For a wonderfully eerie ongoing project entitled Ghost Photographs American artist Angela Deane alters found photos, turning people into anonymous phantoms. The results range from amusing and delightful to wistful and melancholy. Deane’s painted snapshots reveal that ghosts go on vacation, attend prom and even go trick-or-treating. They have parties and gather to watch ballgames. It turns out that ghosts are just like the rest of us and we’re all ghosts ourselves.

"These ghosts are the ghosts of moments, of days, of experiences. With the specifics of identity obscured by paint I like to imagine it’s as if you and I can partake in the memory, share in the experience, allow the snapshot to seem familiar. Let’s share some memories, shall we?"

To view many more images from this haunting series follow Angela Deane here on Tumblr at ghostphotographs. Prints are available by contacting Deane through her personal website.

[via Junkculture and CreativeReview]

Sure, our new Eagle Talons look fantastic with our Eagle Mask, but we think they are just as amazing on their own. So, we came up with a list of things that are WAY MORE AWESOME when you’re wearing Eagle Talons. As you can see, listening to metal music, perching, teaching, picking pumpkins, being surprised, doing customer service, eating lunch and even playing prog-rock on multiple keyboards are all improved by having talons. 

You can get your own Eagle Talons here!

Source mcphee.com

Today the Department of Awesome Natural Phenomena teaches us about yet another amazing form of lightning: Red Sprite Lightning. Slovenian photographer Marko Korošec was chasing storms in Vivaro, Italy when he captured these spectacular images of red sprites flashing above a storm taking place over the central Adriatic sea.

"Sprites are large-scale electrical discharges that occur high above thunderstorm clouds, or cumulonimbus, giving rise to a quite varied range of visual shapes flickering in the night sky. They are triggered by the discharges of positive lightning between an underlying thundercloud and the ground. Sprites appear as luminous reddish-orange flashes. They often occur in clusters within the altitude range 50–90 km (31–56 mi) above the Earth’s surface.”

When red sprites flash they only last for a millisecond, so getting to see their beautiful display preserved in dazzling photos like these is an exceptionally rare treat.

Photos by Marko Korošec via Solent News/SIPA Press

[via Design You Trust and Wikipedia]

Today the Department of Awesome Natural Wonders is wondering what enchanted forest photographer Kayla M. Frost was exploring when she encountered this beautiful colony of Bearded Tooth Fungi (Hericium erinaceus) that looks like countless stalactites of sugary sweet frosting:

"i had a very long moment with this gorgeous family of bearded tooth fungi."

[via kaylafrost-portfolio]

Reblogged from kaylafrost-portfolio

Bangkok-based photographer Visarute Angkatavanich (previously featured here) continues to take breathtaking photos of Siamese fighting fish, also known as betta fish. His fascination with their splendid, flowing fins and brilliant coloring is apparent in the extraordinarily detailed portraits he creates. The photos are so perfectly clear and close-up that it’s easy to forget the fish are underwater and not floating in midair.

Angkatavanich recently told Popular Photography that he only started photographing the fish after encountering them for the first time three years ago at a fish show and has since become obsessed with the different species which vary greatly in size, shape, and color patterns.

Head over to Visarute Angkatavanich’s 500px gallery to view more of his gorgeous betta portraits. Limited edition prints of his photos are currently available through La Lanta Fine Art.

[via Colossal]

Just in time for Halloween, we’re happy to introduce our new Eagle Mask and Eagle Talons. The Eagle Mask is perfect for everyday use freaking people out, but it’s also great at political events. Someone shook hands with the president wearing a Horse Mask, imagine shaking talons with the president wearing an Eagle Mask. 
America’s Got Talons!
Buy them here

Just in time for Halloween, we’re happy to introduce our new Eagle Mask and Eagle Talons. The Eagle Mask is perfect for everyday use freaking people out, but it’s also great at political events. Someone shook hands with the president wearing a Horse Mask, imagine shaking talons with the president wearing an Eagle Mask. 

America’s Got Talons!

Buy them here

Source mcphee.com

Berlin, Germany-based fine art photographer and psychologist Markus Studtmann takes striking architectural photos that he later digitally deconstructs and recomposes to create awesome architectural illusions. He describes this process as Painting with Light:

"Although light and colors are captured with the camera, they were afterwards repainted in the digital darkroom in order to fit the artist’s vision and impressions. This results in unique images which extend beyond the realm of the camera and often resemble paintings or graphics."

Head over to Markus Studtmann’s 500px page to check out more of his dramatic and surreal cityscapes.

[via Scene360]

Swiss mountaineering photographer Robert Bösch (previously featured here) and Swiss mountaineering outfitter Mammut (previously featured here) make an awesome creative team. In collaboration with groups of impressively skilled and daring mountain climbers, they’ve produced some truly jaw-dropping photos.

The top photo is their most recent creation, a work of spectacular coordination and photographic skill. Shot on the famous Matterhorn in the Pennine Alps, a group of climbers positioned red lights to illuminate the route taken by English explorer Edward Whymper and his team back in 1865 when they became the first people to ascend the Matterhorn.

"…the planning and coordination that was required for this image was nothing short of astounding. Working against time and weather, Bösch and the team toiled endlessly to ensure they captured the best possible results that properly honored those who travelled the mountains before and inspired those who hope to in the future.”

Click here for a behind-the-scenes production video.

Head over to PetaPixel to view additional photos (and making-of videos) by Robert Bösch and Mammut.

The newest addition the Archie McPhee Library is an epic journey across the planet and back through time via a beautiful book entitled The Oldest Living Things in the World [Buy on Amazon] by Brooklyn-based contemporary artist Rachel Sussman. Nature is awesome and the Earth is very very old and Sussman spent the last 10 years researching, working with biologists and traveling in order to photograph the oldest continuously living organisms on the planet.

Spanning from Antarctica to Greenland, the Mojave Desert to the Australian Outback, the result is a stunning and unique visual collection of ancient organisms unlike anything that has been created in the arts or sciences before, insightfully and accessibly narrated by Sussman along the way.

These ancient individuals live on every continent and range from Greenlandic lichens that grow only one centimeter a century, to unique desert shrubs in Africa and South America, a predatory fungus in Oregon, Caribbean brain coral, to an 80,000-year-old colony of aspen in Utah. Sussman journeyed to Antarctica to photograph 5,500-year-old moss; Australia for stromatolites, primeval organisms tied to the oxygenation of the planet and the beginnings of life on Earth; and to Tasmania to capture a 43,600-year-old self-propagating shrub that’s the last individual of its kind.

To learn more about this awesome project, visit Rachel Sussman’s website and check out her  TED Talk from 2010.

[Images via Colossal and The New Yorker]

Lightning is awesome and today the Department of Awesome Natural Phenomena presents a form of lightning we’d never heard of before: blue jet lightning. This is a form of upper-atmospheric lightning, believed to be electrically induced forms of luminous plasma. It’s also known as a transient luminous event (or TLE) because the various types of electrical-discharge phenomena in the upper atmosphere lack several characteristics of the more familiar tropospheric lightning.
This stunning photo of blue jet lightning was captured by pilot and photographer Thijs Bors while flying over the Northern Territory of Australia during a thunderstorm. Blue jet lightning typically occurs in a narrow cone, projecting from the top of cumulonimbus clouds above a thunderstorm to the lowest levels of the ionosphere 40 to 50 km (25 to 30 miles) above the earth.
[via The Telegraph and Wikipedia]

Lightning is awesome and today the Department of Awesome Natural Phenomena presents a form of lightning we’d never heard of before: blue jet lightning. This is a form of upper-atmospheric lightning, believed to be electrically induced forms of luminous plasma. It’s also known as a transient luminous event (or TLE) because the various types of electrical-discharge phenomena in the upper atmosphere lack several characteristics of the more familiar tropospheric lightning.

This stunning photo of blue jet lightning was captured by pilot and photographer Thijs Bors while flying over the Northern Territory of Australia during a thunderstorm. Blue jet lightning typically occurs in a narrow cone, projecting from the top of cumulonimbus clouds above a thunderstorm to the lowest levels of the ionosphere 40 to 50 km (25 to 30 miles) above the earth.

[via The Telegraph and Wikipedia]