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38 posts tagged Hungry

This awesomely freaky Face Bank is one of those things you may want to put away or at least turn to face it away from you at night before you turn out the lights and go to sleep. It’s a battery-powered robotic coin-eating bank whose creepy face eagerly gobbles up your coins, but probably plans to start feasting on your soul as soon as you’ve run out of change.

"It’s hard to resist saving your change with this unique piggy bank. Wave some money in front of his face to hear his stomach grumble. Put a coin in his mouth and he’ll noisily gobble up it up, thanking you with a loud burp."

The nightmarish Face Bank comes in original size, “Big Size”, textured, and Face Bank 2, which features a large nose instead of eyes. No matter which version you own, we’ve got a sneaking suspicion that the bank may try to bite off your fingers the moment you decide to retrieve your saved coins.

[via Laughing Squid]

Source Laughing Squid

These technicolor ants were created by Indian scientist Dr. Mohamed Babu, who fed them dyed sugar water. He was inspired to conduct this surprisingly pretty experiment after his wife noticed that some ants outside their home had turned white after drinking spilt milk.

Imagine if your body changed color every time you ate a bunch of something new. Would that make picking out clothes in the morning more or less difficult? Thank goodness we don’t have semi-transparent abdomen like these hungry little ants.

Click here to learn more about how Dr. Babu captured these colorful photos.

[via Colossal and Dailymail.co.uk]

Are you ready for another heartwarming visit to the Department of Unexpected Interspecies Friendship? In Black Mountains, Wales there lives a Shetland pony mare who, despite already having a foal of her own, took an orphan lamb into her care. She nursed both babies and kept an eye on them while they cuddled together and slept. Yeah, that’s pretty awesome.

Horserider and equine vet Georgina Hirst, 29, did a double take when she spotted the pair feeding while out riding on Hay Bluff. “I was out riding one day and I spotted a baby lamb feeding,” she said. “The first time I saw it I couldn’t quite believe it - I thought I might be imagining it. But then I saw it again and again over the space of about a week.
“It seemed the Shetland mare had adopted the orphaned lamb and was letting it feed from her. Shetlands are not normally so amenable. The lamb was obviously hungry and it’s quite amazing that it learnt to suckle from the mare. It might have just copied the foal.”
The vet, from Hay on the Wye, Powys, added: “Trying to get mares to adopt foals can be very challenging so it’s incredible the mare was so receptive of the lamb. She would even stand guard while the foal and the lamb slept cuddled together.”

When it became apparent that both lamb and foal weren’t receiving adequate nourishment (the mare simply couldn’t produce enough milk for two), Ms Hirst stepped in. Thanks to an identity mark on the lamb, she was able to track down the farmer who retrieved the lamb. Now the lamb is bottle fed and the foal gets all the milk it needs from its big-hearted mum. 
Here’s hoping those two young friends will meet again some day to frolic and reminisce about those early days spent together with mom.
[via Neatorama]

Are you ready for another heartwarming visit to the Department of Unexpected Interspecies Friendship? In Black Mountains, Wales there lives a Shetland pony mare who, despite already having a foal of her own, took an orphan lamb into her care. She nursed both babies and kept an eye on them while they cuddled together and slept. Yeah, that’s pretty awesome.

Horserider and equine vet Georgina Hirst, 29, did a double take when she spotted the pair feeding while out riding on Hay Bluff. “I was out riding one day and I spotted a baby lamb feeding,” she said. “The first time I saw it I couldn’t quite believe it - I thought I might be imagining it. But then I saw it again and again over the space of about a week.

“It seemed the Shetland mare had adopted the orphaned lamb and was letting it feed from her. Shetlands are not normally so amenable. The lamb was obviously hungry and it’s quite amazing that it learnt to suckle from the mare. It might have just copied the foal.”

The vet, from Hay on the Wye, Powys, added: “Trying to get mares to adopt foals can be very challenging so it’s incredible the mare was so receptive of the lamb. She would even stand guard while the foal and the lamb slept cuddled together.”

When it became apparent that both lamb and foal weren’t receiving adequate nourishment (the mare simply couldn’t produce enough milk for two), Ms Hirst stepped in. Thanks to an identity mark on the lamb, she was able to track down the farmer who retrieved the lamb. Now the lamb is bottle fed and the foal gets all the milk it needs from its big-hearted mum. 

Here’s hoping those two young friends will meet again some day to frolic and reminisce about those early days spent together with mom.

[via Neatorama]

We love this photo of a young woman happily posing inside the gaping mouth of an awesome anamorphic painting. The hungry 3D painting is part of a week-long exhibition at the Garland Shopping Center in Guiyang, Guizhou province, China. The free exhibition actively encourages visitors to interact with the artwork.
Photo by ChinaFotoPress/Getty Images
[via Telegraph.co.uk]

We love this photo of a young woman happily posing inside the gaping mouth of an awesome anamorphic painting. The hungry 3D painting is part of a week-long exhibition at the Garland Shopping Center in Guiyang, Guizhou province, China. The free exhibition actively encourages visitors to interact with the artwork.

Photo by ChinaFotoPress/Getty Images

[via Telegraph.co.uk]

For a series of photos entitled Hunger Pains, New York-based photographer Ted Sabarese dressed his models in foods they were personally craving: bread, pasta, meat, vegetables, fruit and, our personal favourite, waffle pants.

The Geyser of Awesome salutes anyone who not only loves waffles so much that they’d wear them as a garment, but also be able to pull off the wearing off them with as much style as the beautifully-bearded model photographed by Ted SabareseWe are impressed and hungry. We’d gladly take a serving of what each one of these models is wearing. (Followed by seconds of the waffles.)

[via Design Taxi]

Just in time for Valentine’s Day, here’s “Teddy Bear“ the North American Porcupine, resident of the Zooniversity, insatiable lover of corn, and previously featured here, feasting on a heart-shaped box full of his favourite treat - corn on the cob. But wait, what happens once the corn is all gone and Teddy is still hungry? You’ll have to watch the video to find out.

Oh how we love Teddy’s delightful yummy sounds

Happy Valentine’s Day Teddy!

[via Neatorama]

This awesome and macabre object is an 18th century automaton from Mysore, India known as ‘Tipu’s Tiger.’ The pictures will lead you to assume it’s a small toy, but both man and beast are life-size and made of carved and painted wood. As you can see, the mechanical tiger is in the middle of devouring the man, who is wearing European dress appropriate to the 1790s.

"Concealed in the bodywork is a mechanical pipe-organ with several parts, all operated simultaneously by a crank-handle emerging from the tiger’s shoulder. Inside the tiger and the man are weighted bellows with pipes attached. Turning the handle pumps the bellows and controls the air-flow to simulate the growls of the tiger and cries of the victim. The cries are varied by the approach of the hand towards the mouth and away, as the left arm - the only moving part - is raised and lowered."

So how did this amazing toy come to exist?

"The Tipu Sultan, ruler of Mysore from 1782-1799, adopted the tiger as his royal symbol. He fought many battles against the British throughout his reign. So after a particularly painful defeat against the British:

He ordered the walls of houses in Seringapatam to be painted with scenes of tigers mauling Europeans. Live tigers were kept in the city and there were stories of prisoners thrown into the tiger-pits.

Tipu must have been intrigued by a news item widely reported in India and Britain in 1793, only months after he had been compelled to sign the hated Treaty of Seringapatam. A young Englishman out shooting near Calcutta had been carried off by ‘an immense riyal tiger…four and a half feet high and nine long’, sustaining fatal injuries. The victim was the only son of General Sir Hector Munro, who had been concerned in a crushing defeat inflicted on Haidar and Tipu in the second Mysore War.

The death of young Munro delighted the Tipu Sultan, so he commissioned the creation of this macabre automaton.”

Head over to the Victoria and Albert Museum website to learn more about Tipu’s Tiger and its history. If you’re in London you can head over to the museum itself to see Tipu’s Tiger in person!

[via Neatorama]