Remember that incredibly awesome Edgar Allan Poe sculpture we shared a couple weeks ago? That was the work of artist Stefanie Rocknak, and so is this amazing sculpture, which she carved from a single piece of wood.

Entitled The Swimmer, the sculpture is slightly larger than life-size and depicts a swimmer turning their head to take a breath during the crawl stroke. The sense of movement, both by the athlete and the water, is so palpable that we keep waiting for the swimmer to turn their face back into the water, complete the stroke and swim right out of the photos.

The Swimmer is the third part of a three piece commission called The Triathlete. The other two pieces are The Biker and The Runner. Click the links to check them out.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

Joyce Lin is a student at the Rhode Island School of Design and in her spare time she creates awesome interactive kinetic sculptures like the beautiful flying fish and bird study pieces pictured here. Although the design and construction process must’ve been painstaking, they were made using simple materials such as popsicle sticks, mylar and tracing vellum.

Speaking about her work she says, “When people view and activate my sculptures, I would like them to feel a kind of childlike awe and wonderment while being reminded that we are part of an infinite chain of systems within systems.”

Visit Joyce Lin’s Behance page to check out more of her creations.

[via Junkculture]

This awesome sculpture is a fully-functioning pipe organ made of 250 empty Pringles cans. It was created by Brooklyn-based mixed-media artist collective Fall On Your Sword, who explain that their inspiration for the project came from the organ seen in The Goonies.

Will Bates, cofounder of Fall On Your Sword, explains how the Pringles organ works:

"We built ten keys below the organ’s pipes by connecting the cans to springs. Pushing a key triggers a tone, causing air generated by hidden fans within the tubes to flow out of the pipes at the top of the organ. "We want the piece to feel like a real instrument, so the tones will be based on manipulated recordings of organ tones and resonances played through the cans themselves. Participants can make up their own tune, and have their own unique experience with the piece."

Click here for video of the Pringles organ in action.

[via Junkculture]

New York-based artist Thomas Doyle creates beautifully detailed and thoroughly unsettling mixed media dioramas using models and materials originally made for model train sets. Houses fall from the sky and crash into the earth, creating dystopian suburban scenes. Elsewhere another home and its residents have been completely reclaimed by nature. However Doyle is not trying to tell specific tales with these scenes. Instead he leave the interpretation up to the viewer. Choose your own (disastrous) adventure.

Doyle is currently showing work at the Torrance Art Museum as part of the Prep School: Prepper and Survivalist ideologies and utopianism/dystopian visions show, which runs through May 15, 2014.

Click here for a bref video about Thomas Doyle and his haunting dioramas.

[via Colossal]

New York City-based artist Andy Yoder used thousands of hand-painted matchsticks to create this awesome globe. The painstaking process took him two years, during which each match was glued onto a foam and cardboard frame inside a plywood skeleton. Entitled Early One Morning, the sculpture measures 42” in diameter.

And in case you’re daydreaming about setting this matchstick Earth on fire, Yoder’s son, Redditor yoderaustin, explained that the entire piece has been doused with flame retardant.

Early One Morning will be on display from May 8 -11, 2014 at the PULSE New York Contemporary Art Fair.

Click here for additional photos.

[via Junkculture]

The city of Boston is soon going to receive one of the most awesome statues we’ve ever seen. After a lengthy review process, professional sculptor Stefanie Rocknak has just been chosen to create a sculpture honoring Edgar Allan Poe, one of literature’s most unforgettable and influential authors and poets. Rocknak was selected from a field of 266 artist from 42 states and 13 countries, each of whom submitted proposals for the Edgar Allan Poe Square Public Art Project.

Rocknak’s appropriately dramatic and haunting sculpture will be called Poe Returning to Boston:

“I propose to cast a life-size figure of Poe in bronze. Just off the train, the figure would be walking south towards his place of birth, where his mother and father once lived. Poe, with a trunk full of ideas—and worldwide success—is finally coming home.”

"His expression is complex. He is determined and his stride is decisive. His face reflects a mixture of pain, anger and sadness, and from some angles, a subtle sense of hope. As he walks towards Carver Street, he openly dismisses what is behind him with his left hand; the Frogpondians to the north. Boston is not claiming Poe, Poe is claiming Boston. To punctuate this, he leaves a literal paper trail behind him. He has not only left his mark on the world, he has left it on the city of his birth. His ideas are jumping off the page and cascading out of his trunk; a heart lies just behind him, and an oversized Raven explodes to the south. The Raven, which has become symbolic of Poe’s brooding creative spirit, visually reflects Poe; his coat mimics the raven’s wing, and, like a bird, Poe is slightly pigeon-toed. They are one, heading up-wind towards their final resting place."

The photos seen here show the final design model, which was made of clay. The real Poe Returning to Boston will be unveiled on October 4, 2014, three days before the 165th anniversary of Poe’s untimely death. Poe and his raven will haunt the corner of Boylston Street and Charles Street South, a location dubbed Edgar Allan Poe Square during bicentennial celebrations in 2009, just two blocks north of the writer’s actual birthplace.

As lifelong fans of Poe, we’re both thrilled and a little envious. We’ll simply have to add this to our sightseeing list the next time we’re in Boston.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

Reese Moore lives in Volusia, Florida and has never ridden a motorcycle, but that doesn’t stop him from designing and hand-crafting incredible Bone Motorcycles like the Cowasaki seen here. For a mere $55,000 this awesome bonecycle could be yours.

Moore spends about a year collecting all the bones necessary to create one bone motorcycle. The average piece consists of “3-4 cow skulls, 2-3 alligator skulls, goat, wolf, raccoon, turtle, and pig bones. Also it takes 1 cow back for each of the wheels.” The bones are taken from dead animals found on the side of the road or carcasses pointed out to him by farmers and hunters. After all the necessary pieces have been collected, it takes Moore about one week to sand them down and assemble the bike. Exactly how he does it is a closely-guarded secret. He’s has been doing this for over 10 years now. But before that he worked as a snake wrangler.

Visit Uproxx to learn more about Reese Moore and his wonderfully macabre creations.

This awesome, but inedible Cherry Pie Mule is the work of Fort Lauderdale, FL-based artist Robert Tabor. It features a sculpted fork heel and cherry pie toe made of sculpted clay. It was decorated with, various acrylic and glass beads, fabrics, trims, and crystal rhinestones.
Click here to view more of Tabor’s amazing Fantasy Shoe Sculptures.
The Cherry Pie Mule is currently available via Robert’s Etsy shop, Sole Sensations.
[via CMYBacon]

This awesome, but inedible Cherry Pie Mule is the work of Fort Lauderdale, FL-based artist Robert Tabor. It features a sculpted fork heel and cherry pie toe made of sculpted clay. It was decorated with, various acrylic and glass beads, fabrics, trims, and crystal rhinestones.

Click here to view more of Tabor’s amazing Fantasy Shoe Sculptures.

The Cherry Pie Mule is currently available via Robert’s Etsy shop, Sole Sensations.

[via CMYBacon]

Here’s a slice of pumpkin pie made of canned food. It’s a piece of PumpCAN Pie and it was designed and built by Desimone Consulting Engineers in 2009 for Canstruction event in New York. The team used 2,580 cans of tuna, sardines, evaporated milk, baked beans and cream corn to build the slice of pie and fork. If you’re wondering why they didn’t use canned pumpkin, it’s because there was a pumpkin shortage that year.
Canstruction is an international charity which hosts public events showcasing awesome structures made entirely out of cans of food. At the end of each event all of the canned food is donated to local hungry relief organizations.
The Desimone Consulting Engineers’ PumpCAN Pie was one of 30 canned food sculptures that helped contribute to a total of 100,693 cans of food which were donated to the City Harvest food rescue organization.
Photo by Monica Schipper
Visit Woman’s Day to check out more canned food sculptures from the 2009 NY Canstruction event.

Here’s a slice of pumpkin pie made of canned food. It’s a piece of PumpCAN Pie and it was designed and built by Desimone Consulting Engineers in 2009 for Canstruction event in New York. The team used 2,580 cans of tuna, sardines, evaporated milk, baked beans and cream corn to build the slice of pie and fork. If you’re wondering why they didn’t use canned pumpkin, it’s because there was a pumpkin shortage that year.

Canstruction is an international charity which hosts public events showcasing awesome structures made entirely out of cans of food. At the end of each event all of the canned food is donated to local hungry relief organizations.

The Desimone Consulting Engineers’ PumpCAN Pie was one of 30 canned food sculptures that helped contribute to a total of 100,693 cans of food which were donated to the City Harvest food rescue organization.

Photo by Monica Schipper

Visit Woman’s Day to check out more canned food sculptures from the 2009 NY Canstruction event.