Dutch designers Marcia Nolte, Stijn van der Vleuten and Bob Waardenburg work together as We Make Carpets to create, well, carpets. However their carpets are awesomely unusual and definitely not made to be walked on.

The patterns they use are very traditional, but the materials are anything but. The trio uses everyday items such as cocktail umbrellas, bamboo skewers, disposable kitchenware, crayons, fireworks and dried pasta to create intricately patterned carpets that exist as temporary art installations presenting a critical view of consumer culture.

To celebrate 5 years of creative carpet-making We Make Carpets is holding an exhibition of their work in the form of recent carpet designs at the mu gallery in Eindhoven, Netherlands. The exhibition runs through October 26, 2014.

Visit the We Make Carpets website to check out more of their creations.

[via Colossal]


You remind me of the babe.The babe with the power.The power of voodoo.

Somewhere in the wilds of Chicago there’s a babysitter looking for work, an awesome babysitter, and his name is Jareth, the Goblin King. You’ll notice that all of the contact info tabs at the bottom of this ad have been torn off. Jareth’s magical services are in high demand in the Windy City.
Photo by Ginger Fish
[via Nerd Approved]

You remind me of the babe.
The babe with the power.
The power of voodoo.

Somewhere in the wilds of Chicago there’s a babysitter looking for work, an awesome babysitter, and his name is Jareth, the Goblin King. You’ll notice that all of the contact info tabs at the bottom of this ad have been torn off. Jareth’s magical services are in high demand in the Windy City.

Photo by Ginger Fish

[via Nerd Approved]

Spanish street artist Pejac (previously featured here) isn’t content with using details as inspiration for enhancing the urban landscape. He’s also used the windows inside his own home to create playful works of art, including a recent tribute to the 40th anniversary of French high-wire artist Philippe Petit’s legendary walk between the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City.

"Back in 2011, when he was living in Valencia, surrounded by surveillance cameras and without curtains to protect his privacy, Pejac started experimenting with paper and acrylic works on glass. He shared a couple of these earlier works with us, photographed by Paco Esteve. Feeling exposed and trapped inside his home, he started creating these as a way of fighting this lack of privacy. By using the view from his house as a backdrop for these miniature works, he created little urban art pieces in privacy of his living room."

Head over to Hi-Fructose for additional process photos.

[via Hi-Fructose]

Depending on where you live graffiti pieces may be a regular sight, but even if that’s so, those pieces are usually created in secret - painted in abandoned or out-of-the-way locations or at least under the cover of darkness. Unless you’re hanging around legal walls, it’s unusual to get to watch a writer execute one of their pieces. This time-lapse video, produced by paint company Ironlak, shows Melbourne-based street artist Sofles doing what he does best inside an abandoned building. It’s pretty awesome to watch the creation of a burner. He makes it look so easy while revealing just how many steps there are in creating a piece of this caliber.

[via Design Taxi]

Street artist Reed Bmore uses needle-nose pliers and lengths of galvanized wire to create lyrical and playful pieces art that he hangs around the city of Baltimore, Maryland. He designed a clip system for his wire sculptures that enables them to hang securely while still being able to move with the breeze. And if you’re wondering how he gets them up there in the first place, while Reed was actually climbing street light and traffic poles at first, these days he uses a telescoping painter’s pole instead.

Considering that his work is put up in Baltimore and made of wire, we were delighted to learn that the artist is currently working on a series of pieces based on the TV series The Wire.

[via Reddit, City Paper and the Baltimore Sun]

Feast your eyes on this mouthwatering entirely condiment-based portrait of the inimitably awesome Sir Patrick Stewart as Captain Jean-Luc Picard. It was painted by artist Jennifer Marshall using ketchup, mustard, hoisin sauce and bleu cheese sauce. “Commander Data, please bring the veggie tray. Number One, you’re in charge of supplying the tater tots. Commander Worf has the onion rings. Snacks raised everyone? Engage.”
[via Geek Crafts]

Feast your eyes on this mouthwatering entirely condiment-based portrait of the inimitably awesome Sir Patrick Stewart as Captain Jean-Luc Picard. It was painted by artist Jennifer Marshall using ketchup, mustard, hoisin sauce and bleu cheese sauce. “Commander Data, please bring the veggie tray. Number One, you’re in charge of supplying the tater tots. Commander Worf has the onion rings. Snacks raised everyone? Engage.”

[via Geek Crafts]

Spanish street artist Pejac (previously featured here), skilled at making use of the urban landscape, recently paid a visit to Paris where he cleverly transformed a long crack in a wall into a wavy, dreamlike door, ever so slightly ajar. We can’t guarantee that it’s a gateway to Narnia, but - if you can get it open - we suspect this door leads somewhere awesome.

Visit Pejac’s website to check out more of his fantastic street art interventions.

[via StreetArtNews]

Portuguese street artist Bordalo II (previously featured here) is back in his hometown of Lisbon where he used scrap metal, found objects, urban detritus and vibrant paint to create this awesome “Space Grasshopper" installation.

Visit Bordalo II’s website and Instagram account to check out more of his marvelous mixed media creations.

[via StreetArtNews]

For an ongoing series entitled The Great Travelling Art Exhibition, English artist Ben Long uses his bare hands to create elaborate drawings in the grime that accumulates on the rear shutters of haulage trucks. As the trucks transport their goods across town and country, Long’s artwork is shared with the public. That is, until time or the inevitable powerwasher obscures the image.

"The ongoing project aims to bring art to the public through these moving canvases, away from restricted space of museums and art institution—his artworks focus on subjects relatable to many, such as animal portraits, human and their pets."

Visit Ben Long’s website to check out more of his artwork.

[via Whudat and Design Taxi]