Art + Science = Awesome

Claudia Diaz is a professor at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia who has undertaken an unorthodox method of teaching her human anatomy classes. After teaching the course for over 20 years, she found the traditional routine of rote anatomical memorization boring for both her students and herself. 3 years ago Claudia began incorporating body painting into the course as a way to inspire and motivate her students. Fellow students are painted by their peers as though their skin has been removed to reveal the structures of their muscles, tendons, and bones.

Featured in these photographs is chiropractic student Zac O’Brien who patiently sat for around 18 hours while fellow students painted him. The finished result is what Diaz likes to call “anatomical man,” first brought to one of her classes in 2010.

”We walked him in and I still remember the looks on the kids’ faces. They were just in awe,” she said. ”I realised it shocked them, it inspired them and it motivated them.” Previously shy about taking off their clothes so classmates could study their bodies, the students began to shed their inhibitions through this painting exercise. ”I couldn’t get the kids to keep their clothes on. They were all throwing them off,” Dr Diaz said.

Visit Beautiful Decay to view more photos from Claudia Diaz’s unusual human anatomy class.

This tentacular video is further proof that science is awesome and so are the kids who appreciate it. 

This is what happens when you mix Mercury(II) thiocyanate (Hg(SCN)2) and Ammonium chromate (NH4)2CrO4 and then set it on fire. I was honestly expecting the fiery volcano part, but at about 30 seconds in something… horrifying happens. The kids witnessing the experiment really make the video. “The kraken!!!!” 

Science + Kraken-aware kids = Super Awesome

[via Colossal]

Science is awesome and this captivating video taught us about some seriously awesome science with some of the most mesmerizing high-speed video footage we’ve ever seen:

"Destin from Smarter Every Day stopped by Orbix Hot Glass in Fort Payne, Alabama to explore a fascinating phenomenon called a Prince Rupert’s Drop. Apparently when molten hot glass is dropped in cold water it forms an object that’s almost completely impervious to brute force, even a sold hammer strike to the center of the teardrop-like shape won’t break the glass. Yet gently cut or even bump the tip of the drop and suddenly the entire thing shatters in an explosive chain reaction traveling at a speed of over 1 mile PER SECOND. Watch the video above to see the effect in 130,000 fps glory.”

[via Colossal]

Have you ever wondered exactly how big the moon is? We love it when otherwise inconceivably large things are put into a comprehensible perspective. Redditor boredboarder8 wanted to better understand the size of the moon. Armed with the knowledge that “the greatest distance between two points within the contiguous U.S. is 2,892 miles (stretching from Point Arena, CA to West Quoddy Head, ME*)" and that the circumference of the Moon is 6,784 miles, boredboarder8 cleverly placed one measurement atop the other to create this rough approximation.

"It was difficult for me to fathom the size of the moon, thus inspiring the creation of this map. For me, this map puts the scale of the moon much smaller than I previously imagined. But it’s really interesting hearing how others (already grasping the size of the moon) now see the US as larger. 
It was one definitely a weird challenge to take a “flat” map of something on a sphere and project it onto a smaller sphere… Certainly take it only as an approximation, but what intrigued me the most is that the distance spanning the continental United States is roughly equal to a little less than half the circumference of the moon.”

So what do you think, does this awesome image make the moon seem larger or smaller than you thought? 
[via io9]

Have you ever wondered exactly how big the moon is? We love it when otherwise inconceivably large things are put into a comprehensible perspective. Redditor boredboarder8 wanted to better understand the size of the moon. Armed with the knowledge that “the greatest distance between two points within the contiguous U.S. is 2,892 miles (stretching from Point Arena, CA to West Quoddy Head, ME*)" and that the circumference of the Moon is 6,784 miles, boredboarder8 cleverly placed one measurement atop the other to create this rough approximation.

"It was difficult for me to fathom the size of the moon, thus inspiring the creation of this map. For me, this map puts the scale of the moon much smaller than I previously imagined. But it’s really interesting hearing how others (already grasping the size of the moon) now see the US as larger. 

It was one definitely a weird challenge to take a “flat” map of something on a sphere and project it onto a smaller sphere… Certainly take it only as an approximation, but what intrigued me the most is that the distance spanning the continental United States is roughly equal to a little less than half the circumference of the moon.”

So what do you think, does this awesome image make the moon seem larger or smaller than you thought? 

[via io9]

Gillian Higgins is a champion horseback rider who teaches horse anatomy to veterinary students, riders, and caretakers by painting the skeletal and muscular systems on the bodies of live horses. She uses water-based hypoallergenic paints and spends up to 4 hours painting a single horse.

“Painting the skeleton and musculature on the side of the horse really helps to bring the subject to life, she told the Daily Mail. “You can discover how to get the best out of your horse by seeing exactly what happens as it moves.”

The English horse-ring champion and sports remedial therapist got the idea for “Horses Inside Out” back in 2006 after completing a degree in equine business management. She understood why many riders and trainers were struggling to learn all those bones and muscles with incredibly long names, and started thinking about a way to better make them understand how the horse works.

Head over to Oddity Central  to learn more about Gillian’s awesome teaching program.

[via Oddity Central and Dailymail.co.uk]