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36 posts tagged Robots

Pittsburgh, PA-based graphic designer and writer Don Moyer likes to draw things that make him laugh. That’s why he’s been hard at work on a fantastic series of drawings based on traditional blue willow china plate patterns. The designs look authentic except for one extraordinary difference: the otherwise tranquil design on each plate includes some sort of unexpected calamity. It could be an alien invasion or natural disaster. It could be a sea monster or a swarm of bats. It could even be a giant zombie poodle, flying monkeys or robots. There are simply so many ways that disaster might strike.

Moyer calls this awesome ongoing series Calamityware. Two of his designs (the flying monkeys and the giant robot) have been produced as actual porcelain plates thanks to successfully funded Kickstarter projects.

Check out Don Moyer’s Calamityware Flickr set to view more of his designs.

[via Lost at E Minor]

Wilmington, Delaware-based artist Brian Marshall creates awesome robot sculptures by reusing just about any metal object he can get his hands on. Forgotten boxes in the backs of attics and garages are his treasure chests. For Marshall, building lively little robots out of old cutlery, spice tins and car parts isn’t simply a hobby, it’s an obsession. That’s why he created Adopt-a-bot: the Found Object Art Robot Assemblage Orphanage.

"Each robot is constructed almost entirely from reused materials. These materials are cleaned and polished to varying degrees depending on the persona I am attempting to achieve. Even the nuts and bolts that are used to hold together each creation are from a recycler. With simple, fun designs that contain easily recognizable pieces, it is my hope that viewers will not only find a personality to connect with, but that they will also see the value of and possibilities for reducing, reusing and recycling in our world today."

Visit Brian Marshall’s Flickr page to view many more of his recycled robots. And if you’re in the market for adopting a robot of your own, check out the Adopt-a-bot Orphanage.

[via Weezbo]

San Francisco-based design professor and illustrator Miguel Cardona transforms ordinary paper coffee cups into bold works of art. Because of the curved surface of his canvas of choice, each piece is rendered freehand and he thoroughly enjoys the challenges that this presents:

"You have this three-dimensional object that is in your hands, you can pull the cup in a different direction and hold the pen still. You can also hide a lot of flawed perspective. You don’t need a desk, it can be done anywhere, and to protect it, you can stack it in another blank cup. The cup itself can hold your art supplies and is itself, a display stand, it’s quite the perfect design."

Cardona’s subjects vary from pop culture character and icons to robots, monsters, and even bodily organs. But these beautiful illustrations aren’t quite as awesome as what he does with them. Miguel sells each finished piece for $20 and donates 100% of the proceeds to Project Night Night, which donates baby blankets, children’s books, and toys to children in homeless shelters.

Visit Miguel Cardona’s website to check out more of his fantastic illustrated coffee cups.

[via Design Taxi and Cool Hunting]

From rings hidden inside cupcakes to skywriters to signs on cows, lots of people go out of their way to make a grand gesture when proposing marriage. One particularly ambitious, lovestruck, and geeky man in China decided that the best way to pop the question to his beloved was to build a 30-foot-tall model of Optimus Prime that would ask for his true love’s hand in marriage.

He built the Autobot leader out of over 40,000 rivets and almost $10,000 worth of iron and stainless steel, working through 400 drawings over the ten months it took him to transform a pile of metal and bolts into one amazing looking metal sculpture.

We’re guessing that the fact that the lucky lady was photographed posing with her beau’s giant transformer means she probably said yes.
[via Neatorama]

From rings hidden inside cupcakes to skywriters to signs on cows, lots of people go out of their way to make a grand gesture when proposing marriage. One particularly ambitious, lovestruck, and geeky man in China decided that the best way to pop the question to his beloved was to build a 30-foot-tall model of Optimus Prime that would ask for his true love’s hand in marriage.

He built the Autobot leader out of over 40,000 rivets and almost $10,000 worth of iron and stainless steel, working through 400 drawings over the ten months it took him to transform a pile of metal and bolts into one amazing looking metal sculpture.

We’re guessing that the fact that the lucky lady was photographed posing with her beau’s giant transformer means she probably said yes.

[via Neatorama]

Redditor downvotedagain shared this photo of an incredibly awesome Gingerbread Optimus Prime that was made by 3D and compositing artist Caroline Eriksson for a gingerbread contest put on by Melange, a Norwegian company which produces a margarine-based spread.
The contest winner will be awarded with a travel gift card worth about $6500. Good luck Caroline!
Click here to view more amazing gingerbread contest entries.
[via Geekologie]

Redditor downvotedagain shared this photo of an incredibly awesome Gingerbread Optimus Prime that was made by 3D and compositing artist Caroline Eriksson for a gingerbread contest put on by Melange, a Norwegian company which produces a margarine-based spread.

The contest winner will be awarded with a travel gift card worth about $6500. Good luck Caroline!

Click here to view more amazing gingerbread contest entries.

[via Geekologie]

Behold the awesomeness that is the Mantis Hexapod or Mantis Walking Machine, a hydraulic powered hexapod walking machine created by Matt Denton and his team at Micromagic Systems. After four years of design and development, the Mantis is the largest all-terrain operational hexapod robot in the world.

"Mantis runs off a 2.2-litre, 50 horsepower turbo diesel engine, and it stands 2.8 meters (9 feet) tall. It can be piloted directly or controlled via wifi. Functionally, it can manipulate objects (like pushing a trailer) or fold itself into a truck bed.

As of now, Mantis walks around at the achingly slow pace of 1 km/hr. Its navigational software has to rely solely on the information given to it by its legs as they touch the ground. Future versions will likely utilize visual systems, allowing Mantis to evaluate the topography of its environment in advance.”

If you’re looking to host a truly memorable occasion, considering a career in supervillainy, or simply want to scare the pants off your curmudgeonly neighbour(s), the Mantis is available for private hire, custom commissions, events, and sponsorships.

This video was shot during field tests in May and October 2012. Click here for more Mantis videos.

[via io9]

DeviantARTist madaigual created this delightful yet bittersweet piece of digital Doctor Who fan art (top image). Entitled His Master’s Voice, the piece depicts K-9, the Fourth Doctor’s robotic dog companion (who addressed the Doctor as “Master”), listening to a gramophone which appears to be playing a recording of the Doctor Who theme. Madaigual even used the image from an actual album cover bearing the face of Tom Baker, who played the Fourth Doctor.

This clever piece was inspired by the famous painting of the same title created by English painter Francis Barraud in 1899. The original painting (second image) depicting Barraud’s late brother’s dog listening to a recording of his dead master’s voice. The original painting has been a trademark in the music business since 1900, and for many years was also the name of a large record label.

[via Neatorama]

Japanese Twitter user Dori Asuka used boxes of Morinaga carmels (and all sorts of papercraft skill) to create this awesome Golden Warrior Gold Lightan robot. It also transforms from humble candy box shape to mighty robot shape.

"Anime Golden Warrior Gold Lightan aired in Japan during the early 1980s and followed the adventures of a young boy and a gold cigarette lighter than turned into a giant robot. Oh, the days when children could have transforming lighters!”

Visit Kotaku for more information and lots of process photos of Dori Asuka’s fantastic paper robot. We hope all of those tasty caramels were eating during the design and construction process.