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83 posts tagged Fish

Kevin Champeny
School of Transcendence
42 Kevin Champeny
School of Transcendence
42 Kevin Champeny
School of Transcendence
42 Kevin Champeny
School of Transcendence
42 Kevin Champeny
School of Transcendence
42 Kevin Champeny
School of Transcendence
42 Kevin Champeny
School of Transcendence
42

Artist Kevin Champeny (previously featured here) just completed an awesome new, spectacularly detailed mosaic entitled School of Transcendence. This beautiful koi and the water through which it’s swimming are made of 25,000 hand cast resin fish. That’s a lot of tiny fish.

The finished piece measures 42” x 60” x 1.5”. The longer we look at it, the more we keep expecting this dazzling school of fish to suddenly burst apart as each tiny fish swims away.

[via kchampeny]

Reblogged from kchampeny

Because what isn’t awesome about this happy-go-derpy Parrotfish photobomb? That’s just what we thought too, it’s completely awesome. This infectiously happy fish swam into the frame in front of some Snuba divers near the Eastern Dry Rocks coral reef southwest of Key West, Florida.
Photo by Snuba Key West
[via Telegraph.co.uk]

Because what isn’t awesome about this happy-go-derpy Parrotfish photobomb? That’s just what we thought too, it’s completely awesome. This infectiously happy fish swam into the frame in front of some Snuba divers near the Eastern Dry Rocks coral reef southwest of Key West, Florida.

Photo by Snuba Key West

[via Telegraph.co.uk]

Behold the gustatory glory is that is the Fish & Chip ice cream cone. It was created by frozen treat visionary Shane Teare, owner of Teare Woods ice cream parlor located in Whitby, North Yorkshire, England.

The cone holds a big scoop of minty mushy pea-flavored ice cream and a scoop of fish-flavored ice cream rolled in scraps, topped with a big chip (french fry) in place of the traditional English Flake.

It’s treat you may never want to try, but we’re always up for unusual flavors so just discovering that this exists is pretty awesome.

[via Design Taxi and Metro.co.uk]

These adorably strange little creatures that looks like a pieces of coral that just woke up are Pygmy seahorses, a species of seahorse that was completely unknown to science until the 1970s. Found in Southeast Asia in the Coral Triangle area, they’re incredibly small - measuring only two centimeters long - which ranks them among the smallest seahorses on earth. So between their itty-bittiess and their amazing ability to blend in amongst the the sea grasses, soft corals and gorgonians that they inhabit, it’s a wonder they were discovered at all.

Photos by Daniel Kwok, Jayvee Fernandez, Pacific Klaus, EOL, Graham Short, and Steven Childs respectively.

Click here to learn more about these awesome little fish and visit Ark in Space for additional images.

[via Kuriositas and Ark in Space]

Deep Sea Fauna… with Googly Eyes is an awesome site right here on Tumblr that posts photos of amazing deep sea creatures that have been hilariously enhanced with googly eyes. Learn about the myriad mysterious creature of the deep while laughing at their goofy peepers. (Don’t worry, they live way, way far down in the ocean depths. They’ll never know.)

These images are just a small sampling. Head over to deepseafauna for many more.

And what about you? Do you have an urge to googly eye-ify something? Click here to stock up.

It’s Wonderfully Weird Water Friday on Geyser of Awesome!

Have you ever seen a white blue marlin? Now you have, thanks to Bob and Karen Weaver. The couple were fishing off the coast of Los Sueños, Costa Rica aboard the Spanish Fly when they caught and released what both the International Game Fish Association and The Billfish Foundation have identified as a leucistic blue marlin.

Unlike albinism, leucism is caused by a reduction in all types of skin pigment, not just melanin.

"A further difference between albinism and leucism is in eye colour. Due to the lack of melanin production in both the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and iris, albinos typically have red eyes due to the underlying blood vessels showing through. In contrast, most leucistic animals have normally coloured eyes."

Both organizations also agree that this is the first time such an awesomely rare creature has been caught on camera. The photos were taken by the crew of the Spanish Fly, a fishing boat chartered through Maverick Yachts and Sportfishing Charters.

[via Twisted Sifter]

It’s been a while since we last checked in on the playful artwork of Roadsworth (previously featured here). The Montreal-based street artist continues to create clever large-scale pieces that turn city streets into an urban wonderland. Flocks of geese migrate in v-formation down the middle of a street while a school of sardines swims into a net and then turns up packed into a can at two crosswalks. The dividing lines of a parking lot are the stems from which saplings sprout as giant flowers grow up out of the gutter.

"This year marks a decade since Roadsworth was charged with 53 counts of public mischief, after which he received considerable public support and was let go with a slap on the wrist. Since then the artist has created artwork for municipalities, exhibitions, and arts festivals around the world."

Visit Roadworth’s website to check out more of his awesome street art.

[via Colossal and Design Taxi]

Yuko Higuchi’s artwork combines so many of our favourite things, such as tentacles, cats and anthropomorphism, that looking at her drawings feels like we’ve fallen down a rabbit hole created just for us. We were delighted to learn that the adorable kitty featured in so many Yuko’s pieces is based on her own pet cat named Boris. He’s her primary source of inspiration.

These pieces are just a small sampling of Yuko Higuchi's surreal world. You can see lots more of her artwork on Facebook, via Twitter, or right here on Tumblr. She also recently published her very first illustrated book.

[via Spoon & Tamago]

Eels may not be the first creatures that spring to mind when considering cute animals, but now that we’ve seen a wee baby Black Ribbon Moray eel (top photo) we’ve got to admit that it’s one of the cutest little monsters we’ve ever seen. The toothy baby’s proud parents are pictured in the second photo. Mama eel is the yellow one and papa eel is black.

But wait, that top photo isn’t just an unexpected source of cuteness. It’s also proof of an awesome breakthrough: the first successful captive breeding of any of the more than 200 known species of Moray eel.

At Zoo Vienna Schönbrunn in Austria, a Black Ribbon Moray laid a clutch of fertilized eggs. This fact alone is quite a sensation. But it gets better: some larvae even hatched!

"It is the first time that the hatching of Morays could be observed. Up to now, nobody knew what the larvae look like, what they eat and how they behave“, explains the zoo’s director Dagmar Schratter.

Photos by Daniel Zupanc

Visit ZooBorns to learn more about how the Schönbrunn Zoo is successfully breeding adorable monster-baby eels.