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174 posts tagged Drawing

French art director and illustrator Troqman makes clever use of both his pens and his sketchbooks as well as his surroundings in order to create entertaining drawings of characters appearing to interact with the real world. Our favorite pieces involve characters on multiple pages or sketchbooks interacting with each other as well as the 3D world. And then there’s Spider-Man who think’s he just found his long-lost father.

Troqman calls this playful hobby Cartoon Bombing and you can see a lot more of it over o Instagram or right here on Tumblr at troqman.

[via Bored Panda]

Toronto, Ontario-based artist Ruth Oosterman collaborates with her two-year-old daughter Eve to create imaginative paintings that feel as though they’ve been lifted from the pages of a fantastic series of storybooks we’re now dying to read. Here Oosterman describe their process:

As all of our collaborations start, my two year old creates her own sketch with an ink pen which I then use to turn into a watercolor painting. The sketch is completely her own with no instruction given from me, I simply use her creativity to inspire me to create a painting.

Oosterman says that she can usually either discern a picture hidden inside Eve’s sketch or her daughter will have chatted with her about what she was drawing. But sometimes there is no conteext andshe has to let her own imagination run with it.

I try to work quickly and let imagination and play take root into the painting rather than taking it to seriously, this way I can encourage Eve’s contribution without making it to “grownup.”

Visit Ruth Oosterman’s blog and her YouTube channel to check out more of her wonderful collaborations with young Eve.

Prints of some of their creations are available via the Eve’s Imagination Etsy shop.

[via Bored Panda]

For an ongoing series entitled The Great Travelling Art Exhibition, English artist Ben Long uses his bare hands to create elaborate drawings in the grime that accumulates on the rear shutters of haulage trucks. As the trucks transport their goods across town and country, Long’s artwork is shared with the public. That is, until time or the inevitable powerwasher obscures the image.

"The ongoing project aims to bring art to the public through these moving canvases, away from restricted space of museums and art institution—his artworks focus on subjects relatable to many, such as animal portraits, human and their pets."

Visit Ben Long’s website to check out more of his artwork.

[via Whudat and Design Taxi]

Check out this awesome Giant Spirograph! It was created by Nathan, who runs the DIY craft website HaHa Bird. Nathan’s oversized wooden version of the classic drawing toy measures eight feet across and uses sidewalk chalk to create those wonderfully familiar geometric patters on the pavement.

"The idea for this project came about at a craft show in December when a friend of mine had a little trouble with a laser-cut Spirograph we found. I teased her about her apparent lack of fine motor skills, then had the idea to make a Spirograph that only required gross motor skills. How big could I make a Spirograph?"

The project took Nathan about 6 months and cost roughly $150 to complete.

Visit HaHa Bird for a detailed description about how the Giant Spirograph was created and view complete process photos.

[via Laughing Squid and Neatorama]

Today the Department of Awesome Parenting checks in on the work of Nina Levy (previously featured here), the Brooklyn-based artist and mother of two lucky sons who’ve been receiving beautifully illustrated napkins with their boxed lunches every day since 2006. Nina used waterproof markers and paint pens to transform plain white napkins into vibrant works of art and notes of affection and encouragement for her sons.

Nina recently won the TUACA Liqueur Company’s napkin art competition for her entry featuring two lions enjoying a drink at a bar.

Visit the Daily Napkins blog or Facebook page to check out more of Nina’s amazing illustrated napkins.

[via Lost At E Minor and Bored Panda]

Today’s visit to the Archie McPhee Library explores a book that’s much more than a book, it’s A Humument: A Treated Victorian Novel [Buy on Amazon] by British artist Tom Phillips. This amazing altered book began its literary life as a novel entitled A Human Document, written in 1892 by English writer W. H. Mallock. Fast-forward to 1966 when Tom Phillips bought the book for threepence at a junk shop in South London. He spent the next seven years painstakingly drawing, painting and collaging over each of the book’s 367 pages. Phillips left gaps in his artwork revealing some of the novel’s original text on each page. These exposed words tell the story of a new protagonist named Bill Toge, whose name only appears when the word “together” or “altogether” appears in W. H. Mallock’s original text.

When asked about the book, Phillips replied:

"It is a forgotten Victorian novel found by chance …I plundered, mined, and undermined its text to make it yield the ghosts of other possible stories, scenes, poems, erotic incidents, and surrealist catastrophes which seemed to lurk within its wall of words. As I worked on it, I replaced the text I’d stripped away with visual images of all kinds. It began to tell and depict, among other memories, dreams, and reflections, the sad story of Bill Toge, one of love’s casualties."

That’s how A Human Document became A Humument, but this extraordinary work of art is very much a work in progress. Philips has never stopped working on his splendidly altered book. Four revised editions have been published over the years, with the most recent Fifth Edition published in 2012. Each subsequent revision contains at least 50 new pages replacing their earlier versions. Phillip’s long-term goal is to eventually rework and replace every single page from the original 1970 edition.

In 2010 Tom Philips released a digital version of A Humument in the form of A Humument App for the iPad and iPhone.

Click here to learn more about this phenomenal artist’s book or click here to simply order a copy right now.

[Images via Humument.com]

We’ve just learned about another talented artist who uses the humble disposable coffee cup as their canvas. Jimmy T. enhances his morning coffee cups with striking pop culture-inspired drawings and then leaves them behind for other people to discover. Brightening the days of random strangers with unexpected and thoroughly marvelous artwork is awesome.

You can follow Jimmy’s ongoing series of geektastically illustrated coffee cups right here on Tumblr at morningcoffeecupart or on the Morning Coffee Cup Art on Facebook page

[via Geeks are Sexy]

Malaysian artist Monica Lee says she’s addicted to details. Her photorealistic pencil drawings are so intensely detailed that they could easily trick us into believing they were photos were it not for the art supplies photographed nearby. Some of these complex pieces take Lee 3 to 4 weeks to complete, yet she makes it look effortless. After working as a digital artist for 12 years, she’s decided to pursue her dream job working as an illustrator and by the looks of things, she’s off to an awesome start.

You can check out more of Monica Lee’s astonishing graphite illustrations on her Facebook page and Instagram account.

[via Design Taxi and Scene360]

When October Jones (previously featured here) isn’t sharing text messages sent by his dog or transforming his fellow train commuters by drawing new heads for them on post-it notes, he’s creating awesomely empowering messages and leaving them for his fellow travelers to find inside seatback trays on the train.

Follow October Jones on Twitter for more of his entertaining and inspirational sticky note escapades.

[via Neatorama]