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24 posts tagged Mosaic

The beautiful woodpile mosaic owls are the work of Gary Tallman, an 82-year-old Montana resident who turns the chore of stacking firewood into an art form. Over the years Tallman has learned the many colors found in various types of cordwood and uses them as his palette.

“Everybody doesn’t notice how many tones in the wood there are,” Marilyn Tallman said of her husband’s eye for the subtleties of wood. “He sees beauty in all kinds of things.”

“Generally speaking, we can find almost all the colors and tones in the woods that we harvest,” Tallman said of his woodpile mosaic. “Except for black,” he confessed. “We don’t have any ebony around here so I do color the ends of some of the black ones. But the others are pretty much just the way they come out of nature.”

Tallman’s ongoing owl theme is based on the birds who live in the trees around his home in Montana’s Little Belt Mountains. Each piece begins with a sketch drawn on graph paper. After first chopping and splitting the wood, Tallman sorts the various hues into separate piles. Then the process of stacking begins. He estimates that it takes him about 20 hours to stack one of his mosaics.

Click here to learn more about Gary Tallman and his firewood mosaics.

[via Bored Panda and the Great Falls Tribune]

Kevin Champeny
School of Transcendence
42 Kevin Champeny
School of Transcendence
42 Kevin Champeny
School of Transcendence
42 Kevin Champeny
School of Transcendence
42 Kevin Champeny
School of Transcendence
42 Kevin Champeny
School of Transcendence
42 Kevin Champeny
School of Transcendence
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Artist Kevin Champeny (previously featured here) just completed an awesome new, spectacularly detailed mosaic entitled School of Transcendence. This beautiful koi and the water through which it’s swimming are made of 25,000 hand cast resin fish. That’s a lot of tiny fish.

The finished piece measures 42” x 60” x 1.5”. The longer we look at it, the more we keep expecting this dazzling school of fish to suddenly burst apart as each tiny fish swims away.

[via kchampeny]

Reblogged from kchampeny

New York City-based artist James Haggerty creates incredibly intricate mosaic portraits of Star Wars characters using tens of thousands of multi-colored staples punched into painted boards. Haggerty’s Darth Vader piece, entitled The Side, measures 40” x 32” and is made of 10,496 staples (7,696 silver and 2,800 red). Greedo’s unmistakable green mug is made of 21,458 staples and it took 33,580 staples to create C-3PO’s worried face.

Visit James Haggerty’s Facebook page for additional images of his geektastic artwork.

[via Laughing Squid]

Earth Day is next Tuesday, April 22nd and the the folks at NASA are celebrating with an awesome #GlobalSelfie event and you can be part of it.

They’re going to compile a massive mosaic of self-portraits using selfies shot on April 22nd and posted to Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Google+ and Flickr that include the hashtag #GlobalSelfie. Participants also need to include their location in their photo, so NASA has created a handy little sign you can print, fill out and use in your selfie (see second image).

Visit the #GlobalSelfie website for more details and a full-resolution version of the location ID sign, which they’ve made available in over a dozen languages.

Photo via Archie McPhee on Instagram

[via Geekologie]

This awesome pixelated portrait of Harrison Ford as Han Solo (shooting first) in Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope was spotted by Skels from Geek Crafts at the April 2013 Sydney Brick Show. Unfortunately we don’t know the name of the artist responsible for this impressively geeky work of art, but we do know that they used more than 20,000 LEGO “one-er” bricks to create it.

[via Technabob]

This awesome work of LEGO and gaming geekery is a 75” x 45” mosaic made of 10,511 LEGO bricks featuring a vast array (nearly 24 square feet) of characters from classic Nintendo and Sega arcade games.

Click here to view a hi-res image of this incredible LEGO mosaic.

This geektastic masterpiece was created by an artist in the UK named Franck Lahaye who has put his handiwork up for sale on Etsy, saying, “All profits will go toward my friend’s school project, she is raising money to send her class to Africa next year.”

[via Technabob]

In 1998 American conservationist photographer James Balog undertook a six-year-long quest to photograph the largest, oldest, and strongest trees in North America. James began his project by setting up enormous portrait studios beneath the canopies of the forests he was visiting. But it didn’t take long for him to realize that his tree subjects were so incredibly large that a whole new method was necessary to photograph them properly:

"He devised a multi-frame approach of photographing the trees from the top down. The method was inspired by some of the lunar landing pictures from the NASA missions during the 1960s. Balog climbed each tree, and then meticulously photographed it in sections as he rappelled downward. Later, he created digital mosaics by stitching the images together using computer imaging software. Some images required up to four days of shooting, plus as many as six weeks of computer work to assemble the final composition."

His resulting photo series, published under the title Tree: A New Vision of the American Forest, is a beautiful and impressive achievement that helps give us a sense of just how awesome these trees are.

The two trees pictured here are: “Stratosphere Giant”, a Coast Redwood in Humboldt Redwoods State Park, CA. Standing 369.7 feet tall, it is the tallest tree on earth. The second tree is “Stagg,” a Sequoia located in Alder Creek Grove in Giant Sequoia National Monument, also in California. It is the fifth largest tree in the world. Look closely at these two mosaics and you’ll notice human figures climbings the trees, which emphasizes just how gigantic these trees are.

"These images stand as an artistic and symbolic reassembling of the continent’s long-lost primeval forests. Across the globe, the planet’s original tree cover has been altered so dramatically that we no longer remember what made nature natural."

Visit James Balog’s website to view more of his awe-inspiring environmental photography, including more photos from Tree: A New Vision of the American Forest.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

Inspired by the lavish HBO movie Behind the Candelabra, San Francisco-based mosaic portrait artist Jason Mecier (previously featured here) created this awesome edible portrait of Michael Douglas as Liberace.
Jason spent over 40 hours and used more than 4000 Mike & Ike candies to creating this fabulous mosaic. We can’t help but wonder how many pieces of candy he ate during those 40 hours. Had it been us, we would’ve have a hard time not eating all of our art supplies.
[via Laughing Squid]

Inspired by the lavish HBO movie Behind the Candelabra, San Francisco-based mosaic portrait artist Jason Mecier (previously featured here) created this awesome edible portrait of Michael Douglas as Liberace.

Jason spent over 40 hours and used more than 4000 Mike & Ike candies to creating this fabulous mosaic. We can’t help but wonder how many pieces of candy he ate during those 40 hours. Had it been us, we would’ve have a hard time not eating all of our art supplies.

[via Laughing Squid]

Miami-based artist Federico Uribe used thousands of parts from discarded computers, such as cables, fans, keyboard keys, motherboards, and mice, to create this awesomely intricate piece entitled Tapete (Carpet). It’s probably not a comfortable space upon which to stretch out and take a nap, but it sure is amazing to behold. 

Photos by Pipe Yanguas

[via Colossal]