Los Angeles-based cinematographer directed this fascinating short documentary about Iijima Hiroki, a 22-year-old who fuses breakdancing moves with dextrous manipulation of an ancient Japanese skill toy called a Kendama.

The kendama consists of three wooden cups of different sizes placed on the center of a wooden spike, with a smaller cup at the spike’s base and a ball connected by a string to the center piece. It’s a complex variant of the cup-and-ball toy, but the two toys share the same principle, which is catching one object with another, where both are joined by a string.

Hiroki is a stylish and precise performer and clearly delights in every single moment spent playing with the kendama. He’s so good at it that he’s now redefining the game itself. Ballard calls a Kendama Samurai. We think he’s right.

[via Design You Trust]

What happens when two baroque cellists perform a cover of “Thunderstruck" by AC/DC? They shred. Literally. Keep an eye on their bows as the piece progresses.

This awesome video features Croatian cellists Luka Sulic and Stjepan Hauser, aka 2Cellos, playing their phenomenal “BaRock style” arrangement of the hard rock classic for a completely bewildered 17th century audience. The concept is wonderful, but the actual performance is astonishing.

[via Geeks are Sexy]

Each year for the past 15 years, Swedish artist and musician Tim Linhart carves violins, violas, cellos, guitars and marimbas out of solid ice for his Ice Music ensemble. A single instrument can take him up to one week to build. Aside from the strings and frets and so on, Linhart’s beautiful, otherwordly instruments are entirely made of ice and fully playable. They’re also illuminated by LEDs, which lends an additional dreamy quality to the performances.

Each winter Ice Music plays dozens of concerts inside a concert hall that’s also made of ice. In addition to classical pieces, they also perform country and bluegrass numbers. Because their frozen venue is kept at a constant chilly temperature of 23 °F (-5 °C), audience members are advised to dress warmly.

Click here to watch and listen to an Ice Music performance.

[via Neatorama and Classicalite]

Redditor duffman82991 shared this video of his remarkable father, musician and entertainer Leonard Solomon, performing Hungarian Dance No. 5 by Johannes Brahms on a strange and wonderful instrument of his own design, called the Majestic Bellowphone.

"No description can adequately convey the goose-honking and train-whistle cacophony of the Majestic Bellowphone."

That’s certainly true, but this delightful video is a great introduction.

Visit Leonard Solomon’s YouTube channel for more performances on his wonderfully wacky music machines, including the Oomphalapompatronium. (Then try to say that three times fast.)

[via Reddit]

As the final performance of their Movies in Real Life series (previously featured here), the irrepressible folks from New York-based prank collective Improv Everywhere headed down into the subway on a holiday-themed mission.

Three children board a full subway car while having an argument that seems strangely familiar. The argument quickly turns into a challenge, dares are issued and, before you know it, one of the kids has his tongue stuck firmly to a subway pole. That’s right, the troupe recreated the triple dog dare scene from A Christmas Story. And it’s pretty wonderful.

(But don’t worry, no one actually licked a filthy subway pole. Clever use was made of a prosthetic tongue with a magnet inside. Its effectiveness can be seen in the reactions on the faces of all the other passengers on the train.)

[via Improv Everywhere]

Get ready for some seriously bad-ass bagpipery. The Badpiper is a tattooed, mohawked, leather-kilted, big-booted punk rock piper from Perth, Western Australia who plays an awesome set of flame-throwing bagpipes.

In this video we see The Badpiper strutting, thrusting, and shooting rock ‘n’ roll flames to the tune of AC/DC’s “Thunderstruck” outside of the Jus Burgers in Fremantle, Western Australia. It’s an unforgettable sight.

[via Geekologie]

This video from the 2013 World Yo-Yo Contest is so awesome it defies description (but we’ll give it a try anyway). Watch Hungarian Yo-Yo champion Janos Karancz win first place at the competition with a 3 minute and 30 second-long performance that’s a deft and graceful blend of astonishing yo-yoing skills and some of the fastest cat’s cradle we’ve ever seen. Our mouths were wide open with wonder from start to finish.

Watch it once and then click here to watch it again in slow motion. If you didn’t think yo-yoing was an art form before, you will now.

[via Geekologie]

If you’re feeling stressed, this hypnotic video of Ian Jenson showing off his completely awesome Contact Juggling skills might help you unwind, or at least distract you for a little while. The video was made by Kuma Films at the National Taiwan University 台灣大學 in Taipei, Taiwan. There are moments when the ball appears to be floating in the air. We think that Ian might actually be a wizard. (Perhaps there’s a branch of Hogwarts hidden away somewhere in Taiwan.)

[via Kuriositas]

On March 25, 1983 Michael Jackson moonwalked on TV for the very first time. It subsequently became Michael’s signature move and is now one of the best-known dance techniques in the world.
The awesome moment occurred while Michael was performing “Billie Jean” during a television special called Motown 25: Yesterday, Today, Forever, which commemorated Motown Records’ twenty-fifth year of existence. This program not only broadcast the debut of the moonwalk, it also reunited Michael with the rest of the The Jackson 5.
[gif via GlobalGrind]

On March 25, 1983 Michael Jackson moonwalked on TV for the very first time. It subsequently became Michael’s signature move and is now one of the best-known dance techniques in the world.

The awesome moment occurred while Michael was performing “Billie Jean” during a television special called Motown 25: Yesterday, Today, Forever, which commemorated Motown Records’ twenty-fifth year of existence. This program not only broadcast the debut of the moonwalk, it also reunited Michael with the rest of the The Jackson 5.

[gif via GlobalGrind]

Magic and magicians are awesome. Magicians of the Internet is a new blog here on Tumblr that’s a colourful parade of all sorts of magicians posing and performing in magical publicity photos and head shots. Some of them are funny, some are frightening, and some of them are just plain strange or a bit of all of the above. All of them are awesome. Check it out!