America’s vice presidents have never looked so awesome. These tentacular ink and watercolor portraits are the work of Los Angeles-based artist and writer Jonathan Crow. His ongoing Veeptopus series depicts each US vice president with an octopus hanging out on his head (although he made a slight, yet somehow very appropriate, exception for Dick Cheney).

The portraits often accompanied by interesting historical tidbits and sometimes Crow deviates from straight cephalopod-VP portraiture to create wonderfully weird(er) pieces such as President Taft riding a badger.

Prints of the Veeptopus series are available via Jonathan Crow’s Etsy shop.

[via io9]

Singapore-based visual artist and art instructor Ivan Hoo uses colored pencils and pastels to create awesome illustrations on wood panels that are both photorealistic and anamorphic. Hoo’s meticulous drawings look so incredibly lifelike that, when the finished pieces are paired with the actual objects depicted in the drawings, it’s tricky to tell which is real and which is the drawing.

“By working on wood, it gives me a lot of dimension and ideas to create something close to reality and it works really well with pastels, too” Hoo explains. “I started to experiment on wood some years back with mainly portraits as my subject before going further with a different concept.”

Follow Ivan Hoo on Instagram to check out more of his astonishing artwork.

[via WHUDAT and My Modern Metropolis]

The mouthwatering sound of sizzling bacon is something we enjoy almost as much as eating the bacon itself. Here UK-based illustrator James Chapman teaches us the delectable sounds of sizzling as they’re spoken in five different languages.

Thank God it’s Fry-day.
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Follow James Chapman here on Tumblr at chapmangamo to learn many more forms of onomatopoeia in other languages.

The mouthwatering sound of sizzling bacon is something we enjoy almost as much as eating the bacon itself. Here UK-based illustrator James Chapman teaches us the delectable sounds of sizzling as they’re spoken in five different languages.

Thank God it’s Fry-day.

twitter | facebook | instagram | shop

Follow James Chapman here on Tumblr at chapmangamo to learn many more forms of onomatopoeia in other languages.

Reblogged from chapmangamo

Cthulhu fhtagn and oh boy, that sure is some swell cosmic dread!
This dreadfully awesome mash-up of Mickey Mouse and our embodiment of ancient cosmic evil, aka Mickthulhu Mouse, is the work of BeastPop, Hickory, NC-based freelance artist and conduit of ancient evil (previously featured here).

"Hiya, folks! In a clever scheme to better equip humanity to embrace and serve the Elder Gods, an adorable mascot was created to represent the great cosmic entity Cthulhu and sell heaps of merchandise."

T-shirts available here.
Visit BeastPop’s Facebook page or follow him here on Tumblr at beastpop to check out more of his monstrous artwork.
[via Neatorama]

Cthulhu fhtagn and oh boy, that sure is some swell cosmic dread!

This dreadfully awesome mash-up of Mickey Mouse and our embodiment of ancient cosmic evil, aka Mickthulhu Mouse, is the work of BeastPop, Hickory, NC-based freelance artist and conduit of ancient evil (previously featured here).

"Hiya, folks! In a clever scheme to better equip humanity to embrace and serve the Elder Gods, an adorable mascot was created to represent the great cosmic entity Cthulhu and sell heaps of merchandise."

T-shirts available here.

Visit BeastPop’s Facebook page or follow him here on Tumblr at beastpop to check out more of his monstrous artwork.

[via Neatorama]

American humorous illustrator Rodney Pike has undertaken an awesomely silly project. He’s been using his Photoshop skills to insert the singularly goofy face of British entertainer Rowan Atkinson in character as Mr. Bean into a variety of portraits by the Old Masters. Judging by the lacy panties held in the hands of Thomas Howard (top image), painted by Hans Holbein the Younger in 1539, Pike sometimes tinkers with more than the faces in the portraits.

If it weren’t for the befuddled expression forever worn on Mr. Bean’s face, these images could be a taste of additional series of Blackadder we’ve always wanted.

Pike says he plans to complete 30 pieces for his Mr. Bean Collection, so keep an eye on his website or DeviantArt page for additional pieces.

[via Ego-AlterEgo]

Mexican artist Ricardo Solis uses oil paint, ink and other media to create fantastic depictions of how various animal species are created by teams of Lilliputian workers. Strips of electrical tape are unrolled and applied to give a zebra its stripes while poison dart frogs are carefully painted. A grizzly bear’s furry coat is painstakingly woven and hot-air balloons are used to pour paint onto a flamingo and position a pangolin’s horny overlapping scales. The hippo gets its substantial size and shape thanks to a generous inflation of helium.

Visit Ricardo Solis’ Behance page to check out more of his awesome animals under construction. Prints are available via Solis’ website.

[via Lost At E Minor]

Awesome Anamorphic Artwork isn’t restricted to walls, floors and sketchbooks. There’s a whole amazing subset that, instead of having the viewer stand in just the right spot, requires looking at flat image or sculpture reflected in a cylindrical mirror in order to see it properly.

Last month the folks at Bored Panda assembled a fascinating collection of 23 examples of this mind-bending art form. Here you see pieces by István Orosz, Jonty Hurwitz, Vera Bugatti and Awtar Singh Virdi respectively.

Click here to view the entire post.

[via Bored Panda]

French art director and illustrator Troqman makes clever use of both his pens and his sketchbooks as well as his surroundings in order to create entertaining drawings of characters appearing to interact with the real world. Our favorite pieces involve characters on multiple pages or sketchbooks interacting with each other as well as the 3D world. And then there’s Spider-Man who think’s he just found his long-lost father.

Troqman calls this playful hobby Cartoon Bombing and you can see a lot more of it over o Instagram or right here on Tumblr at troqman.

[via Bored Panda]

Toronto, Ontario-based artist Ruth Oosterman collaborates with her two-year-old daughter Eve to create imaginative paintings that feel as though they’ve been lifted from the pages of a fantastic series of storybooks we’re now dying to read. Here Oosterman describe their process:

As all of our collaborations start, my two year old creates her own sketch with an ink pen which I then use to turn into a watercolor painting. The sketch is completely her own with no instruction given from me, I simply use her creativity to inspire me to create a painting.

Oosterman says that she can usually either discern a picture hidden inside Eve’s sketch or her daughter will have chatted with her about what she was drawing. But sometimes there is no conteext andshe has to let her own imagination run with it.

I try to work quickly and let imagination and play take root into the painting rather than taking it to seriously, this way I can encourage Eve’s contribution without making it to “grownup.”

Visit Ruth Oosterman’s blog and her YouTube channel to check out more of her wonderful collaborations with young Eve.

Prints of some of their creations are available via the Eve’s Imagination Etsy shop.

[via Bored Panda]