boivin has taken care of both of those desires with “AT-AT Day Afternoon.”

Pet AT-ATs are a much smaller and decidedly more playful and cuddly breed than the sort that participated in the Battle of Hoth, although the little guys do appear to have it in for the squirrels. Also, should you consider adopting a pet AT-AT, be forewarned that their droppings are exceptionally, well, villainous.

Visit Patrick Boivin’s YouTube channel to check out more of his videos.

[via io9]

Lucky Dog Day Camp in Kalispell, MT had a birthday party and used our glasses in their photo booth. Bailey and Bailee look fantastic in our Googly Eyes Glasses, Moose is enchanting in Hypno Glasses, Tank looks Marxian in our Disguise Glasses, Doris is fantastically feline in our Cat Eye Glasses and Milo is animated in our Anime Glasses. We hope we get invited next time! We’ll bring the kibble.

See more cuteness here!

Source facebook.com

This adorable little hedgehog was made using almonds, eggs, cream, sugar and then even more almonds. We love him, not just because he’s so cute, but because he was created using a recipe that was written all the way back in 1817. Think about that for a second. What that means is that even 200 years ago people were coming up with novelty treats and edible sculptures shaped like ridiculously cute animals.
The recipe comes from a book entitled Treatise on Confectionary, written by Joseph Bell. Here it is:

To make a Hedge Hog.
Take 1lb. Valentia almonds; blanch and beat them very fine, with a little rose water; mix in the yolks of six eggs; whisk up the whites of four eggs very stiff; mix all together, with half a pint of cream, and sweeten it with beat sugar to your taste; set the whole in a stew pan on a clear fire, and stir it till it is thick enough to model into the shape of a hedge hog; put a small currant for each eye, and stick it all over with cut almonds for the bristles of the hedge hog; then set it on a dish, and pour over it a rich custard.

It’s actually possible that this recipe is even older still. It may be a reprint from this 1747 source. So the next time you find yourself daydreaming about 18th/19th century banquets, as we know some of you sometimes do, don’t forget to include the ornamental, edible almond hedgehog.
[via TYWKIWDBI and Echoes from the Vault]

This adorable little hedgehog was made using almonds, eggs, cream, sugar and then even more almonds. We love him, not just because he’s so cute, but because he was created using a recipe that was written all the way back in 1817. Think about that for a second. What that means is that even 200 years ago people were coming up with novelty treats and edible sculptures shaped like ridiculously cute animals.

The recipe comes from a book entitled Treatise on Confectionary, written by Joseph Bell. Here it is:

To make a Hedge Hog.

Take 1lb. Valentia almonds; blanch and beat them very fine, with a little rose water; mix in the yolks of six eggs; whisk up the whites of four eggs very stiff; mix all together, with half a pint of cream, and sweeten it with beat sugar to your taste; set the whole in a stew pan on a clear fire, and stir it till it is thick enough to model into the shape of a hedge hog; put a small currant for each eye, and stick it all over with cut almonds for the bristles of the hedge hog; then set it on a dish, and pour over it a rich custard.

It’s actually possible that this recipe is even older still. It may be a reprint from this 1747 source. So the next time you find yourself daydreaming about 18th/19th century banquets, as we know some of you sometimes do, don’t forget to include the ornamental, edible almond hedgehog.

[via TYWKIWDBI and Echoes from the Vault]

We just discovered an awesome new addition to our collection of reinterpretations of The Gashlycrumb Tinies by the one and only Edward Gorey. Instead of an alphabet of ill-fated kiddies, the creators of Brentalfloss have chosen to depict the deaths of familiar video game characters. Behold “The Game Over Tinies.”

The Brentalfloss website appears to be down at the moment, but you can get a closer look at each geektastically macabre panel in this morbidly delightful music video. Poor Aerith, we still miss her terribly…

Prints of “The Game Over Tinies” can be purchased here, courtesy of Level Up Studios.

[via Nerdist]

All babies are small compared to their parents, but there is something particularly awesome about the size difference between this proud mama Galápagos Tortoise and her tiny new hatchlings, who emerged from their shells back in January 2014 at Australia’s Taronga Western Plains Zoo. This zoo became the first in Australia to successfully breed Galápagos Tortoises when RJ, the slightly larger baby you see standing between the wee hatchlings and parent, hatched three years ago.

One of the longest-living vertebrates, Galápagos Tortoises can live for over 100 years in the wild and reach weights of around 880 pounds (400 kg) and lenghths of up to 5 feet (1.5 m). They are found only on the Galápagos archipelago, west of continental Ecuador.

Head over to ZooBorns for additional photos and to learn more about Galápagos Tortoises.

Because it’s been many months since we first made the discovery, as a public service the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders would like to remind everyone that baby Horseshoe Crabs are incredibly small and awesomely cute. The wee hatchlings in these photos are baby Atlantic Horseshoe Crabs (Limulus polyphemus).

"Atlantic Horseshoe Crabs lay eggs 2,000 to 30,000 eggs, which hatch approximately 2 weeks later. Hatchlings stay in tidal areas for about a year before traveling into deeper areas of the ocean."

These little ones were recently collected from local tidal areas by husbandry staff from the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores. They’ll be kept under quarantine for one month and then moved to the aquarium’s invertebrate touch tanks.

[via ZooBorns]

French artist and freelance illustrator Gilbert Legrand has spent the last 10 years transforming everyday household objects into delightful character sculptures. A pair of scissors becomes an amorous couple, a folding ruler is a choral quintet, a toilet brush is a bushy-maned lion and a clothes hanger becomes a laid-back, denim-wearing rat. We love the awesomely whimsical way Legrand sees the world.

Visit Gilbert Legrand’s website to view more of his playful sculptures.

[via Demilked and Visual News]

The Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders invites you to pick up a pencil and consider the size of its eraser as you look at this amazing photo of wee baby poison dart frog taken by Andrew Cowie at the London Aquarium. The recently born baby frog is an endangered species and the first ever to be born at London’s aquarium.
Did you know that baby frogs (recently developed from tadpoles) are called froglets? The name is nearly as cute as the tiny amphibians themselves.
[via Telegraph.co.uk]

The Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders invites you to pick up a pencil and consider the size of its eraser as you look at this amazing photo of wee baby poison dart frog taken by Andrew Cowie at the London Aquarium. The recently born baby frog is an endangered species and the first ever to be born at London’s aquarium.

Did you know that baby frogs (recently developed from tadpoles) are called froglets? The name is nearly as cute as the tiny amphibians themselves.

[via Telegraph.co.uk]