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1009 posts tagged Design

German artist Evelyn Bracklow of La Philie (previously featured here) has created another awesomely unsettling collection of beautiful vintage porcelain dishes and tableware covered in swarms of tiny hand-painted ants.

"Many of the new pieces are part of a unique partnership between the artist, Rijks Museum in the Netherlands, and Etsy. The pieces are hand-painted in Bracklow’s studio, signed, numbered and fired to 160 degrees.”

Each delicate, one-of-a-kind piece is as exquisite as it is utterly repulsive. Some of these pieces (and more) are currently available for purchase via the La Philie Etsy shop.

[via Colossal]

What is this? A center for ants?!

Today the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders is delighted to share Postcards for Ants, an awesome ongoing project by Cape Town, South Africa-based artist Lorraine Loots. Every day Loot creates one exquisitely detailed and utterly itty-bitty painting. The project began on January 1, 2013 as a personal 365-day challenge, which means she’d created hundreds of these amazing miniature works of art.

When Cape Town was designated as the World Design Capital 2014, Loot decided to do a second year of tiny paintings, 365 Postcards for Ants, this time using her home city as the theme for each piece. Although each original painting has already been spoken for, Loot creates 5 prints of each day’s painting, which can be ordered through the project website.

To view more of Postcards for Ants visit Lorraine Loots’s website or follow her on Instagram, Facebook or right here on Tumblr at paintingsforants.

[via WHUDAT and Bored Panda]

Smart people have all kinds of delicious stuff in their heads! Well, now you can eat it. You can get Edgar Allan Poe, William Shakespeare or Sigmund Freud candy in a book-shaped package. Each wrapper has the face of the genius on it. Shakespeare tastes like lemon, Poe is grape and for some mysterious reason Freud reminded us of bananas. Food for thinkers! Looks great on a bookshelf.

Buy them here

Source mcphee.com

London designer Dominic Wilcox just unveiled his visionary concept for the future of transportation. Behold the beautiful Stained Glass Driverless Sleeper Car of the Future. Traveling in this beautiful vehicle must be like taking a ride inside a giant Fabergé egg, which, of course, sounds incredibly awesome.

Wilcox presented his driverless glass car prototype at the London Design Festival 2014:

"In the future it will be safer to drive in a driverless car than it will in a manual car," said Wilcox. "Therefore we don’t need the protection systems that are built into contemporary cars. We can just have a shell of any design."

The designer imagined a future where all cars were controlled by computers that would eliminate collisions and accidents, meaning everyday vehicles would no longer need to be designed for safety.

Wilcox proposes that a perfectly safe self-driving car is a car that can be made out of something as fragile as glass and used as, in the case of this prototype, a sleeper car. It contains a cozy bed in which the rider can sleep while being driven to their destination. But there are many other possibilities besides a mobile bedroom. Liberated from the responsibility of driving, people could have cars that served as mobile offices, gyms, dining rooms, or lounges. The only limits are your imagination and, of course, your budget.

In addition to unveiling this daring prototype, Wilcox also launched a concept website, called TaxiRobot, where users can customize and order their own driverless cars for a variety of functions and featuring all sorts creative exterior designs.

Click here to watch a video about Dominic Wilcox and his stained-glass driverless car.

Photos by Sylvain Deleu

Head over to Dezeen for additional information about this fabulous futuristic concept car.

Houston, TX-based artist Nikita DevilxKat Leigh of Midian Craftworks created this awesome stained glass Stormtrooper Helmet Table Lamp. Even Emperor Palpatine himself would be impressed with this life-size sculpture made of 521 pieces of hand-cut glass, copper foil, 5-6 lbs of solder and probably some blood, sweat and Jedi tears to boot.

"After the glass was cut, the edges were ground down and each piece was wrapped in copper foil. I then soldered the pieces together, gave the helmet a good cleaning, patinated the solder black, and finally gave everything a nice waxing to polish the metal and make the glass shine! This piece has also been signed and dated.

The helmet itself measures approximately 12 x 12 x12 (inches). Included with the table lamp is a wooden base and a 6 foot lamp cord with a candelabra snap-in socket, rocker switch, and bulb. 40 watt bulbs are the maximum recommended.”

Despite what the top photo depicts, this fantastic piece of home decor isn’t intended to be worn by live humans. It’s quite heavy and fragile, but it does make for an awesome portrait. Currently available for purchase here.

Visit the Midian Craftworks Etsy shop for more geektastic stained glass creations and other crafts perfect for your “Dark & Dork Side.”

[via Technabob]

Whether you’re waiting in line for the new iPhone or hiding in the woods waiting to capture proof of the existence of Bigfoot, it’s crucial that you’re able to get some rest no matter where you are. Thank goodness for this awesome Wearable Futon Air Mat Set by Japanese office supply manufacturer King Jim:

The coat-like wearable futon can be fastened at the neck and the bottoms of the legs folded up to adjust for different heights or to make it snugger in colder seasons. The pack includes an air mat so you have a full blanket and futon set that is comfortable and quick to prepare (there’s even an air pump included to help). The wearable futon can be rolled up into a sack like a sleeping bag while the air bed-like mat flattens, making this super easy to store in the A4 file-sized pack.

Now there’s no need to pack a cumbersome bag with blankets and a pillow or suffer trying to sleep on the cold, hard ground. Not when you could be wearing a stylish pair of futon coveralls and then, when it’s sleepy time, inflate your personal air mattress and drift off to a peaceful sleep, quietly hoping that none of the poor suckers who don’t have their own wearable futons decide spend their sleepless hours trying to figure out if you and your air mattress will float or perhaps make a good toboggan.

Click here to order.

[via Japan Trend Shop]

Awesome Anamorphic Artwork isn’t restricted to walls, floors and sketchbooks. There’s a whole amazing subset that, instead of having the viewer stand in just the right spot, requires looking at flat image or sculpture reflected in a cylindrical mirror in order to see it properly.

Last month the folks at Bored Panda assembled a fascinating collection of 23 examples of this mind-bending art form. Here you see pieces by István Orosz, Jonty Hurwitz, Vera Bugatti and Awtar Singh Virdi respectively.

Click here to view the entire post.

[via Bored Panda]

Redditor fungiside was in the right place at the right time to capture this awesome image of a giant digital billboard during a video calibration test. We’re pretty sure this is a lot more fun to look at than whatever advertisement was subsequently displayed.

"The video is a test to make sure all of the individual panels are working together to make one complete picture. And actually, if you look about a quarter of the way up from the bottom, you will notice a horizontal line going all the way across and breaking the pattern. This is what they are looking for when doing a test like this."

Click here to watch a brief video of the psychedelic calibration process.
[via Twisted Sifter]

Redditor fungiside was in the right place at the right time to capture this awesome image of a giant digital billboard during a video calibration test. We’re pretty sure this is a lot more fun to look at than whatever advertisement was subsequently displayed.

"The video is a test to make sure all of the individual panels are working together to make one complete picture. And actually, if you look about a quarter of the way up from the bottom, you will notice a horizontal line going all the way across and breaking the pattern. This is what they are looking for when doing a test like this."

Click here to watch a brief video of the psychedelic calibration process.

[via Twisted Sifter]

In 1888 actress Ellen Terry performed the role of Lady Macbeth at London’s Lyceum Theatre while wearing an awesome green gown bedecked with the 1,000 sloughed-off wings of the jewel beetle. It quickly became one of the most celebrated costumes of the Victorian era, immortalized in a portrait painted by John Singer Sargent.

126 years is a long time and over the years Dame Terry’s dress experienced all sorts of wear and tear and numerous alterations. But after 1,300 hours of painstaking work over and £50,000 ($81,000) in expenses, this magnificent costume has been restored to its original glory.

Work began on the gown two years ago after a successful fundraising campaign, but restoring the beetle wings wasn’t the most difficult task. “We had collected the beetle wings that had fallen off over the years,” says Paul Meredith, house manager at Smallhythe Place, where the dress now resides, “so that the conservator was able to reattach many of the originals, plus others that had been donated to us—1,000 in total.” The restoration team patched the 100 or so broken wings using small pieces of Japanese tissue and wheat starch paste.

Click here to read more about the restoration process.

Photos by Zenzie Tinker

[via Morbid Anatomy and Ecouterre]

Toronto, Ontario-based artist Ruth Oosterman collaborates with her two-year-old daughter Eve to create imaginative paintings that feel as though they’ve been lifted from the pages of a fantastic series of storybooks we’re now dying to read. Here Oosterman describe their process:

As all of our collaborations start, my two year old creates her own sketch with an ink pen which I then use to turn into a watercolor painting. The sketch is completely her own with no instruction given from me, I simply use her creativity to inspire me to create a painting.

Oosterman says that she can usually either discern a picture hidden inside Eve’s sketch or her daughter will have chatted with her about what she was drawing. But sometimes there is no conteext andshe has to let her own imagination run with it.

I try to work quickly and let imagination and play take root into the painting rather than taking it to seriously, this way I can encourage Eve’s contribution without making it to “grownup.”

Visit Ruth Oosterman’s blog and her YouTube channel to check out more of her wonderful collaborations with young Eve.

Prints of some of their creations are available via the Eve’s Imagination Etsy shop.

[via Bored Panda]