Toronto, Ontario-based artist Ruth Oosterman collaborates with her two-year-old daughter Eve to create imaginative paintings that feel as though they’ve been lifted from the pages of a fantastic series of storybooks we’re now dying to read. Here Oosterman describe their process:

As all of our collaborations start, my two year old creates her own sketch with an ink pen which I then use to turn into a watercolor painting. The sketch is completely her own with no instruction given from me, I simply use her creativity to inspire me to create a painting.

Oosterman says that she can usually either discern a picture hidden inside Eve’s sketch or her daughter will have chatted with her about what she was drawing. But sometimes there is no conteext andshe has to let her own imagination run with it.

I try to work quickly and let imagination and play take root into the painting rather than taking it to seriously, this way I can encourage Eve’s contribution without making it to “grownup.”

Visit Ruth Oosterman’s blog and her YouTube channel to check out more of her wonderful collaborations with young Eve.

Prints of some of their creations are available via the Eve’s Imagination Etsy shop.

[via Bored Panda]

Twin Brazilian street artists Otavio and Gustavo Pandolfo, collectively known as Os Gêmeos (previously featured here), just completed this awesomely huge, vibrant and detailed piece covering six towering silos on Granville island in Vancouver, Canada for the Vancouver Biennale. These massive Giants are the brothers’ largest work to date.They spent three months painting the 75-foot-tall industrial towers in their distinctive colorful style, full of smaller hidden characters. A successful Indiegogo fundraising campaign helped the brothers cover the expenses needed to complete this non-profit public art project.

The twins spent the final days adding numerous details to their characters – pockets, stitches, buttons, shoes, fabric patterns, all by using lots of bright colors and by painting more and more signature yellow faces. Using the architecture of the silos, the giants are all kneeling with four of them facing one way, and the other two facing the other way, giving the finished work a full 360 degree identity.

Visit StreetArtNews and Arrested Motion for additional images of this amazing installation.

"The world is so full of a number of things,
I’m sure we should all be as happy as kings.”

Because who doesn’t love anthropomorphic food and animal friends? Our friend and awesome artist Cuddly Rigor Mortis (previously featured here) just opened a solo exhibition of new paintings, entitled Happy As Kings, at Gallery Nucleus. The show runs through September 21, 2014.

Inspired by the Robert Louis Stevenson poem, “Happy Thought”, the artist introduces us to a group of gleeful royals that find happiness in the ordinary yet wonderful things in life.

Don’t worry if you can’t make it down in person, click here to view the exhibition online and even purchase originals and prints.

[via Super Punch]

German artist Gesine Marwedel (previously featured here) views bodypainting as a transformative, and sometimes even therapeutic art form. She excels at using the human form to create the convincing illusion that you’re looking at lifelike animals, plants and abstract - sometimes truly startling - works of art. Marwedel’s models are more than live canvases that she paints for her own artistic purposes, they’re also people interested in expressing themselves by transforming into something else, if only for a little while.

Visit Gesine Marwede’s website to explore more of her breathtaking bodypainting.

[via Demilked]

Spanish street artist Pejac (previously featured here) isn’t content with using details as inspiration for enhancing the urban landscape. He’s also used the windows inside his own home to create playful works of art, including a recent tribute to the 40th anniversary of French high-wire artist Philippe Petit’s legendary walk between the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City.

"Back in 2011, when he was living in Valencia, surrounded by surveillance cameras and without curtains to protect his privacy, Pejac started experimenting with paper and acrylic works on glass. He shared a couple of these earlier works with us, photographed by Paco Esteve. Feeling exposed and trapped inside his home, he started creating these as a way of fighting this lack of privacy. By using the view from his house as a backdrop for these miniature works, he created little urban art pieces in privacy of his living room."

Head over to Hi-Fructose for additional process photos.

[via Hi-Fructose]

It’s been a while since we last checked in on the amazing work of real-life invisible man, Chinese artist Liu Bolin, master of creative camouflage (previously featured here).

If you aren’t already familiar with Liu Bolin's awesome artwork, you should know that there are no post-production tricks used to create these images. The artist is able to seamlessly blend into all sorts of urban environments and busy background scenes thanks to a team of skilled assistants who painstakingly reference photos of the space in which Bolin is standing as they paint him from head-to-toe so that he seems to disappear completely, no matter what that background might be.

Bolin has an exhibition of new work, entitled Liu Bolin: A Colorful World, opening at the Klein Sun Gallery in New York on September 11th and running through november 1, 2014.

Visit designboom for additional images.

Louisville, Kentucky-based artist Tom Pfannerstill creates amazing works of art that look like trash, and not just any trash, but actual pieces of litter that he actually found and picked up. For an ongoing series entitled From the Street, Pfannerstill uses the trompe l’oeil technique to paint flat pieces of wood so that they become uncanny likenesses of discarded objects and disposable containers, everything from a smashed boxes of Animal Crackers and Cracker Jack to a beat-up old baseball cap.

"…he starts off by choosing a real piece of trash and traces the outline of the object onto a flat piece of wood. Once his wooden canvas is ready, he fills it in with acrylic paints, in painstaking detail. The two-dimensional painting soon comes to life, looking exactly like a piece of trash it was modeled after."

So why paint depictions of trash? We’re glad you asked. Pfannerstill views each object he finds as something mass-produced that’s become utterly unique as it has been altered by time and exposure to the elements. No two pieces of litter are the same.

“The sparkling clean surfaces are smudged and marked by everyday dirt, grit and grime. No two objects have exactly the same journey.”

Pfannerstill also regards these piece of urban detritus as future artifacts:

“As time inevitably marches on and everything, trash included continues to change, my little pieces ‘from the street’ will become increasingly ‘of a time’. As the popularity of products ebb and flow and certain products disappear altogether as wants, needs and lifestyles change, the will become increasingly esoteric.”

Visit Tom Pfannerstill’s website to check out more of his artwork, including more pieces from his From the Street series.

[via Oddity Central]

We’ve all become locked into staring contests with these awesome paintings by Taiwanese artist Chang Chia-Ying. Really, we can’t look away.

"Her Russian doll-like portraits of animals and chubby children stare into the distance with hollow, glazed over expressions on their faces. Likewise, the viewer is invited to look through them; their torsos are a window into an alternate reality. They are surrounded by mysterious fairytale gardens, inspired by the cartoons Chia-Ying watched as a child."

Less talk, more staring contests with mesmerizing painted monkeys! You may need to come help us look away or at least bring over some snacks and join in. If enough of us stare back at these beguiling characters, one of them is sure to blink soon. Right?

Visit Chang Chia-Ying’s website to check out more of her dreamy, hypnotic paintings.

[via Hi-Fructose]

Spanish street artist Pejac (previously featured here), skilled at making use of the urban landscape, recently paid a visit to Paris where he cleverly transformed a long crack in a wall into a wavy, dreamlike door, ever so slightly ajar. We can’t guarantee that it’s a gateway to Narnia, but - if you can get it open - we suspect this door leads somewhere awesome.

Visit Pejac’s website to check out more of his fantastic street art interventions.

[via StreetArtNews]

A few months ago we shared some of S. Morita’s photos of Japan’s beautifully decorated manhole covers. In Japan there’s an official Society of Manhole Covers and this sort of urban beautification is a municipal responsibility. Today we learned that even though China has no such system in place, a 24-year-old art graduate named Hu Yifan is taking it upon himself to decorate the manhole covers in his neighborhood. So far Yifan has painted over 30 manhole covers in the Xiaodian district of Taiyuan, capital of Northwest China’s Shanxi province. Sometimes he simply paints a fun, colorful image on the cover, while other times he uses the covers to create larger pieces on the street. China is an enormous country with countless manhole covers, so we hope this is just the beginning of a delightful decoration process.

Photos by Wu Junjie/ China News Service

[via RocketNews24 and China News Service]