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921 posts tagged Design

This 1949 Cadillac has an awesomely shiny $382.95 paint job. That is, it’s been covered in exactly 38, 295 pennies. Affectionately called “Penny,” she was customized by and belongs to the Thompson family. The pennies were affixed to car one at a time using silicone glue over a 6 week period during the summer of 1999. Altogether they add over 200 lbs to the vehicle’s weight. All but four of the pennies were attached head side up. They’re all American pennies and include one 1817 Large Cent coin, 2 error pennies and 4 1943 steel pennies.

We love that the Thompsons display their Penny Caddy with a sign that reads “Please Touch the Car!” We’d certainly want to.

Click here for additional photos.

[via Twisted Sifter and Rodz Back Alley]

Today the Department of Awesome Parenting checks in on the work of Nina Levy (previously featured here), the Brooklyn-based artist and mother of two lucky sons who’ve been receiving beautifully illustrated napkins with their boxed lunches every day since 2006. Nina used waterproof markers and paint pens to transform plain white napkins into vibrant works of art and notes of affection and encouragement for her sons.

Nina recently won the TUACA Liqueur Company’s napkin art competition for her entry featuring two lions enjoying a drink at a bar.

Visit the Daily Napkins blog or Facebook page to check out more of Nina’s amazing illustrated napkins.

[via Lost At E Minor and Bored Panda]

Self-taught Alaskan sculptor Lee Cross, known professionally as Wood Splitter Lee, creates incredible one of a kind fantasy creatures that are so remarkably lifelike they verge on creepy, which is just one of the things that makes them so awesome. All of Lee’s creatures are completely made by hand without the use of and patterns, molds or casts. Their bodies contain articulated skeletons wrapped with stuffing, making them very soft to handle and fully posable. They’re decorated with carefully hand-applied synthetic fur and paint. As you can see from these photos, some of Lee’s creatures are more fantastic in nature than others, but they’re all amazing to behold.

Lee’s creatures are available for purchase through weekly Auction Adoptions held on eBay.

To check out more of her phenomenal handmade creatures, visit Wood Splitter Lee’s DeviantArt gallery.

[via DeMilked]

We can’t stop staring at this indescribably awesome AT-ST cat tree. It was made by Roxy’s Dream, a small Douglassville, PA-based company that creates high quality custom pet furniture. Their kitties really appear to be getting into the villainous spirit of chicken walker operation. Pew pew!

Visit the Roxy’s Dream Facebook page for more photos of this spectacularly geeky cat tree as well as many of their other custom pet furniture creations.

[via theGrue.com]

In an episode of The Simpsons entitled “Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?” (Season 2, Episode 15), at the request of his newly-discovered half-brother Herb, Homer designs a new car: “The Homer.” It’s the car of Homer’s dreams, a car for the “average” American, a car so ridiculous and expensive that it completely ruins Powell Motors his half-brother’s business.

That hilarious episode first aired back in 1991. Now, more than twenty years later, engineers at Porcubimmer Motors have created The Homer for real, complete with a bubble dome, a horn that plays “La Cucaracha,” and, we’re guessing, an engine that sounds like “the world’s coming to an end.”

Click here to watch a video about this awesome vehicular monstrosity.

Photos by David Moore (click here to view more photos of The Homer)

[via Neatorama and Technabob]

Born in Hong Kong and now based in Pittsburgh, PA, artist Bovey Lee painstakingly hand cuts astonishingly intricate designs and scenes on large sheets of thin Chinese rice paper. These mesmerizing works are as awesomely detailed as they are delicate. Look closely and you’ll discover cityscapes hidden among leaves and grass or cars driving along what you first took to be blades of grass. Practically weightless all by them selves, Lee mounts her fragile cut paper pieces on silk before they’re hung on gallery walls.

Visit Bovey Lee’s cut paper gallery to check out more of her amazing cut paper creations.

[via Colossal]

These tentacular Octopus and Giant Squid tables are the work of San Francisco-based bronze sculptor Kirk McGuire. The beautiful bronze cephalopods are so lifelike, we wouldn’t be surprised if you felt phantom tentacles tickling your ankles while sitting at either of these tables.

Visit Kirk McGuire’s website to check out his standalone bronze sculptures and more of his awesome undersea animal tables.

[via Neatorama]

There’s something awesome about a thing that’s so cute, it transcends cuteness to become nightmarishly creepy. That’s precisely the case with these impressively freaky pears, photographed last year at a supermarket in Beijing, China.

The pears are shaped like this by placing them inside special molds when they’re still very small. As they grow they fill the mold and take on its shape. They were marketed at the grocery store as “happy/joyful doll pears,” but we think they look like they’re patiently waiting for you to try taking a bite out of them, at which point they’ll start screaming bloody murder, or worse, turn you into a creepy pear-doll-person too.

[via Neatorama and RocketNews24]

Phil Weicker and Duncan Forster, Los Angeles-based friends and fellow car enthusiasts, spent nearly six years converting a classic 1969 Cadillac Coupe de Ville into an awesome mobile hot tub, the Carpool DeVille. Both former engineering students, the pair devised a watertight steering system and a way to use the car’s original V8 engine to maintain the hot tub’s ideal water temperature of 102F. The Carpool DeVille holds about 5000 lbs of water and has been fitted with a marine throttle to keep the engine running. What was the trunk now holds a pool filtering system.

Weicker and Forster recently used a Kickstarter campaign to raise the funds needed to get themselves and the Carpool DeVille to the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah this August in hopes of setting the Land Speed Record for the “World’s Fastest Hot Tub.”

"Nobody’s ever gone a hundred miles an hour in an open-air self-propelled hot tub while sitting neck-deep in soothing warm water. We aim to correct that mistake of history this August."

Head over to the Daily Mail for additional images as well as video footage of the Carpool DeVille in action.

[via the Daily Mail and Telegraph.co.uk]

Today’s visit to the Archie McPhee Library explores a book that’s much more than a book, it’s A Humument: A Treated Victorian Novel [Buy on Amazon] by British artist Tom Phillips. This amazing altered book began its literary life as a novel entitled A Human Document, written in 1892 by English writer W. H. Mallock. Fast-forward to 1966 when Tom Phillips bought the book for threepence at a junk shop in South London. He spent the next seven years painstakingly drawing, painting and collaging over each of the book’s 367 pages. Phillips left gaps in his artwork revealing some of the novel’s original text on each page. These exposed words tell the story of a new protagonist named Bill Toge, whose name only appears when the word “together” or “altogether” appears in W. H. Mallock’s original text.

When asked about the book, Phillips replied:

"It is a forgotten Victorian novel found by chance …I plundered, mined, and undermined its text to make it yield the ghosts of other possible stories, scenes, poems, erotic incidents, and surrealist catastrophes which seemed to lurk within its wall of words. As I worked on it, I replaced the text I’d stripped away with visual images of all kinds. It began to tell and depict, among other memories, dreams, and reflections, the sad story of Bill Toge, one of love’s casualties."

That’s how A Human Document became A Humument, but this extraordinary work of art is very much a work in progress. Philips has never stopped working on his splendidly altered book. Four revised editions have been published over the years, with the most recent Fifth Edition published in 2012. Each subsequent revision contains at least 50 new pages replacing their earlier versions. Phillip’s long-term goal is to eventually rework and replace every single page from the original 1970 edition.

In 2010 Tom Philips released a digital version of A Humument in the form of A Humument App for the iPad and iPhone.

Click here to learn more about this phenomenal artist’s book or click here to simply order a copy right now.

[Images via Humument.com]