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27 posts tagged Jewelry

After you’ve awarded your cat with the World’s Best Cat Trophy, treat yourself (or your neighborhood Crazy Cat Lady) to a pair of earrings custom-made to look like your favorite feline. Let your kitty dangle from your the ears to show the world just how awesome they are.

These pieces of fabulous feline finery are the work of Leo the Cat Gallery, an online Japanese shop that uses photos of your pet to custom-craft earrings in their likeness. Leo the Cat’s earrings are available in four styles: Head Only, Full Body, I Spotted My Kitty, which depicts your cat peeking out from behind your earlobes, and the top-of-the-line option, My Kitty’s Hanging On, which features your cat dangling from your ears. Hang in there kitty!

"After sending in your cat’s photo, Leo will draw up three different designs, based on your requests such as colors you prefer or additional accouterments you’d like. For customers with gold allergies, earrings made with plastic resin parts are also available."

Leo the Cat Gallery is currently working through a backlog of orders, so they’re aren’t accepting new orders until September at the earliest. In the meantime you can follow them on Instagram to see many more photos of their fine feline fashion accessories.

[via RocketNews24]

Ann Arbor, Michigan-based artist Susan McLeary creates exquisite pieces of one-of-a-kind living jewelry using small succulent plants mounted on bronze bases. Each piece can be worn for 3-4 weeks, after which the plants may be gently removed from their bases and planted in a pot or garden.

Visit the PassionflowerToWear Etsy shop to view more of McLeary’s beautiful botanical jewelry.

[via Design Taxi]

Somerville, MA-based artist Judith Klausner (previously featured here) has developed a delightful line of jewelry based on From Scratch, her series of food-based art for which she combines food and traditional handicrafts. Klausner has adapted the process she used to make her Cereal Samplers, cross-stitch samplers made of Corn Chex cereal, to create wearable handmade monogram necklaces.

"Each letter is delicately hand cross-stitched onto a piece of Corn Chex cereal, embedded in resin, and finished with sterling silver plated findings on an 18" sterling silver chain.

It seems fairly certain that no two pieces of Chex are exactly alike, so these exquisite necklaces aren’t just unusual, they’re also unique. If you would like a personalized cereal necklace and/or know someone else who’d love one too, all you have to do is visit Klausner’s ArtSnacks Etsy shop and pick a letter and thread color. She also accepts custom orders for pieces made of 2 or 3 initials.

Visit ArtSnacks to view more cross-stitched Chex necklaces and Judith Klausner’s website to check out more of her awesome artwork.

Holy psychedelic rocks, Batman! These awesome stones aren’t stone at all. They’re made of a substance called Fordite, also known as Detroit or Motor Agate. All of those beautiful layers are old automobile paint, countless layers of it, that accumulated in car factories over the years back when they cars were spray-painted by hand and excess paint dripped onto the metal tracks and skids that transported cars through the paint shop during the painting process. Thanks to the high heat that was used to bake the paint onto the cars, the layers hardened enough to be cut and polished into these beautiful industrial gems.

"Not much is known about how the pieces left the old factories, but it is assumed that ‘some crafty workers with an eye for beauty realized that this unique byproduct was worth salvaging. It was super-cured, patterned-like psychedelic agate, and could be cut and polished with relative ease!’"

Today this captivating material is shaped and polished into rings, necklaces, earrings, and of course beautiful stones like you see here. Because the painting process that created this substance no longer exists, Fordite is considered to be increasingly rare. But there’s still enough around to get some for yourself if you like. Check out the Fordite website to learn more.

Visit My Modern Metropolis for additional photos.

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.
Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.
"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."
[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.

Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.

"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."

[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

This delectably geeky Cherry Pi Pie Necklace was handmade by Charlottesville, VA-based sisters and miniature food artists Jessica and Susan Partain. The itty-bitty pie sits in a tiny, shiny pie plate and was hand-sculpted using polymer clay and premo. Even the cherries were each made by hand. If you look closely you’ll see that the crust features hand-pinched indentations and has been browned to perfection. These ladies clearly know good pie. It’s so pretty, it’s almost a pity you can’t actually eat it.

Visit Jessica and Susan’s Etsy shop, Inedible Jewelry, to check out many more of their wonderful piece of inedible, wearable miniature food art.

Click here to order your very own Cherry Pi Pie Necklace.

[via Foodess]

A couple weeks ago we featured necklaces with scented miniature food pendants and now we’ve found the perfect rings to match. Danvers, MA-based artist Casey the Crafter uses polymer clay to make each of these realistic and beautifully detailed food-themed rings by hand. In addition to rings, she also sculpts wonderful standalone pieces, which are perfect for dollhouses or simply as kawaii collectibles.

Check out CaseysMiniShop on Etsy to view more of her marvelous miniature creations.

[via That’s Nerdalicious! and Neatorama]

Nothing says “Our love will last forever.” like a tiny gold squid encircling your ring finger. This tentacular little beauty was handmade by Portland, OR-based jeweler Cheyenne Weil of gin & butterflies. She custom-makes each Squid Wedding Band by hand-carving the ring in wax and then casting it using the lost-wax method.

"This ring is a highly detailed piece with the squid and water/wave design flowing all the way around the ring, leaving no particular part "up." It is a nice 8mm in width, over 2mm thick, and has a delicious weighty feel."

Click here for more information and then check out the rest of Cheyenne’s gin & butterflies shop.

[via Fashionably Geek]

These adorable miniature food pendants are the work of an artist named Mei and her Minnesota-based company Tiny Hands. Each beautifully detailed, made-to-order piece is handcrafted and… wait for it… smells exactly as delicious as it looks. That’s right, the waffles and pancakes smell like butter, sweetened batter and maple syrup, the fried egg smells like mouthwatering bacon, and then there’s a heavenly slice of blueberry pie, cupcakes, donuts, s’mores, candies, chocolates and even a corn dog. Kawaii!

But that’s not all. Mei also makes scented food-shaped rings, bracelets, earrings, cellphone straps, bookmarks and more. Click here to view the entire range of Tiny Hands food jewelry.

[via Incredible Things]

This gorgeous, tentacular object is an American chatelaine dating back to 1887. A chatelaine is a decorative belt hook or clasp worn at the waist with a series of chains suspended from it. They were worn by many housekeepers during the 19th century, with each tentacle chain fastened to a useful household appendage such as scissors, thimble, watch, key, vinaigrette, household seal, etc.
This stunning sterling silver octopus chatelaine was made by the Gorham Manufacturing Company and is part of the jewelry collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
[via Retronaut]

This gorgeous, tentacular object is an American chatelaine dating back to 1887. A chatelaine is a decorative belt hook or clasp worn at the waist with a series of chains suspended from it. They were worn by many housekeepers during the 19th century, with each tentacle chain fastened to a useful household appendage such as scissors, thimble, watch, key, vinaigrette, household seal, etc.

This stunning sterling silver octopus chatelaine was made by the Gorham Manufacturing Company and is part of the jewelry collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

[via Retronaut]