We’ve just learned about another talented artist who uses the humble disposable coffee cup as their canvas. Jimmy T. enhances his morning coffee cups with striking pop culture-inspired drawings and then leaves them behind for other people to discover. Brightening the days of random strangers with unexpected and thoroughly marvelous artwork is awesome.

You can follow Jimmy’s ongoing series of geektastically illustrated coffee cups right here on Tumblr at morningcoffeecupart or on the Morning Coffee Cup Art on Facebook page

[via Geeks are Sexy]

Malaysian artist Monica Lee says she’s addicted to details. Her photorealistic pencil drawings are so intensely detailed that they could easily trick us into believing they were photos were it not for the art supplies photographed nearby. Some of these complex pieces take Lee 3 to 4 weeks to complete, yet she makes it look effortless. After working as a digital artist for 12 years, she’s decided to pursue her dream job working as an illustrator and by the looks of things, she’s off to an awesome start.

You can check out more of Monica Lee’s astonishing graphite illustrations on her Facebook page and Instagram account.

[via Design Taxi and Scene360]

When October Jones (previously featured here) isn’t sharing text messages sent by his dog or transforming his fellow train commuters by drawing new heads for them on post-it notes, he’s creating awesomely empowering messages and leaving them for his fellow travelers to find inside seatback trays on the train.

Follow October Jones on Twitter for more of his entertaining and inspirational sticky note escapades.

[via Neatorama]

Artist and illustrator Dave DeVries takes children’s drawings of imaginary monsters and superheroes and uses a combination of acrylic paint, color pencils and an airbrush to render them with awesome realism. Part of his process includes interviewing the child artists to get an even better feel for what their creatures really look like. What begin as strange and cute doodles end up as truly terrifying, yet sometimes also hilarious, glimpses of a child’s imagination brought to life.

"It began at the Jersey Shore in 1998, where my niece Jessica often filled my sketchbook with doodles. While I stared at them, I wondered if color, texture and shading could be applied for a 3D effect. As a painter, I made cartoons look three dimensional every day for the likes of Marvel and DC comics, so why couldn’t I apply those same techniques to a kid’s drawing? That was it… no research, no years of toil, just the curiosity of seeing Jessica’s drawings come to life."

This ongoing project is called The Monster Engine. DeVries is currently accepting commissions for new pieces. He also published a book and limited edition poster of his Monster Engine illustrations, both of which are available here.

[via Lost At E Minor and Marvelous]

Oakland, CA-based artist and illustrator Justin DeVine must’ve been channelling the Black Lodge when he created his wonderfully weird series of watercolor illustrations combining Twin Peaks characters with The Muppets. It’s an awesome pop culture mashup that works so well, we can’t believe we’d never considered it before.

You can see the entire series right here on Tumblr at Jason Devine’s sticksstonesandherringbones. Prints are also available via INPRNT.

[via io9]

What’s your patronus? Artist Alicia Braumberger created this whimsical (and sometimes awesomely adorably) “Spotter’s Guide to Rare and Unusual Patronuses,” which makes us wish a person could have more than one:

Just one of those things that I always wondered about. Stags and otters are all very well, but what if you end up with a tiny chameleon or giant blue whale? I mean, it could be a giant tub of nutella…

Anyway, so glad I got around to doing this pic -drawing the less attractive animals was awesome.

Popped it up on Redbubble because they have tote bags and cushions now which is just wow - can grab it also on cards or posters - check it out here!

Reblogged from alicia-mb

These strangely hypnotic gifs are the work of Dundee, Scotland-based illustrator Sam Lyon. He calls them Jelly Gummies. There’s something about these fleshy, pulsating, amorphous creatures - a combination of anthropomorphism, creepiness, and our inexplicable suspicion that they’d be both fun to chew on and pleasing to taste - that makes them awesome.

You can find more of Lyon’s perpetually mutating Jelly Gummies right here on Tumblr at jellygummies. He also has a Jelly Gummies Etsy shop, just in case you’d like to invite some of this wonderfully squishy weirdness into your home.

[via designboom]

We just discovered an awesome new addition to our collection of reinterpretations of The Gashlycrumb Tinies by the one and only Edward Gorey. Instead of an alphabet of ill-fated kiddies, the creators of Brentalfloss have chosen to depict the deaths of familiar video game characters. Behold “The Game Over Tinies.”

The Brentalfloss website appears to be down at the moment, but you can get a closer look at each geektastically macabre panel in this morbidly delightful music video. Poor Aerith, we still miss her terribly…

Prints of “The Game Over Tinies” can be purchased here, courtesy of Level Up Studios.

[via Nerdist]

Artist and illustrator Stephen Andrade painted this awesome movie mashup depicting the giant worms from Tremors, Beetlejuice and Dune competing against each other in The Great Sandworm Race. He also created a brilliant version in which the image was digitally enhanced to look like a vintage pulp book cover. Andrade created the painting last year for Gallery1988's Crazy 4 Cult 7 group exhibition in New York City.

Visit Stephen Andrade’s website to check out more of his artwork.

[via GeekTyrant]