Don’t run away! This particular “Nightmare in Silver" is 100% edible and not the least bit interested in destroying all life on earth. This Cyberman is an awesome cake made by Happy Occasions Cakes, a bespoke bakery located in Cwmbran, Wales. While we understand that the existence of this geektastic cake creates a distinct conflict between the Whovian survival instinct and sweet tooth, we’re pretty sure our overwhelming love of cake would triumph in the end.

Visit the Happy Occasions Cakes Facebook Page to check out more of their fantastic custom creations.

[via That’s Nerdalicious!]

This adorable little hedgehog was made using almonds, eggs, cream, sugar and then even more almonds. We love him, not just because he’s so cute, but because he was created using a recipe that was written all the way back in 1817. Think about that for a second. What that means is that even 200 years ago people were coming up with novelty treats and edible sculptures shaped like ridiculously cute animals.
The recipe comes from a book entitled Treatise on Confectionary, written by Joseph Bell. Here it is:

To make a Hedge Hog.
Take 1lb. Valentia almonds; blanch and beat them very fine, with a little rose water; mix in the yolks of six eggs; whisk up the whites of four eggs very stiff; mix all together, with half a pint of cream, and sweeten it with beat sugar to your taste; set the whole in a stew pan on a clear fire, and stir it till it is thick enough to model into the shape of a hedge hog; put a small currant for each eye, and stick it all over with cut almonds for the bristles of the hedge hog; then set it on a dish, and pour over it a rich custard.

It’s actually possible that this recipe is even older still. It may be a reprint from this 1747 source. So the next time you find yourself daydreaming about 18th/19th century banquets, as we know some of you sometimes do, don’t forget to include the ornamental, edible almond hedgehog.
[via TYWKIWDBI and Echoes from the Vault]

This adorable little hedgehog was made using almonds, eggs, cream, sugar and then even more almonds. We love him, not just because he’s so cute, but because he was created using a recipe that was written all the way back in 1817. Think about that for a second. What that means is that even 200 years ago people were coming up with novelty treats and edible sculptures shaped like ridiculously cute animals.

The recipe comes from a book entitled Treatise on Confectionary, written by Joseph Bell. Here it is:

To make a Hedge Hog.

Take 1lb. Valentia almonds; blanch and beat them very fine, with a little rose water; mix in the yolks of six eggs; whisk up the whites of four eggs very stiff; mix all together, with half a pint of cream, and sweeten it with beat sugar to your taste; set the whole in a stew pan on a clear fire, and stir it till it is thick enough to model into the shape of a hedge hog; put a small currant for each eye, and stick it all over with cut almonds for the bristles of the hedge hog; then set it on a dish, and pour over it a rich custard.

It’s actually possible that this recipe is even older still. It may be a reprint from this 1747 source. So the next time you find yourself daydreaming about 18th/19th century banquets, as we know some of you sometimes do, don’t forget to include the ornamental, edible almond hedgehog.

[via TYWKIWDBI and Echoes from the Vault]

The Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders can’t stop marveling at the impeccably detailed, impossibly tiny miniature food created by Rochester, MN-based artist Kim of fairchildart. From fruit and veggies to mouthwatering main courses, tantalizing sweets, and even a cannibal’s feast, all of Kim’s 1:12 scale food sculptures are handmade using polymer clay, needles, colored chalk pastels, rocks, razor blades and awesome attention to detail.

"I started out in July of 2008 with a book by Sue Heaser called Making Doll’s House Miniatures with Polymer Clay. It’s a fantastic book with very easy to follow tutorials on everything from miniature potatoes to Tiffany style lamps. I was amazed at how such simple clay techniques could produce incredibly realistic results. From there I started using pictures of real food as a reference and it’s spiraled into an obsession ever since!”

When asked how she manages to make her miniature food look so realistic, Kim says that secret to her success is: “a good dose of artistic masochism and being a stickler for details.”

Click here to view lots more of Kim’s fantastically food miniatures.

She also has pieces available for purchase via the fairchildart Etsy shop.

[via DeMilked]

If you’re looking way to experience 4th of July fireworks that’s less risky for your fingers and a whole lot more delicious, look no further. Our all-time favourite Dessert Detective Jessie Oleson, aka Cakespy (previously featured here), recently shared her awesome recipe for Explosively Delicious Fourth of July Cookies.

The not-so-secret explosive ingredient is Pop Rocks. In this recipe they’re used in both the cookie dough itself and as a garnish.

"This not only makes them crackle like fireworks but also pays homage to that other all-consuming american obsession: truly trashy candy (and I say this in the most loving way possible)."

Click here for the recipe and instructions.

[via CakeSpy]

We’d like to add that you can dramatically transform this recipe in three different, but equally awesome ways by substituting the Pop Rocks with Sizzling Bacon Candy, Explosing Wasabi Candy or Exploding Popcorn Candy.

Macabre baking maven Annabel de Vetten of Conjurer’s Kitchen (previously featured here) created this deliciously gruesome dissected cake in response to frequently being asked what’s inside her elaborately decorated cakes and what they taste like:

"Of course only the pretty cakes look like this on the inside, all the creepy and unusual cakes are yummy sponge cakes in many different flavours! ;-)

OK, so I’m kidding. Everything is tasty.”

[via Conjurer’s Kitchen]

Los Angeles-based artist and baker Christine McConnell (previously featured here) just shared a fantastic selection of truly monstrous baked goods over on Reddit.

Here you see a batch of waffle cones that turned into a nest of ferocious be-tentacled beasties, a terrifyingly realistic facehugger made of sugar cookies (glued together with caramel and glazed with milk, sugar and nutmeg), an adorable chicken pot pie (with beak and feet carved from carrots), a fiery Danzig birthday cake, tarantula cookies prepared like Girl Scout Samoas, and a spectacular birthday cake created for a Voodoo-Bayou themed party. The tongue of the snake atop the cake is a handmade candle.

Click here to view even more of Christine McConnell’s awesome edible creations.

[via Reddit]

We continue to be blown away by the awesome (and completely edible) 3D-printed sugar sculptures created by The Sugar Lab team at 3D Systems (previously featured here). Pictured here are some of their geometric sugar cubes, ornate cake toppers, gorgeous sculptural pieces and a futuristic vase that feels like it belongs in an episode of Star Trek. They were all created using the ChefJet™ series of kitchen-ready 3D printers for edibles, which are expected to be on the market in the second half of 2014.

The Sugar Lab is currently had some of their 3D printed confections available for purchase via Cubify.

Head over to Twisted Sifter for additional images.

Here in the northern hemisphere summer has officially begun, which means the time is ripe for picnics and tricking treating friends and family alike to ice cream sandwiches that looks just like mouthwatering cheeseburgers.

These fantastic frozen treats were created by Beth Klosterboer of Hungry Happenings (previously featured here), who dubbed them Chilly Cheeseburgers (get it?). The buns are made of vanilla cake, the beef patty is chocolate ice cream and the fixings are made of modeling chocolate and cookie icing. Yum!

Click here for the complete recipe and instructions.

[via Foodiggity]

Turkish artist Hasan Kale (previously featured here) continues to dazzle the Department of Miniature Marvels with his ability to paint beautiful scenes from his native Istanbul on the teeniest, tiniest objects. No challenge is too great, no seed or nut too small. Kale has even painted a piece of chocolate and the inside of a peanut shell.

Visit Hasan Kale’s Facebook page to check out more of his awesomely itsy-bitsy paintings.

[via Scene 360]

There’s no question that a stack of fresh pancakes is awesome, but what about one giant fluffy pancake? Today we learned mixing a batch of pancake batter in the bowl of a rice cooker and then cooking it, just like you would when making a batch of rice, creates one great big floofy pancake that instantly reminds us of Totoro’s belly.

What’s more, just like regular pancakes, you can add all sorts of things to the batter, such as cocoa powder or pieces of fruit and chocolate, to further enhance your adorably plump tototorcake.

Head over to RocketNews24 for complete instructions as well as some helpful tips and suggestions.