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23 posts tagged Jewelry

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.
Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.
"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."
[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.

Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.

"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."

[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

This delectably geeky Cherry Pi Pie Necklace was handmade by Charlottesville, VA-based sisters and miniature food artists Jessica and Susan Partain. The itty-bitty pie sits in a tiny, shiny pie plate and was hand-sculpted using polymer clay and premo. Even the cherries were each made by hand. If you look closely you’ll see that the crust features hand-pinched indentations and has been browned to perfection. These ladies clearly know good pie. It’s so pretty, it’s almost a pity you can’t actually eat it.

Visit Jessica and Susan’s Etsy shop, Inedible Jewelry, to check out many more of their wonderful piece of inedible, wearable miniature food art.

Click here to order your very own Cherry Pi Pie Necklace.

[via Foodess]

A couple weeks ago we featured necklaces with scented miniature food pendants and now we’ve found the perfect rings to match. Danvers, MA-based artist Casey the Crafter uses polymer clay to make each of these realistic and beautifully detailed food-themed rings by hand. In addition to rings, she also sculpts wonderful standalone pieces, which are perfect for dollhouses or simply as kawaii collectibles.

Check out CaseysMiniShop on Etsy to view more of her marvelous miniature creations.

[via That’s Nerdalicious! and Neatorama]

Nothing says “Our love will last forever.” like a tiny gold squid encircling your ring finger. This tentacular little beauty was handmade by Portland, OR-based jeweler Cheyenne Weil of gin & butterflies. She custom-makes each Squid Wedding Band by hand-carving the ring in wax and then casting it using the lost-wax method.

"This ring is a highly detailed piece with the squid and water/wave design flowing all the way around the ring, leaving no particular part "up." It is a nice 8mm in width, over 2mm thick, and has a delicious weighty feel."

Click here for more information and then check out the rest of Cheyenne’s gin & butterflies shop.

[via Fashionably Geek]

These adorable miniature food pendants are the work of an artist named Mei and her Minnesota-based company Tiny Hands. Each beautifully detailed, made-to-order piece is handcrafted and… wait for it… smells exactly as delicious as it looks. That’s right, the waffles and pancakes smell like butter, sweetened batter and maple syrup, the fried egg smells like mouthwatering bacon, and then there’s a heavenly slice of blueberry pie, cupcakes, donuts, s’mores, candies, chocolates and even a corn dog. Kawaii!

But that’s not all. Mei also makes scented food-shaped rings, bracelets, earrings, cellphone straps, bookmarks and more. Click here to view the entire range of Tiny Hands food jewelry.

[via Incredible Things]

This gorgeous, tentacular object is an American chatelaine dating back to 1887. A chatelaine is a decorative belt hook or clasp worn at the waist with a series of chains suspended from it. They were worn by many housekeepers during the 19th century, with each tentacle chain fastened to a useful household appendage such as scissors, thimble, watch, key, vinaigrette, household seal, etc.
This stunning sterling silver octopus chatelaine was made by the Gorham Manufacturing Company and is part of the jewelry collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
[via Retronaut]

This gorgeous, tentacular object is an American chatelaine dating back to 1887. A chatelaine is a decorative belt hook or clasp worn at the waist with a series of chains suspended from it. They were worn by many housekeepers during the 19th century, with each tentacle chain fastened to a useful household appendage such as scissors, thimble, watch, key, vinaigrette, household seal, etc.

This stunning sterling silver octopus chatelaine was made by the Gorham Manufacturing Company and is part of the jewelry collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

[via Retronaut]

Denture Jewelry - the stuff of nightmares for some (we’re looking at you, Odontophobes), for others perhaps, a dream come true. We think it’s a bit of both and thus pretty awesome. These bracelets and hair combs were handmade by Mr. Basic using dental acrylic and can be purchased from an Etsy shop called ConcaveOblivion.

[via Incredible Things and Geekologie]

Caddisfly larvae construct silk cases decorated with pieces of gravel, sand, twigs, snail shells, and other natural debris. This most often happens during winter months, so the theory behind this behaviour is that they do it to protect themselves from the cold, harsh weather.
However if you’re a Caddisfly larvae in the care of French artist Hubert Duprat, you’ll have an entirely different supply of materials with this to create your protective case:

Duprat “introduced beads, pearls, turquoise, and 18-karat gold pieces into their environment and let them construct tiny gilded sculptures. Duprat has been collaborating with the larvae since the 1980s. Learn more about his work at Cabinet Magazine.”

Photos by Jean-Luc Fournier via Cabinet
[via Laughing Squid]

Caddisfly larvae construct silk cases decorated with pieces of gravel, sand, twigs, snail shells, and other natural debris. This most often happens during winter months, so the theory behind this behaviour is that they do it to protect themselves from the cold, harsh weather.

However if you’re a Caddisfly larvae in the care of French artist Hubert Duprat, you’ll have an entirely different supply of materials with this to create your protective case:

Duprat “introduced beads, pearls, turquoise, and 18-karat gold pieces into their environment and let them construct tiny gilded sculptures. Duprat has been collaborating with the larvae since the 1980s. Learn more about his work at Cabinet Magazine.”

Photos by Jean-Luc Fournier via Cabinet

[via Laughing Squid]

EyelashJewelry is an Etsy shop run by a woman named Natalie who handmakes, you guessed it, jewelry for your eyelashes:

Eyelash jewelry is made by hand-weaving tiny glass beads onto ultra thin wire. This creates a light-weight, flexible band that can be formed to the shape of any eye. Simply bend the jewelry into the proper shape, apply a thin layer of adhesive, and press it directly above your eyelashes.”

Here you see Unicorns, Candy Corn, wee bitty Baby Farm Animals, and ”Salad Days” (garden vegetables and feathers) eyelash adornments. Head over to EyelashJewelry to view many more.

[via Technabob]

Source technabob.com

Japanese design duo RGB (Shuji Tomishima and Takushi Okina) created an awesome series of rings that spell out onomatopoeic sound effects in katakana as they’re found in manga

"Katakana sound effects have long been a vital part of manga, with authors often using them lavishly throughout sequences to help heighten the visual mood of the story. It’s actually a really interesting topic of thought: designing typography based on the sound effect that each character has."

These striking rings are available through Mitsubai Tokyo. Prices range from smaller characters (ッ) which sell for 7,612 yen to larger characters (ド・ゴ・ハ・ガ) which sell for 23,100 yen.

[via Spoon & Tamago]