Art + Science = Awesome

Claudia Diaz is a professor at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia who has undertaken an unorthodox method of teaching her human anatomy classes. After teaching the course for over 20 years, she found the traditional routine of rote anatomical memorization boring for both her students and herself. 3 years ago Claudia began incorporating body painting into the course as a way to inspire and motivate her students. Fellow students are painted by their peers as though their skin has been removed to reveal the structures of their muscles, tendons, and bones.

Featured in these photographs is chiropractic student Zac O’Brien who patiently sat for around 18 hours while fellow students painted him. The finished result is what Diaz likes to call “anatomical man,” first brought to one of her classes in 2010.

”We walked him in and I still remember the looks on the kids’ faces. They were just in awe,” she said. ”I realised it shocked them, it inspired them and it motivated them.” Previously shy about taking off their clothes so classmates could study their bodies, the students began to shed their inhibitions through this painting exercise. ”I couldn’t get the kids to keep their clothes on. They were all throwing them off,” Dr Diaz said.

Visit Beautiful Decay to view more photos from Claudia Diaz’s unusual human anatomy class.

This tentacular video is further proof that science is awesome and so are the kids who appreciate it. 

This is what happens when you mix Mercury(II) thiocyanate (Hg(SCN)2) and Ammonium chromate (NH4)2CrO4 and then set it on fire. I was honestly expecting the fiery volcano part, but at about 30 seconds in something… horrifying happens. The kids witnessing the experiment really make the video. “The kraken!!!!” 

Science + Kraken-aware kids = Super Awesome

[via Colossal]

Designer Peter Han creates awesome chalkboard drawings during a drawing class he teaches called Dynamic Sketching:

"Using only chalk, Han works with his students to let go of their preconceived notions about art and design by working in a fast, impermanent medium that always ends up being erased. The hope is to eventually free them from the idea of permanence and allow their ideas to grow through making mistakes."

Adriel de la Torre directed a short video, entitled Pardon My Dust, in which we get to watch Peter Han drawing and working with his students while telling about the philosophy behind his class. It’s beautiful and fascinating.

The video was produced by SnowGlobe StudiosClick here to watch.

[via Colossal]

The Pangolin is an awesome and completely unique mammal with large keratin scales covering its skin like a built-in suit of armour. Eight different species exist in different parts of Africa and Asia. When threatened, Pangolins curl up into a ball and tuck their faces under their tails. In fact, “the name, pangolin, comes from the Malay word, pengguling, meaning ‘something that rolls up’.”

Pangolins are shy, nocturnal creatures, and we still have a lot to learn about them. But while some people are trying to study Pangolins, poachers are hunting them to the very edge of extinction. That’s why dedicated specialists are gathering information about them in hopes of boosting global conservation efforts:

One such organisation is Pangolin Research Mundulea, whose UK co-investigator Paul Rankin, based in Surrey, works alongside Bruno Nebe at the Mundulea Nature Reserve in Namibia, tracking rescued pangolins in order to better understand them. [In the top photo you can see a pangolin with a tracking device on its tail.]

ONCA [One Network for Conservation and the Arts] has teamed Paul and colleague Debbie Shaw, an expert on Chinese traditional medicine, with a squadron of brilliant illustrators from Art Schism led by Sinna One, aka Daryl Bennett, to create the wild, colourful Pangolin Trail of paintings on telephone exchange boxes around Brighton, England.

The photos you see here are each part of an awesome interactive street art scavenger hunt devoted to educating the public about Pangolins and their plight. “Each painting features a detail from the world of pangolins, and if you scan the QR code on the painting it will take you to a webpage with more detailed information about the pictured aspect of this incredible class of beasts: their lives, their homes, their neighbours [hello Mister Honey Badger!] and the threats they face.”

Click here to view a map of the Trail.

Visit The Pangolin Trail website to learn more about this project.

[via ONCA and wombatarama]

Take a look—it’s in a book!

1983 was the year that an awesome American children’s television series called Reading Rainbow first aired on PBS. Passionately devoted to encouraging kids to read (and visit their local libraries), the show was hosted by LeVar Burton and ran until 2006. It is the third-longest running children’s series in PBS history, after Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood and Sesame Street.

In 2012 LeVar Burton and his company RRKIDZ released the Reading Rainbow App for the iPad. Within 36 hours it became the most-downloaded educational app in the iTunes App Store.

Mental Floss recently posted a fascinating selection of tattoos on teachers. This one, depicting an enraged Charles Darwin wielding an even angrier King Kong while being menaced by planes, is our favourite. It’s on the leg of a Massachusetts science teacher named Chris:

Chris writes, “I teach science at a public school in eastern Mass. This tattoo was taken from a New Yorker cartoon that my wife and I both have hanging in our classroom’s (she teaches science, too). Most people think it’s her Dad…there is a resemblance. When told it’s Charles Darwin, too many people reply, “Who’s Charles Darwin?”. It’s kind of sad. I call this Darwin Kong, the establishment trying to destroy Darwin for the same reason it destroyed Kong, it just didn’t understand him.”

Darwin Kong = Awesome
Less talk, more science AND ape-related tattoos!
Head over to Mental Floss to view more tattooed teachers.

Mental Floss recently posted a fascinating selection of tattoos on teachers. This one, depicting an enraged Charles Darwin wielding an even angrier King Kong while being menaced by planes, is our favourite. It’s on the leg of a Massachusetts science teacher named Chris:

Chris writes, “I teach science at a public school in eastern Mass. This tattoo was taken from a New Yorker cartoon that my wife and I both have hanging in our classroom’s (she teaches science, too). Most people think it’s her Dad…there is a resemblance. When told it’s Charles Darwin, too many people reply, “Who’s Charles Darwin?”. It’s kind of sad. I call this Darwin Kong, the establishment trying to destroy Darwin for the same reason it destroyed Kong, it just didn’t understand him.”

Darwin Kong = Awesome

Less talk, more science AND ape-related tattoos!

Head over to Mental Floss to view more tattooed teachers.

Science is awesome and this captivating video taught us about some seriously awesome science with some of the most mesmerizing high-speed video footage we’ve ever seen:

"Destin from Smarter Every Day stopped by Orbix Hot Glass in Fort Payne, Alabama to explore a fascinating phenomenon called a Prince Rupert’s Drop. Apparently when molten hot glass is dropped in cold water it forms an object that’s almost completely impervious to brute force, even a sold hammer strike to the center of the teardrop-like shape won’t break the glass. Yet gently cut or even bump the tip of the drop and suddenly the entire thing shatters in an explosive chain reaction traveling at a speed of over 1 mile PER SECOND. Watch the video above to see the effect in 130,000 fps glory.”

[via Colossal]

Artist Larry Moss (previously featured here) and the rest of the Airigami team recently completed this awesome 20-foot-long balloon sculpture of an Acrocanthosaurus, a predatory dinosaur from the early Cretaceous period. It took the team four days to create the giant inflated beast. He was installed in the Virgina Museum of Natural History beside the cast of an actual Acrocanthosaurus skeleton, where he’ll remain for as long as his component balloons can hold their air.

[via designboom]

Have you ever wondered exactly how big the moon is? We love it when otherwise inconceivably large things are put into a comprehensible perspective. Redditor boredboarder8 wanted to better understand the size of the moon. Armed with the knowledge that “the greatest distance between two points within the contiguous U.S. is 2,892 miles (stretching from Point Arena, CA to West Quoddy Head, ME*)" and that the circumference of the Moon is 6,784 miles, boredboarder8 cleverly placed one measurement atop the other to create this rough approximation.

"It was difficult for me to fathom the size of the moon, thus inspiring the creation of this map. For me, this map puts the scale of the moon much smaller than I previously imagined. But it’s really interesting hearing how others (already grasping the size of the moon) now see the US as larger. 
It was one definitely a weird challenge to take a “flat” map of something on a sphere and project it onto a smaller sphere… Certainly take it only as an approximation, but what intrigued me the most is that the distance spanning the continental United States is roughly equal to a little less than half the circumference of the moon.”

So what do you think, does this awesome image make the moon seem larger or smaller than you thought? 
[via io9]

Have you ever wondered exactly how big the moon is? We love it when otherwise inconceivably large things are put into a comprehensible perspective. Redditor boredboarder8 wanted to better understand the size of the moon. Armed with the knowledge that “the greatest distance between two points within the contiguous U.S. is 2,892 miles (stretching from Point Arena, CA to West Quoddy Head, ME*)" and that the circumference of the Moon is 6,784 miles, boredboarder8 cleverly placed one measurement atop the other to create this rough approximation.

"It was difficult for me to fathom the size of the moon, thus inspiring the creation of this map. For me, this map puts the scale of the moon much smaller than I previously imagined. But it’s really interesting hearing how others (already grasping the size of the moon) now see the US as larger. 

It was one definitely a weird challenge to take a “flat” map of something on a sphere and project it onto a smaller sphere… Certainly take it only as an approximation, but what intrigued me the most is that the distance spanning the continental United States is roughly equal to a little less than half the circumference of the moon.”

So what do you think, does this awesome image make the moon seem larger or smaller than you thought? 

[via io9]