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8 posts tagged Muscles

Here’s further proof that anyone can (and should) cosplay their hearts out. Seattle-based photographer David “DTJAAAAM” Ngo took this awesome portrait during the recent 2014 Emerald City Comicon:

"Olive Oyl and Popeye prove that it’s okay to cosplay at any age."

Click here to check out more of DTJAAAAM’s ECCC cosplay portraits.
[via Super Punch]

Here’s further proof that anyone can (and should) cosplay their hearts out. Seattle-based photographer David “DTJAAAAM” Ngo took this awesome portrait during the recent 2014 Emerald City Comicon:

"Olive Oyl and Popeye prove that it’s okay to cosplay at any age."

Click here to check out more of DTJAAAAM’s ECCC cosplay portraits.

[via Super Punch]

A redditor named j0be recently shared this awesome pair of “then and now” photos in which a life-long fan of wrestling legend Hulk Hogan poses with his idol. He first appears as a kid and then, years later, he managed to recreate the same photo, grinning while caught in muscle-flexing clutches of his hero all over again.
We don’t know who this happy Hulkamania fan is (If you do please let us know), but the smile on his face in both shots pretty much says it all.
[via Twisted Sifter]

A redditor named j0be recently shared this awesome pair of “then and now” photos in which a life-long fan of wrestling legend Hulk Hogan poses with his idol. He first appears as a kid and then, years later, he managed to recreate the same photo, grinning while caught in muscle-flexing clutches of his hero all over again.

We don’t know who this happy Hulkamania fan is (If you do please let us know), but the smile on his face in both shots pretty much says it all.

[via Twisted Sifter]

Japanese artist Masao Kinoshita creates awesome painted fiberglass anatomical sculptures depicting subjects who have no skin. Some of the most impressive examples of his work depict deities such as Ganesha or the Yoga Asura. Their stylized musculature and skeletons are beautifully posed and incredibly detailed.

We already thought Kewpie Dolls were wonderfully creepy things, but Kinoshita’s version, entitled Q, takes that inherent creepiness to a whole new level.

Visit Masao Kinoshita’s website to view more of his fascinating sculptures.

[via Nerdcore]

Art + Science = Awesome

Claudia Diaz is a professor at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia who has undertaken an unorthodox method of teaching her human anatomy classes. After teaching the course for over 20 years, she found the traditional routine of rote anatomical memorization boring for both her students and herself. 3 years ago Claudia began incorporating body painting into the course as a way to inspire and motivate her students. Fellow students are painted by their peers as though their skin has been removed to reveal the structures of their muscles, tendons, and bones.

Featured in these photographs is chiropractic student Zac O’Brien who patiently sat for around 18 hours while fellow students painted him. The finished result is what Diaz likes to call “anatomical man,” first brought to one of her classes in 2010.

”We walked him in and I still remember the looks on the kids’ faces. They were just in awe,” she said. ”I realised it shocked them, it inspired them and it motivated them.” Previously shy about taking off their clothes so classmates could study their bodies, the students began to shed their inhibitions through this painting exercise. ”I couldn’t get the kids to keep their clothes on. They were all throwing them off,” Dr Diaz said.

Visit Beautiful Decay to view more photos from Claudia Diaz’s unusual human anatomy class.

Gillian Higgins is a champion horseback rider who teaches horse anatomy to veterinary students, riders, and caretakers by painting the skeletal and muscular systems on the bodies of live horses. She uses water-based hypoallergenic paints and spends up to 4 hours painting a single horse.

“Painting the skeleton and musculature on the side of the horse really helps to bring the subject to life, she told the Daily Mail. “You can discover how to get the best out of your horse by seeing exactly what happens as it moves.”

The English horse-ring champion and sports remedial therapist got the idea for “Horses Inside Out” back in 2006 after completing a degree in equine business management. She understood why many riders and trainers were struggling to learn all those bones and muscles with incredibly long names, and started thinking about a way to better make them understand how the horse works.

Head over to Oddity Central  to learn more about Gillian’s awesome teaching program.

[via Oddity Central and Dailymail.co.uk]

While an awful lot of work goes into the design and production of US currency, many people feel that it’s not nearly as interesting or exciting as the money produced by other countries. As a possible replacement for his rather staid portrait on the US five dollar bill, artist Tim Shumate (aka telegrafixs) reimagines a buff, tough, pierced and tattooed (but still quite solemn and pensive) version of Abraham Lincoln in this awesome pencil drawing entitled I Got $5 On It.
This piece is available as a print here and as a t-shirt here.
[via 22 Words]

While an awful lot of work goes into the design and production of US currency, many people feel that it’s not nearly as interesting or exciting as the money produced by other countries. As a possible replacement for his rather staid portrait on the US five dollar bill, artist Tim Shumate (aka telegrafixs) reimagines a buff, tough, pierced and tattooed (but still quite solemn and pensive) version of Abraham Lincoln in this awesome pencil drawing entitled I Got $5 On It.

This piece is available as a print here and as a t-shirt here.

[via 22 Words]

“Animals Inside Out” is an exhibition of animal corpses that have been perfectly preserved with plastic polymers in a process called “plastination” (video). The exhibition is by plastination inventor Dr. Gunther von Hagen. Von Hagen is best known for his Body Worlds exhibitions of plastinated human cadavers. “Animals Inside Out” is on display at the Natural History Museum in London through September 16, 2012. To see more photos of the exhibition, see this gallery by The Guardian.

Visit Laughing Squid to view more photos and a video from “Animals Inside Out”.

Source Laughing Squid