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10 posts tagged Gold

We aren’t sure if this Giant Isopod iPhone case would deter phone theft or actually encourage it, but either way it’s creepily awesome. You could chat on your isopod phone while snacking on a batch of adorably creepy isopod sausages or actual giant isopods.

Created exclusively for sale in Japan, these limited edition communication crustaceans come in both silver and gold versions, which sell for $80 and $120 respectively. Only 500 were produced, so we’d better buy plane tickets soon if we hope to snag one for ourselves.

It probably won’t fit in your pocket. But if your phone looked this fantastically freaky, would you ever want to put it away? Neither would we.

[via Geekologie]

Internationally renown English artist Damien Hirst just unveiled his latest work that’s part of his ongoing Natural History series that began in the early 90s with a shark suspended in formaldehyde, and it’s a pretty awesome spectacle. Entitled Gone but not Forgotten, it’s a gilded woolly mammoth skeleton, standing three meters tall, encased in a massive case made of glass and steel.

‘The mammoth comes from a time and place that we cannot ever fully understand. despite its scientific reality, it has attained an almost mythical status and I wanted to play with these ideas of legend, history and science by gilding the skeleton and placing it within a monolithic gold tank.’ hirst explains of the piece ‘it’s such an absolute expression of mortality, but i’ve decorated it to the point where it’s become something else, i’ve pitched everything I can against death to create something more hopeful, it is gone but not forgotten.’

Hirst donated his splendid golden mammoth to the amfAR organization, who are using it to raise funds by putting it up for auction at their annual Cinema Against AIDS gala in Cannes.

Click here for a time-lapse video of the creation of Gone but not Forgotten.

[via designboom]

Nothing says “Our love will last forever.” like a tiny gold squid encircling your ring finger. This tentacular little beauty was handmade by Portland, OR-based jeweler Cheyenne Weil of gin & butterflies. She custom-makes each Squid Wedding Band by hand-carving the ring in wax and then casting it using the lost-wax method.

"This ring is a highly detailed piece with the squid and water/wave design flowing all the way around the ring, leaving no particular part "up." It is a nice 8mm in width, over 2mm thick, and has a delicious weighty feel."

Click here for more information and then check out the rest of Cheyenne’s gin & butterflies shop.

[via Fashionably Geek]

Do you remember the amazing skeleton we posted about awhile back belonging to an awesome woman fitted with a prosthetic eye that had originally been gilt and engraved to look like a sun? We sure do.
Artist Nick Beecher recently took up the challenge to illustrate what she may have looked like in life and we think his interpretation is pretty awesome.

archiemcphee:
Here’s an awesome little piece of history:
Archaeologists in the Burnt City have discovered what appears to be an ancient prosthetic eye. What makes this discovery exceptionally awesome is the striking description of how the owner and her false eye would have appeared while she was still alive and blinking:

[The eye] has a hemispherical form and a diameter of just over 2.5 cm (1 inch). It consists of very light material, probably bitumen paste. The surface of the artificial eye is covered with a thin layer of gold, engraved with a central circle (representing the iris) and gold lines patterned like sun rays. The female remains found with the artificial eye was 1.82 m tall (6 feet), much taller than ordinary women of her time. On both sides of the eye are drilled tiny holes, through which a golden thread could hold the eyeball in place. Since microscopic research has shown that the eye socket showed clear imprints of the golden thread, the eyeball must have been worn during her lifetime. The woman’s skeleton has been dated to between 2900 and 2800 BCE.

So she was an extraordinarily tall woman walking around wearing an engraved golden eye patterned with rays like a tiny sun. What an awesome sight that must have been.
[via TYWKIWDBI]

knottybear: Wow.
fangirequeen: SOMEONE DRAW HER PLEASE
beecharts:
CHALLENGE ACCEPTED!!

Do you remember the amazing skeleton we posted about awhile back belonging to an awesome woman fitted with a prosthetic eye that had originally been gilt and engraved to look like a sun? We sure do.

Artist Nick Beecher recently took up the challenge to illustrate what she may have looked like in life and we think his interpretation is pretty awesome.

archiemcphee:

Here’s an awesome little piece of history:

Archaeologists in the Burnt City have discovered what appears to be an ancient prosthetic eye. What makes this discovery exceptionally awesome is the striking description of how the owner and her false eye would have appeared while she was still alive and blinking:

[The eye] has a hemispherical form and a diameter of just over 2.5 cm (1 inch). It consists of very light material, probably bitumen paste. The surface of the artificial eye is covered with a thin layer of gold, engraved with a central circle (representing the iris) and gold lines patterned like sun rays. The female remains found with the artificial eye was 1.82 m tall (6 feet), much taller than ordinary women of her time. On both sides of the eye are drilled tiny holes, through which a golden thread could hold the eyeball in place. Since microscopic research has shown that the eye socket showed clear imprints of the golden thread, the eyeball must have been worn during her lifetime. The woman’s skeleton has been dated to between 2900 and 2800 BCE.

So she was an extraordinarily tall woman walking around wearing an engraved golden eye patterned with rays like a tiny sun. What an awesome sight that must have been.

[via TYWKIWDBI]

knottybearWow.

fangirequeen: SOMEONE DRAW HER PLEASE

beecharts:

CHALLENGE ACCEPTED!!

Source archiemcphee

Reblogged from archiemcphee

Kelly McCallum is a Canadian born, London-based artist who specializes in taxidermy, metalsmith, and jewelry making. She fitted these two pieces of antique taxidermy, a hare and a badger, with gold-plated handlebar mustaches as part of an ongoing series of projects created with fellow artist Märta Mattsson under the name Diamonds & Dead Things.

"D&D is not a straightforward collaboration of ideas or a way to share the making of pieces, but an opportunity to throw caution to the wind and to create work in which each artist does not always have complete control. It’s about constructing opportunities for creative play, to search for the magical in the unexpected and to allow two creative minds free reign to explore all that is possible."

Visit Kelly McCallum’s website and Diamonds & Dead Things to check out more of her artwork.

[via Diamonds & Dead Things and Dazed Digital]

Caddisfly larvae construct silk cases decorated with pieces of gravel, sand, twigs, snail shells, and other natural debris. This most often happens during winter months, so the theory behind this behaviour is that they do it to protect themselves from the cold, harsh weather.
However if you’re a Caddisfly larvae in the care of French artist Hubert Duprat, you’ll have an entirely different supply of materials with this to create your protective case:

Duprat “introduced beads, pearls, turquoise, and 18-karat gold pieces into their environment and let them construct tiny gilded sculptures. Duprat has been collaborating with the larvae since the 1980s. Learn more about his work at Cabinet Magazine.”

Photos by Jean-Luc Fournier via Cabinet
[via Laughing Squid]

Caddisfly larvae construct silk cases decorated with pieces of gravel, sand, twigs, snail shells, and other natural debris. This most often happens during winter months, so the theory behind this behaviour is that they do it to protect themselves from the cold, harsh weather.

However if you’re a Caddisfly larvae in the care of French artist Hubert Duprat, you’ll have an entirely different supply of materials with this to create your protective case:

Duprat “introduced beads, pearls, turquoise, and 18-karat gold pieces into their environment and let them construct tiny gilded sculptures. Duprat has been collaborating with the larvae since the 1980s. Learn more about his work at Cabinet Magazine.”

Photos by Jean-Luc Fournier via Cabinet

[via Laughing Squid]

Here’s an awesome little piece of history:
Archaeologists in the Burnt City have discovered what appears to be an ancient prosthetic eye. What makes this discovery exceptionally awesome is the striking description of how the owner and her false eye would have appeared while she was still alive and blinking:


[The eye] has a hemispherical form and a diameter of just over 2.5 cm (1 inch). It consists of very light material, probably bitumen paste. The surface of the artificial eye is covered with a thin layer of gold, engraved with a central circle (representing the iris) and gold lines patterned like sun rays. The female remains found with the artificial eye was 1.82 m tall (6 feet), much taller than ordinary women of her time. On both sides of the eye are drilled tiny holes, through which a golden thread could hold the eyeball in place. Since microscopic research has shown that the eye socket showed clear imprints of the golden thread, the eyeball must have been worn during her lifetime. The woman’s skeleton has been dated to between 2900 and 2800 BCE. 


So she was an extraordinarily tall woman walking around wearing an engraved golden eye patterned with rays like a tiny sun. What an awesome sight that must have been.
[via TYWKIWDBI]
This Geyser of Awesome's 12th most popular post of 2012.  Lots of people said they were going to draw what she looked like. If you have, let us know!

Here’s an awesome little piece of history:

Archaeologists in the Burnt City have discovered what appears to be an ancient prosthetic eye. What makes this discovery exceptionally awesome is the striking description of how the owner and her false eye would have appeared while she was still alive and blinking:

[The eye] has a hemispherical form and a diameter of just over 2.5 cm (1 inch). It consists of very light material, probably bitumen paste. The surface of the artificial eye is covered with a thin layer of gold, engraved with a central circle (representing the iris) and gold lines patterned like sun rays. The female remains found with the artificial eye was 1.82 m tall (6 feet), much taller than ordinary women of her time. On both sides of the eye are drilled tiny holes, through which a golden thread could hold the eyeball in place. Since microscopic research has shown that the eye socket showed clear imprints of the golden thread, the eyeball must have been worn during her lifetime. The woman’s skeleton has been dated to between 2900 and 2800 BCE. 

So she was an extraordinarily tall woman walking around wearing an engraved golden eye patterned with rays like a tiny sun. What an awesome sight that must have been.

[via TYWKIWDBI]

This Geyser of Awesome's 12th most popular post of 2012.  Lots of people said they were going to draw what she looked like. If you have, let us know!

(via archiemcphee)

Reblogged from archiemcphee

"Four mutant frogs with gold skin and red eyes, found by children in a grassy field in the town of Shimanto in Kochi prefecture, have gone on display at the nearby Shimanto River Gakuyukan science center. According to a center spokesperson who says the golden specimens are highly unusual, the 2.4-centimeter (almost 1-inch) amphibians appear to be black-spotted pond frogs (Pelophylax nigromaculata, a.k.a. Rana nigromaculata) whose skin turned gold because of an albino mutation that prevents the formation of pigment cells. With a run of bad luck that has brought shrinking visitor numbers and a recent theft of 1.25 million yen (about $10,000), the center hopes the golden frogs are a sign of good fortune to come. Oddly, they look sort of like feng shui money frogs (Chan Chu), except that money frogs have three legs.”
[via Pink Tentacle]

"Four mutant frogs with gold skin and red eyes, found by children in a grassy field in the town of Shimanto in Kochi prefecture, have gone on display at the nearby Shimanto River Gakuyukan science center. According to a center spokesperson who says the golden specimens are highly unusual, the 2.4-centimeter (almost 1-inch) amphibians appear to be black-spotted pond frogs (Pelophylax nigromaculata, a.k.a. Rana nigromaculata) whose skin turned gold because of an albino mutation that prevents the formation of pigment cells. With a run of bad luck that has brought shrinking visitor numbers and a recent theft of 1.25 million yen (about $10,000), the center hopes the golden frogs are a sign of good fortune to come. Oddly, they look sort of like feng shui money frogs (Chan Chu), except that money frogs have three legs.”

[via Pink Tentacle]

Here’s an awesome little piece of history:
Archaeologists in the Burnt City have discovered what appears to be an ancient prosthetic eye. What makes this discovery exceptionally awesome is the striking description of how the owner and her false eye would have appeared while she was still alive and blinking:


[The eye] has a hemispherical form and a diameter of just over 2.5 cm (1 inch). It consists of very light material, probably bitumen paste. The surface of the artificial eye is covered with a thin layer of gold, engraved with a central circle (representing the iris) and gold lines patterned like sun rays. The female remains found with the artificial eye was 1.82 m tall (6 feet), much taller than ordinary women of her time. On both sides of the eye are drilled tiny holes, through which a golden thread could hold the eyeball in place. Since microscopic research has shown that the eye socket showed clear imprints of the golden thread, the eyeball must have been worn during her lifetime. The woman’s skeleton has been dated to between 2900 and 2800 BCE. 


So she was an extraordinarily tall woman walking around wearing an engraved golden eye patterned with rays like a tiny sun. What an awesome sight that must have been.
[via TYWKIWDBI]

Here’s an awesome little piece of history:

Archaeologists in the Burnt City have discovered what appears to be an ancient prosthetic eye. What makes this discovery exceptionally awesome is the striking description of how the owner and her false eye would have appeared while she was still alive and blinking:

[The eye] has a hemispherical form and a diameter of just over 2.5 cm (1 inch). It consists of very light material, probably bitumen paste. The surface of the artificial eye is covered with a thin layer of gold, engraved with a central circle (representing the iris) and gold lines patterned like sun rays. The female remains found with the artificial eye was 1.82 m tall (6 feet), much taller than ordinary women of her time. On both sides of the eye are drilled tiny holes, through which a golden thread could hold the eyeball in place. Since microscopic research has shown that the eye socket showed clear imprints of the golden thread, the eyeball must have been worn during her lifetime. The woman’s skeleton has been dated to between 2900 and 2800 BCE. 

So she was an extraordinarily tall woman walking around wearing an engraved golden eye patterned with rays like a tiny sun. What an awesome sight that must have been.

[via TYWKIWDBI]