Tag Results

20 posts tagged Mosaic

This awesome pixelated portrait of Harrison Ford as Han Solo (shooting first) in Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope was spotted by Skels from Geek Crafts at the April 2013 Sydney Brick Show. Unfortunately we don’t know the name of the artist responsible for this impressively geeky work of art, but we do know that they used more than 20,000 LEGO “one-er” bricks to create it.

[via Technabob]

This awesome work of LEGO and gaming geekery is a 75” x 45” mosaic made of 10,511 LEGO bricks featuring a vast array (nearly 24 square feet) of characters from classic Nintendo and Sega arcade games.

Click here to view a hi-res image of this incredible LEGO mosaic.

This geektastic masterpiece was created by an artist in the UK named Franck Lahaye who has put his handiwork up for sale on Etsy, saying, “All profits will go toward my friend’s school project, she is raising money to send her class to Africa next year.”

[via Technabob]

In 1998 American conservationist photographer James Balog undertook a six-year-long quest to photograph the largest, oldest, and strongest trees in North America. James began his project by setting up enormous portrait studios beneath the canopies of the forests he was visiting. But it didn’t take long for him to realize that his tree subjects were so incredibly large that a whole new method was necessary to photograph them properly:

"He devised a multi-frame approach of photographing the trees from the top down. The method was inspired by some of the lunar landing pictures from the NASA missions during the 1960s. Balog climbed each tree, and then meticulously photographed it in sections as he rappelled downward. Later, he created digital mosaics by stitching the images together using computer imaging software. Some images required up to four days of shooting, plus as many as six weeks of computer work to assemble the final composition."

His resulting photo series, published under the title Tree: A New Vision of the American Forest, is a beautiful and impressive achievement that helps give us a sense of just how awesome these trees are.

The two trees pictured here are: “Stratosphere Giant”, a Coast Redwood in Humboldt Redwoods State Park, CA. Standing 369.7 feet tall, it is the tallest tree on earth. The second tree is “Stagg,” a Sequoia located in Alder Creek Grove in Giant Sequoia National Monument, also in California. It is the fifth largest tree in the world. Look closely at these two mosaics and you’ll notice human figures climbings the trees, which emphasizes just how gigantic these trees are.

"These images stand as an artistic and symbolic reassembling of the continent’s long-lost primeval forests. Across the globe, the planet’s original tree cover has been altered so dramatically that we no longer remember what made nature natural."

Visit James Balog’s website to view more of his awe-inspiring environmental photography, including more photos from Tree: A New Vision of the American Forest.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

Inspired by the lavish HBO movie Behind the Candelabra, San Francisco-based mosaic portrait artist Jason Mecier (previously featured here) created this awesome edible portrait of Michael Douglas as Liberace.
Jason spent over 40 hours and used more than 4000 Mike & Ike candies to creating this fabulous mosaic. We can’t help but wonder how many pieces of candy he ate during those 40 hours. Had it been us, we would’ve have a hard time not eating all of our art supplies.
[via Laughing Squid]

Inspired by the lavish HBO movie Behind the Candelabra, San Francisco-based mosaic portrait artist Jason Mecier (previously featured here) created this awesome edible portrait of Michael Douglas as Liberace.

Jason spent over 40 hours and used more than 4000 Mike & Ike candies to creating this fabulous mosaic. We can’t help but wonder how many pieces of candy he ate during those 40 hours. Had it been us, we would’ve have a hard time not eating all of our art supplies.

[via Laughing Squid]

Miami-based artist Federico Uribe used thousands of parts from discarded computers, such as cables, fans, keyboard keys, motherboards, and mice, to create this awesomely intricate piece entitled Tapete (Carpet). It’s probably not a comfortable space upon which to stretch out and take a nap, but it sure is amazing to behold. 

Photos by Pipe Yanguas

[via Colossal]

Toronto-based collective Cube Works Studio have made a name for themselves using Rubik’s cubes to create inspiring works of art. “In the past few years, the small Toronto-based collaborative set two unique Guinness World Records by creating the world’s largest Rubik’s Cube mosaics, first The Last Supper (+4,000 cubes) in 2010 and then The Hand of God (+12,000 cubes) in 2011.”

That’s very impressive, but Cube Works Studio just broke all their old records with the construction of an awesome new mural, the Macau Mural, which measures over 13 feet high and 200 feet wide. The collective used an amazing 85,794 Rubik’s Cubes to create a mural depicting the skyline of Macau, China that was installated at the Macau waterfront.

Creative Director Josh Chalom says, “Our works are meant to inspire, unite and invoke a sense of nostalgia by using common, tangible objects and methods to create impressive and entertaining works of art that can be appreciated and enjoyed by all.”

Click here to watch a great time-lapse video of the installation of the Macau Mural.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

From the Department of Awesome Inevitabilities comes a portrait of actor Kevin Bacon made out of, yes, bacon. Mosaic artist Jason Mecier used 15 pounds of bacon to create this portrait:


"I used burnt bacon for the shading and uncooked fatty bits for the light tones on his face. I thought I had too much bacon when I bought a 10lb bag, but I realised Kevin’s head would need much more."


[via Telegraph.co.uk]

From the Department of Awesome Inevitabilities comes a portrait of actor Kevin Bacon made out of, yes, bacon. Mosaic artist Jason Mecier used 15 pounds of bacon to create this portrait:

"I used burnt bacon for the shading and uncooked fatty bits for the light tones on his face. I thought I had too much bacon when I bought a 10lb bag, but I realised Kevin’s head would need much more."

[via Telegraph.co.uk]

French artist Bernard Pras uses found objects, all sorts of discarded materials and everyday junk, to create his large-scale, incredibly detailed works of art, some of which recreate well known images from popular culture and the fine art world.

The visual construction of his “paintings” bears a resemblance to that of artist Vik Muniz’s junkyard masterpieces and shredded magazine collages. Like Muniz, Pras focuses on classic works and the artists behind said creations. The result of his valiant efforts in compiling each of his subjects is an enormous sculptural portrait composed of random yet carefully placed loose objects.

In producing his inspired installations, Pras takes cues from Giuseppe Arcimboldo, an Italian painter from the 16th century who’s most famous for his portrait paintings featuring an amalgam of fruits, vegetables, flowers, and other unorthodox components. He has even assembled a three-dimensional version of one of Arcimboldo’s paintings with actual produce. The artist also tackles the timeless works of other great painters like Dalí, Munch, and Hiroshige.

These awesomely detailed installations offer two different points of gratification. First you see the portraits themselves. Then your eyes begin to wander as you start to take in the myriad objects that have been so carefully positioned to create those portraits. It’s clearly painstaking work.

Visit My Modern Metropolis to view more of Bernard Pras' amazing artwork.

Far away in an isolated Russian village called Kamarchaga, located in the Siberian Taiga, lives a creative and dedicated pensioner named Olga Kostina who has meticulously decorated the exterior of her home with 30,000 plastic bottle caps.

Olga collected the bottle caps over the course of many years and only began to hammer them into place once she felt she had accumulated enough. Clearly this is a person with tremendous patience. The bottle caps have been carefully arranged into colourful, detailed mosaics depicting traditional macrame motifs and local woodland creatures. Each bottle cap has been hammered into place by Olga herself. It comes as no surprise to learn that her awesome home has since become something of a local landmark.

Photos by Ilya Naymushin

[via Designboom]