Tag Results

90 posts tagged Octopus

America’s vice presidents have never looked so awesome. These tentacular ink and watercolor portraits are the work of Los Angeles-based artist and writer Jonathan Crow. His ongoing Veeptopus series depicts each US vice president with an octopus hanging out on his head (although he made a slight, yet somehow very appropriate, exception for Dick Cheney).

The portraits often accompanied by interesting historical tidbits and sometimes Crow deviates from straight cephalopod-VP portraiture to create wonderfully weird(er) pieces such as President Taft riding a badger.

Prints of the Veeptopus series are available via Jonathan Crow’s Etsy shop.

[via io9]

Belgium-based street artist ROA (previously featured here) recently spent some time in Djerba, Tunisia where he participated in the Djerbahood project, an open-air museum project featuring the work of hundreds of artists from thirty different nationalities, all organized by Galerie Itinerrance. ROA made wonderful use of the city’s numerous domed buildings to create fantastic creatures in his signature monochromatic style.

Visit the Djerbahood website to check out many more pieces from this awesome project.

[via StreetArtNews]

Today the Department of Awesome Parenting salutes this deep sea cephalopod supermom who spent four years and five months vigilantly guarding her brood of eggs until they hatched. This 53 month period is double the longest known brooding time ever seen in the animal kingdom.

The discovery, published in the journal PLOS One, was made in a canyon 1.4km beneath the Pacific, off California. Dr Bruce Robison led the research at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). He told BBC News his team had stumbled upon the plucky mother in the days before she settled down and glued her eggs to the rock face. She was heading, slowly, for a known brooding site.

Characteristic scars on the octopus enabled the team to identify her one month later when they spotted her a second time, now with a new clutch of eggs.

"The first time that we dropped back down… and realised that she had gone up and laid a clutch of eggs, it was very exciting," Dr Robison said. "We knew that we had the beginning. No-one had ever had the good fortune to come upon the beginning of a brooding period."

The team paid 18 additional visits over a 4.5 year period to check on the devoted mama octopus using their robotic submarine. Once a female octopus has laid her eggs, she spends the rest of her life protecting them. She doesn’t eat during this period, which means she slowly weakens as her eggs develop. Shortly after the eggs hatch, her magnum opus completed, she dies.

When Dr Robison’s team visited the site for what would be the last time, they found only empty egg cases. The brood had successfully hatched and their faithful mum had gone. Take a moment to think back over all the last 4.5 years of your life and consider that during that entire period this incredible mama octopus was doing one awesome thing.

Head over to BBC News to learn more.

[via BBC News and PLOS One]

These tentacular Octopus and Giant Squid tables are the work of San Francisco-based bronze sculptor Kirk McGuire. The beautiful bronze cephalopods are so lifelike, we wouldn’t be surprised if you felt phantom tentacles tickling your ankles while sitting at either of these tables.

Visit Kirk McGuire’s website to check out his standalone bronze sculptures and more of his awesome undersea animal tables.

[via Neatorama]

This tentacular octopus hairpiece is the work of Australian artist Kirstie Williams (deviantARTist Deeed), who created it as part of a magnificent costume for a steampunk ball she recently attended. Williams documented each step of the elaborate creation process, which involved sculpting a foam core, covering it in long artificial hair wefts and then enhancing it with copper-colored paint and a few obligatory brass gears. The hirsute cephalopod was then attached to an Arda Candy Striper wig. As you can see, the result of all her effort is nothing short of spectacular.

Williams is currently auctioning off a commission for one customized octopus hairpiece just like the one seen here. The auction ends June 15, 2014. Click here for details.

Top three photos by Gillian B Dragancaor.

[via Nerdcore and Fashionably Geek]

Octopuses of the Night from Dustin Adamson on Vimeo.

The octopus is an awesome and astonishingly intelligent animal. This beautiful underwater video, shot by of OceanShutter.com, gives us the opportunity to take an exceptionally close look at a few of our tentacular friends.

Entitled “Octopuses of the Night”, the video was shot during night dives that Adamson made in the Philippines. He was able to film these remarkable creatures in such fine detail that we’re able to really appreciate the texture of their skin, their awesome tentacles, amazing eyes and how they tuck themselves into cozy beds made of seashells.

Goodnight little octopus. Sleep tight.

[via The Presurfer]

We’re already huge fans of the indescribably awesome octopus, but that doesn’t mean we aren’t always ready to be astonished by them all over again. This amazing video shows an octopus freeing itself from a closed jar by twisting off the lid from the inside. It was originally posted to the YouTube account of the Enoshima Aquarium, which is located in the city of Fujisawa in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan.

Further proof that octopodes rule.

[via Incredible Things]

The Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders would like to welcome these incredibly tiny, ridiculously cute Caribbean pygmy octopus (Octopus mercatoris) hatchlings, born last month at the Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium in Sarasota, Florida.

Can you believe how small they are? Look at all those wee-bitty suckers on their eensy-weensy tentacles. When they’re full grown, these tentacular cuties will only be about the size of a silver dollar. The cuteness, it hurts!

Photos by the Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium

[via ZooBorns]

This gorgeous, tentacular object is an American chatelaine dating back to 1887. A chatelaine is a decorative belt hook or clasp worn at the waist with a series of chains suspended from it. They were worn by many housekeepers during the 19th century, with each tentacle chain fastened to a useful household appendage such as scissors, thimble, watch, key, vinaigrette, household seal, etc.
This stunning sterling silver octopus chatelaine was made by the Gorham Manufacturing Company and is part of the jewelry collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
[via Retronaut]

This gorgeous, tentacular object is an American chatelaine dating back to 1887. A chatelaine is a decorative belt hook or clasp worn at the waist with a series of chains suspended from it. They were worn by many housekeepers during the 19th century, with each tentacle chain fastened to a useful household appendage such as scissors, thimble, watch, key, vinaigrette, household seal, etc.

This stunning sterling silver octopus chatelaine was made by the Gorham Manufacturing Company and is part of the jewelry collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

[via Retronaut]