Everybody has a cheap relative and death can be expensive. You know when they die they’d be mad at you if you spent thousands of dollars on a fancy urn! That’s why we made our Modest Urn for the frugal. This metal can, which mysteriously resembles a coffee can, comes with a sticker sheet so you can customize it for the deceased. It’s 5” tall, 4” diameter and has a volume of 62.8 cubic inches. In addition, there’s a reusable interior metal seal and an exterior plastic cap to keep the ash from falling out. Includes a fill-in-the-blanks eulogy for easy mourning. Or get the pet version

Watch the video here

Buy one here

Source mcphee.com

Czech artist Monika Horčicová creates awesomely intricate and macabre sculptures of models of human bones that she fabricates using both cast polyester resin and 3D-printing.

The spectacular piece pictured at the top of this post was created in 2012 for Horčicová’s Bachelor thesis. Entitled Wheel of Life, it’s a 3D-printed sculpture made of 58 polyurethane resin legs and feet forming a wheel that depicts a “never-ending series of forward steps.”

Head over to Monika Horčicová ‘s website to check out more of her fantastically freaky skeletal sculptures.

[via Design Taxi]

Japanese artist and student Takayuki Hori created this awesome (and award-winning) series of eight translucent origami skeletal animals entitled Oritsunagumono, which translates to mean ‘things folded and connected’.

Printed on translucent paper, each piece represents an endangered species native to Japan’s coastal waterways and contains a foreign object inside their body - human-made detritus - representing the environmental threats faced by these animals. They are hauntingly beautiful memento mori for fragile wildlife struggling to cope in a hazardous ecosystem.

[via Beautiful/Decay, designboom and Colossal (visit all three for additional images)]

New Jersey-based Filipino artist Gregory Halili creates incredible bas-relief carvings of human skulls on the mother of pearl interior of gold-lip and black-lip oyster shells collected from his native Philippines. After the delicate hand carving process is complete he then paints them with oils.

Halili’s beautiful memento mori will be on exhibition soon at Silverlens Galleries in Manila and Nancy Hoffman Gallery in New York.

Click here for a mesmerizing process video. Visit Halili’s acebook page for additional images.

[via Colossal and Junkculture]

This awesome Gundam mobile suit is made of stone, stands 13 feet tall, weighs 10 tons and might just be the most geekstastic headstone we’ve ever seen. It was photographed in front of a stonemasonry shop outside a Kise Sekizai Boseki Center in Yasu City, Shiga Prefecture, Japan.

Kise Sekizai is a chain of Japanese grave makers in the area. According to the watermark on Google Street View it was last seen in 2013 and probably still stands there to this day.

If your business is building tombstones and your population includes an ever-increasing number of anime-loving Otaku, it seems both shrewd and ambitious to advertise such extravagantly geeky custom grave markers. We love it.
[via RocketNews24]

This awesome Gundam mobile suit is made of stone, stands 13 feet tall, weighs 10 tons and might just be the most geekstastic headstone we’ve ever seen. It was photographed in front of a stonemasonry shop outside a Kise Sekizai Boseki Center in Yasu City, Shiga Prefecture, Japan.

Kise Sekizai is a chain of Japanese grave makers in the area. According to the watermark on Google Street View it was last seen in 2013 and probably still stands there to this day.

If your business is building tombstones and your population includes an ever-increasing number of anime-loving Otaku, it seems both shrewd and ambitious to advertise such extravagantly geeky custom grave markers. We love it.

[via RocketNews24]

This awesome skull was carved from an agate geode lined with amethyst crystals. It comes from Brazil, measures 7.6 inches long (from front to back), and weighs 8.3 pounds. Its presence may attract adventuresome fedora-wearing, bullwhip-carrying professors of archaeology to your door. So, if you decide to put it on your mantle, please do the honourable thing and make sure your home is free of snakes.

Click here for more photos.

[via Lost At E Minor]

Coins are already miniature works of art unto themselves. But Barcelona-based artist Paolo Curcio (aka “mrthe”) specializes in the art of creating hobo nickels (previously featured here) or bas relief sculptures carved into coins, which transform those tiny pieces of art into entirely new and arguably much more awesome artwork. His subjects vary from homages to pop culture figures, literary characters, and of course, the prevailing hobo nickel theme - skulls of all sorts.

"One aspect of Curcio’s process that’s really amazing is his ability to use coins made from multiple layers of metal (referred to as clad coins) which he then strategically reveals to create colored flourishes and background patterns.”

Visit Paolo Curcio’s website to view many more examples of his fascinating numismatic artwork. He even lists pieces for sale over on Ebay from time to time.

[via Colossal]

Hermit crabs require new, larger shells to accommodate their bodies as they grow. They’ve been known to salvage all sorts of hollow items besides actual shells to use as their new homes. American artist Josh Keyes (previously featured here) created this awesome painting, entitled Migratory Soul, which depicts a resourceful crab who found a human skull that appears to be a perfect fit. This painting will be shown at 111 Minna Gallery’s 20th anniversary group show opening September 6th, 2013 in San Francisco, CA.
[via Arrested Motion]
It’s Hermit Crab day on Geyser of Awesome!

Hermit crabs require new, larger shells to accommodate their bodies as they grow. They’ve been known to salvage all sorts of hollow items besides actual shells to use as their new homes. American artist Josh Keyes (previously featured here) created this awesome painting, entitled Migratory Soul, which depicts a resourceful crab who found a human skull that appears to be a perfect fit. This painting will be shown at 111 Minna Gallery’s 20th anniversary group show opening September 6th, 2013 in San Francisco, CA.

[via Arrested Motion]

It’s Hermit Crab day on Geyser of Awesome!

We’re fascinated by the history of Absinthe and the ritual and accoutrements involved in its consumption. One such item is the absinthe spoon. This awesome skeletal absinthe spoon was created by Crazy Pig Designs in London. The scroll woven between the bones of the hand features the slogan “Absinthe Perd Nos Fils” which means “Absinthe kills our sons.”
This beautiful and macabre utensil is available for purchase as a special order.
[via Neatorama]

We’re fascinated by the history of Absinthe and the ritual and accoutrements involved in its consumption. One such item is the absinthe spoon. This awesome skeletal absinthe spoon was created by Crazy Pig Designs in London. The scroll woven between the bones of the hand features the slogan “Absinthe Perd Nos Fils” which means “Absinthe kills our sons.”

This beautiful and macabre utensil is available for purchase as a special order.

[via Neatorama]