In an episode of The Simpsons entitled “Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?” (Season 2, Episode 15), at the request of his newly-discovered half-brother Herb, Homer designs a new car: “The Homer.” It’s the car of Homer’s dreams, a car for the “average” American, a car so ridiculous and expensive that it completely ruins Powell Motors his half-brother’s business.

That hilarious episode first aired back in 1991. Now, more than twenty years later, engineers at Porcubimmer Motors have created The Homer for real, complete with a bubble dome, a horn that plays “La Cucaracha,” and, we’re guessing, an engine that sounds like “the world’s coming to an end.”

Click here to watch a video about this awesome vehicular monstrosity.

Photos by David Moore (click here to view more photos of The Homer)

[via Neatorama and Technabob]

Today the Department of Awesome Natural Wonders takes us to Ashikaga Flower Park in Tochigi, Japan, home to the country’s largest great wisteria. This colossal blooming vine is 144 years old and covers an area measuring 1,990 square meters (half an acre). Its numerous heavy branches are held up by a vast network of steel supports. In the spring countless racemes of pink and purple flowers bloom to form a vibrant canopy that practically brushes the heads of the park’s many visitors. If you’re planning a visit, the best time to behold this awesomely enchanting sight is from late April to mid May.

Photos by y-fu, tungnam.com.hk, Makoto Yoneda, P-Zilla, takeoh, Taka Ochiai, and Kazumi Ishikawa respectively.

Visit Demilked for additional images.

All of us at Archie McPhee were so happy to see Weird Al Yankovic wearing our Amazing Hypno Glasses on the cover of The Seattle Times! Plus, his new album Mandatory Fun is amazing. Our only disappointment is that he has a song called Tacky and we aren’t mentioned. 

(Photo of Weird Al by Casey Curry/Invision/AP)

The Department of Awesome Natural Phenomena just received word that Godzilla has been spotted unleashing his atomic breath into the skies somewhere over Michigan. Please watch out for flaming bits of kaiju falling from the sky.
(We’re still trying to figure out who actually took this photo. If you happen to know, please contact us so we can share proper credit info here)
[via Geekologie]

The Department of Awesome Natural Phenomena just received word that Godzilla has been spotted unleashing his atomic breath into the skies somewhere over Michigan. Please watch out for flaming bits of kaiju falling from the sky.

(We’re still trying to figure out who actually took this photo. If you happen to know, please contact us so we can share proper credit info here)

[via Geekologie]

This early 20th century photo reminds us of the Slicey the Pig Dashboard Wiggler. Could this be one of Slicey’s ancestors?

“The Pig Cafeteria” was an exhibit produced by the Department of Agriculture to educate farmers about new methods of farming and raising livestock — specifically, what to feed pigs so that they would be healthy and profitable.

Now we get it: Before a pig becomes so delicious that he starts offering up slices of himself for you to enjoy, he has to visit “The Pig Cafeteria” in order to fatten up.
[via Retronaut]

This early 20th century photo reminds us of the Slicey the Pig Dashboard Wiggler. Could this be one of Slicey’s ancestors?

“The Pig Cafeteria” was an exhibit produced by the Department of Agriculture to educate farmers about new methods of farming and raising livestock — specifically, what to feed pigs so that they would be healthy and profitable.

Now we get it: Before a pig becomes so delicious that he starts offering up slices of himself for you to enjoy, he has to visit “The Pig Cafeteria” in order to fatten up.

[via Retronaut]

Meet two of the tiniest avian members of the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders, a Green-crowned Brilliant hummingbird (Heliodoxa jacula) (top) and a Green Violetear hummingbird (Colibri thalassinus) (bottom). These stunning macro photos provide an remarkably close look at two incredibly small and fast-moving birds - both covered in the itty-bittiest feathers you’ll ever see. They were taken by photographer Chris Morgan in Costa Rica at the Bosque de Paz biological reserve in 2011.

"The hummingbirds were so tempting to photograph to the point of madness! Eventually with patience you get quite close, and I love seeing the details of these little guys," says Morgan.

Head over to Chris Morgan’s Flickr page to check out more of his wonderful photos, including an entire album of beautiful bird photos.

[via Lost At E Minor]

Some numbers are so big that they defy comprehension. So just in case you’ve ever wondered to yourself ‘What does it look like when 8 million flower petals fall on a Costa Rican village?’ Thanks to Sony, who launched a spectacular volley of 3.5 tons of colorful petals to create a promo for their new Ultra HD TVs, now we know. It looks awesome. It looks like a scene from a fairytale or a glimpse into someone’s beautiful dream.

"Organised by international advertising agency McCann, the idea was to cover the area near the Irazú Volcano – located in central Costa Rica – with a flower petal for every pixel in Sony’s 4K Ultra HD TV. McCann enlisted photographer Nick Meek and filmmaker Jaron Albertin to capture the colourful explosion.”

Visit Yellowtrace to watch the actual video and then click here for Sony’s behind-the-scenes video to learn how they did it using almost no digital trickery.

[via Yellowtrace]

Behold the awesomeness that is the world’s largest seamless print photograph. Entitled the Great Picture, this colossal Guinness World Record-holding image measures 107 feet wide by 31 feet high, covering an are of 3,375-square-feet.

Created in 2006, the Great Picture, was a collaborative effort by artists Jerry Burchfield, Mark Chamberlain, Jacques Garnier, Rob Johnson, Douglas McCulloh, Clayton Spada and hundreds of volunteers. And they did it using the world’s largest camera: an abandoned airplane hangar.

"They transformed an abandoned F/A-18 fighter jet hangar into a gigantic pinhole camera by darkening and sealing the interior from outside light. A pinhole, just under a quarter-inch in diameter (0.635 cm) was centered between the metal hangar doors to serve as the camera’s aperture."

"The hangar-turned-camera recorded a panoramic image of what was on the other side of the door using the centuries-old principle of “camera obscura” or pinhole camera. An image of the former El Toro Marine Corps Air Station with the San Joaquin Hills in the background, appeared upside down and flipped left to right on film after being projected through the tiny hole in the hangar’s metal door.”

The Great Picture is currently on display in in Chantilly, VA at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center through November 2014. Visit Twisted Sifter for additional images and to learn more about the incredible process that created this massive photo.

Photos by Robert Johnson, the Smithsonian Institution, Douglas McCulloh, and Dane Penland respectively.

[via Twisted Sifter]

Toronto-based artist/photographer and videographer Sara Angelucci created this awesomely surreal series of portraits combining anonymous 19th century carte-de-viste photos with images of extinct or endangered North American birds. Her beautifully strange series of bird people is called Aviary. Angelucci describes them as portraits that “portray creatures about to become ghosts.”

"Why birds? The photographer notes that her photographs are “hybrid crossovers of faith in science with a belief in otherworldly beings.” All of these birds were once plentiful during the late nineteenth century, and Angelucci’s humanizing of these delicate creatures is as much about respecting the earth and its creatures as it is about art."

Visit Sara Angelucci’s website to explore more of her intriguing artwork.

[via Beautiful/Decay and Design Observer]

The Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders invites you to pick up a pencil and consider the size of its eraser as you look at this amazing photo of wee baby poison dart frog taken by Andrew Cowie at the London Aquarium. The recently born baby frog is an endangered species and the first ever to be born at London’s aquarium.
Did you know that baby frogs (recently developed from tadpoles) are called froglets? The name is nearly as cute as the tiny amphibians themselves.
[via Telegraph.co.uk]

The Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders invites you to pick up a pencil and consider the size of its eraser as you look at this amazing photo of wee baby poison dart frog taken by Andrew Cowie at the London Aquarium. The recently born baby frog is an endangered species and the first ever to be born at London’s aquarium.

Did you know that baby frogs (recently developed from tadpoles) are called froglets? The name is nearly as cute as the tiny amphibians themselves.

[via Telegraph.co.uk]