This awesome Gundam mobile suit is made of stone, stands 13 feet tall, weighs 10 tons and might just be the most geekstastic headstone we’ve ever seen. It was photographed in front of a stonemasonry shop outside a Kise Sekizai Boseki Center in Yasu City, Shiga Prefecture, Japan.

Kise Sekizai is a chain of Japanese grave makers in the area. According to the watermark on Google Street View it was last seen in 2013 and probably still stands there to this day.

If your business is building tombstones and your population includes an ever-increasing number of anime-loving Otaku, it seems both shrewd and ambitious to advertise such extravagantly geeky custom grave markers. We love it.
[via RocketNews24]

This awesome Gundam mobile suit is made of stone, stands 13 feet tall, weighs 10 tons and might just be the most geekstastic headstone we’ve ever seen. It was photographed in front of a stonemasonry shop outside a Kise Sekizai Boseki Center in Yasu City, Shiga Prefecture, Japan.

Kise Sekizai is a chain of Japanese grave makers in the area. According to the watermark on Google Street View it was last seen in 2013 and probably still stands there to this day.

If your business is building tombstones and your population includes an ever-increasing number of anime-loving Otaku, it seems both shrewd and ambitious to advertise such extravagantly geeky custom grave markers. We love it.

[via RocketNews24]

This awesome skull was carved from an agate geode lined with amethyst crystals. It comes from Brazil, measures 7.6 inches long (from front to back), and weighs 8.3 pounds. Its presence may attract adventuresome fedora-wearing, bullwhip-carrying professors of archaeology to your door. So, if you decide to put it on your mantle, please do the honourable thing and make sure your home is free of snakes.

Click here for more photos.

[via Lost At E Minor]

Coins are already miniature works of art unto themselves. But Barcelona-based artist Paolo Curcio (aka “mrthe”) specializes in the art of creating hobo nickels (previously featured here) or bas relief sculptures carved into coins, which transform those tiny pieces of art into entirely new and arguably much more awesome artwork. His subjects vary from homages to pop culture figures, literary characters, and of course, the prevailing hobo nickel theme - skulls of all sorts.

"One aspect of Curcio’s process that’s really amazing is his ability to use coins made from multiple layers of metal (referred to as clad coins) which he then strategically reveals to create colored flourishes and background patterns.”

Visit Paolo Curcio’s website to view many more examples of his fascinating numismatic artwork. He even lists pieces for sale over on Ebay from time to time.

[via Colossal]

Hermit crabs require new, larger shells to accommodate their bodies as they grow. They’ve been known to salvage all sorts of hollow items besides actual shells to use as their new homes. American artist Josh Keyes (previously featured here) created this awesome painting, entitled Migratory Soul, which depicts a resourceful crab who found a human skull that appears to be a perfect fit. This painting will be shown at 111 Minna Gallery’s 20th anniversary group show opening September 6th, 2013 in San Francisco, CA.
[via Arrested Motion]
It’s Hermit Crab day on Geyser of Awesome!

Hermit crabs require new, larger shells to accommodate their bodies as they grow. They’ve been known to salvage all sorts of hollow items besides actual shells to use as their new homes. American artist Josh Keyes (previously featured here) created this awesome painting, entitled Migratory Soul, which depicts a resourceful crab who found a human skull that appears to be a perfect fit. This painting will be shown at 111 Minna Gallery’s 20th anniversary group show opening September 6th, 2013 in San Francisco, CA.

[via Arrested Motion]

It’s Hermit Crab day on Geyser of Awesome!

We’re fascinated by the history of Absinthe and the ritual and accoutrements involved in its consumption. One such item is the absinthe spoon. This awesome skeletal absinthe spoon was created by Crazy Pig Designs in London. The scroll woven between the bones of the hand features the slogan “Absinthe Perd Nos Fils” which means “Absinthe kills our sons.”
This beautiful and macabre utensil is available for purchase as a special order.
[via Neatorama]

We’re fascinated by the history of Absinthe and the ritual and accoutrements involved in its consumption. One such item is the absinthe spoon. This awesome skeletal absinthe spoon was created by Crazy Pig Designs in London. The scroll woven between the bones of the hand features the slogan “Absinthe Perd Nos Fils” which means “Absinthe kills our sons.”

This beautiful and macabre utensil is available for purchase as a special order.

[via Neatorama]

From the Department of Awesome Optical Illusions comes this fantastic photo entitled Oko, which means “eye” in Croatian. It was taken by Marko Popadic, a photographer based in Merzenich, Germany. The markings on the wing of a butterfly perched on the zygomatic bone of a human skull hauntingly serve as the piercing gaze of the skull’s missing eye.
[via Neatorama]

From the Department of Awesome Optical Illusions comes this fantastic photo entitled Oko, which means “eye” in Croatian. It was taken by Marko Popadic, a photographer based in Merzenich, Germany. The markings on the wing of a butterfly perched on the zygomatic bone of a human skull hauntingly serve as the piercing gaze of the skull’s missing eye.

[via Neatorama]

Do you remember the awesome knitted brain we posted about a few weeks ago? We may have just found the rest of the body.

Canadian artist Shanell Papp knitted this life-size reproduction of a dissected human corpse for an awesome and elaborate Lab installation that includes containers and displays for each of the internal organs. It’s the coziest gross anatomy class you’ve ever seen.

Shanell “has long been fascinated by death and the human body. This installation of a human body being dissected was an expression of that interest:

“To make the work, I borrowed a human skeleton from the university and collected anatomical textbooks. I also managed to track down a mortuary gurney for displaying the work–a mortuary gave me a gurney after a renovation…they were looking to get rid of it since “people are were getting too fat for the gurney.” I also worked in an old hospital turned history museum. I also went to open house day at a local funeral…they gave me a decorative pen. During my graduate studies, I was granted open access to the gross anatomy lab, though I was long finished making LAB/skeleton at this point. I was given access to draw, look around…. It is always funny how specimens are collected and cared for.”

Click here to read an interview with the artist and then head over to Shanell Papp’s website to view many more photos of her amazing Lab, the yarn corpse, and its organs.

[via Neatorama]

These haunting white sculptures appear to be completely solid, but they are actually incredibly delicate (completely awesome) objects made of thousands of layers of soft white paper, which makes them unbelievably flexible. They’re the work of Beijing artist Li Hongbo.

“A book editor and designer, the artist became fascinated by traditional Chinese toys and festive decorations known as paper gourds made from glued layers of thin paper which can be stored flat but then opened to reveal a flower or other shape. He applied the same honeycomb-like paper structure to much larger human forms resulting in these highly flexible sculptures. Hongbo recently had a solo show at Dominik Mersch Gallery in Australia… You can see much more of his work on their website.”

For an even better idea of just how amazing and bizarre Li Hongbo’s paper sculptures are, check out this video: Li Hongbo - Pure White Paper from the Dominik Mersch Gallery.

[via Juxtapoz and Colossal]