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197 posts tagged Japan

"I’m so hungry I could eat a horse the world!” This weirdly enticing fried chicken burger is served on a blue and green planet Earth bun. It’s on the menu at the Orbi Yokohama science museum, a collaborative creation by the BBC and SEGA located in Yokohama, Japan.

We already love learning about and doing science, but the opportunity to have science-y fun while also eating some unnaturally blue food is practically worth the price of the plane ticket.

[via Kotaku]

Summer means spectacular sand sculpture season. Here we see an international team of sand sculptors work on various large and elaborate sections of the 2014 Yokohama Sand Art Exhibition in Yokohama, Japan. This year’s theme is ‘Culture City of East Asia’ and the exhibition producer, sand sculptor Katsuhiko Chaen, invited artists from around the world to help create sand sculptures of World Heritage and historical buildings located in China, Japan and South Korea.

The sculptors are using sand taken from the Tottori Sand Dunes, Japan’s largest coastal dunes. So much sand has been brought in for the exhibition that they even had some for visitors to play with. The largest piece measures nearly 53 feet long by 10 feet tall. That’s an awesome amount of sand.

Photos by Chris McGrath/Getty Images

Visit Design You Trust for additional images.

Today the Department of Awesome Parenting travels to Japan where a creative mother, who goes by the name Sasariri on Twitter, creates beautiful bento lunches that are both delicious and educational. Each of the meals pictured here are edible geography lessons, each one identifying a different Japanese prefecture by both shape and name.

Sasariri says she’s now made a bento lunch for every single prefecture, complete with countless kawaii details. Visit RocketNews24 to view many more.

[via RocketNews24]

Before today it had never occurred to us that birds and bananas are at all similar. Now that we’ve seen this wonderfully weird and ridiculously cute series of parrot-banana hybrid Epoch Gashapon toys, we’re dying to see how other fruit and fauna pair up.

According to RocketNews24, these banana birdies are selling so well that the manufacturer has plans for a whole series of “parrot-foodstuff mash-ups.” The parrot-mushroom hybrids seen in the bottom image are coming out next.

Photos via @mel__t, Netorabo, @suicarin, @yasuu22, @akky_1981, and @nyairu1.

The parrot-banana series actually includes a number of birds from the parrot family from little cockatoos to the splashy Macau.

[via RocketNews24]

Kutani Choemon is a Japanese pottery shop that’s been operating since 1879, creating exquisite pieces of handmade, hand-painted pottery. However just because their business is 130 years old and they still create their lovely wares in the traditional fashion doesn’t mean they’ve no interest in incorporating modern subject matter into their work.

Here you can see musicians, skateboarders and surfers delicately rendered in beautiful blue Kutani color glazes. Of course our favorite piece is the flute player whose head bears a striking resemblance to our very own Horse Head Mask.

Visit the Kutani Choemon shop to view more of their wonderful, whimsical creations.

[via Colossal]

Japanese artist Miho Yata combines knitting with stop-motion animation to creates short films that she calls “Yatamimation.” Her latest piece is this charming production, entitled Film Muffler, made using long knitted mifflers that depicts a sweet love story in the old-timey style of silent films, complete with a cute piano score.

Visit the Yatamimation website to check out more of Miho Yata’s crafty creations.

[via Make:Craft]

Regular loaves of bread are so boring compared to these awesomely unsettling loaves perfectly shaped to resemble giant stag beetles. According to the folks at RocketNews24, the bread is labeled as “kuwagata, which means ‘stag beetle’ in Japanese” and it only costs 280 yen (US$2.74) per giant bread beetle. That sounds like a bargain to us.
These insectoid loaves were photographed by Japanese Twitter user tono_donoyukko who said, “I wanted to introduce this shocking bread I found yesterday.” We’re so glad she did. Now we can’t stop thinking about all the situations in which we’d enjoy eating freaky beetle bread.
[via RocketNews24]

Regular loaves of bread are so boring compared to these awesomely unsettling loaves perfectly shaped to resemble giant stag beetles. According to the folks at RocketNews24, the bread is labeled as “kuwagata, which means ‘stag beetle’ in Japanese” and it only costs 280 yen (US$2.74) per giant bread beetle. That sounds like a bargain to us.

These insectoid loaves were photographed by Japanese Twitter user tono_donoyukko who said, “I wanted to introduce this shocking bread I found yesterday.” We’re so glad she did. Now we can’t stop thinking about all the situations in which we’d enjoy eating freaky beetle bread.

[via RocketNews24]

The Department of Magnificent Manicures is hungry at the sight of these delectable sushi nails. They were handmade by Japanese Twitter user Ayamon, who lives in Nagoya, Japan and doesn’t actually think her fancy new nails are very appetizing:

“I made sushi nails, but they’re kinda gross lol!”

We still think they’re mouthwateringly awesome.

[via RocketNews24]

Let’s take a moment to appreciate more of exquisitely awesome floral Kanzashi hair ornaments created by Japanese artist Sakae (previously featured here). Each delicate piece is handcrafted from resin and, depending upon their complexity, takes between 3 and 30 days to complete.

To view even more of these magnificent wearable resin flowers, visit Sakae’s Facebook page as well as her Flickr account.

[via Colossal]

Today the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders shares the work of Japanese model artist Akihiro Morohoshi who, after years of making traditional model railroads, decided to switch things up by creating awesomely detailed miniature railroad dioramas atop and inside everyday objects such as cans of Pringles, matchboxes, gumball machines and electric guitars.

To make the scenes look good as a whole, Morohoshi had to pay attention to every minute details of his pieces: from the custom-made signs and vehicles, to the weathering of each object to make them look lifelike.

Visit Akihiro Morohoshi’s website to check out more of his marvelous miniature railway scenes, preferably while you have some Pringles in hand because those particular models make us hungry for chips.

[via Design Taxi and Spoon & Tamago]