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45 posts tagged Skull

Halloween is an awesome source of inspiration for hobo nickel artists. This spooktacular hobo nickel, entitled Nightmares of the Fall, was engraved on a 1936 Full Horn Buffalo Nickel by Russian-born, New Jersey-based engraver-designer Aleksey Saburov. All of the engraving was done by hand and the piece was finished with 24-karat gold, silver and copper inlay.

It’s currently up for auction on ebay.

Visit Aleksey Saburov’s website to explore more of his amazing engraved artwork.

[via Hobo Nickel Art]

This awesome Skull Chair looks like the perfect place to sit with your bowl of Halloween candy as you wait for trick-or-treaters to visit. Created by Hong Kong-based home design company Chic Sin Design, the movable jaw features a hinge so you can sit in the open mouth, leaning back against the palate, or close it to simply have a gigantic skull grinning at everyone in your room.

Click here for additional details and here for a 360 degree view.

Currently available via the Chic Sin Design Etsy shop.

[via Geekologie]

Have you ever noticed how closely walnut halves resemble human brains? Bilbao, Spain-based designers Ruth and Sira Garcia made deliciously macabre use of that resemblance with their awesome series of Chocolate Skulls Gone Nuts. Each grinning chocolate skull features an exposed brain made of walnut or candy.

Visit the project’s Behance page for additional images.

[via Neatorama]

October has begun, which means Halloween is only weeks away. Here’s a mouthwateringly macabre skull pancake by Nathan Shields (previously featured here) to help darken the mood.
But wait, your enjoyment of this spooky breakfast treat doesn’t have to stop with this photo. Click here for a skull pancake tutorial video and then go whip up your very own batch of frightful flapjacks.
[via Saipancakes]

October has begun, which means Halloween is only weeks away. Here’s a mouthwateringly macabre skull pancake by Nathan Shields (previously featured here) to help darken the mood.

But wait, your enjoyment of this spooky breakfast treat doesn’t have to stop with this photo. Click here for a skull pancake tutorial video and then go whip up your very own batch of frightful flapjacks.

[via Saipancakes]

As creators of squirrel-centric items such as the Horse Head Squirrel Feeder, the Squirrel Coffee Cup and, of course, Squirrel Underpants, we were delighted to learn about British photographer Max Ellis' ongoing series of silly squirrel photos.

Ellis works as a freelance digital illustrator and photographer, but in his spare time he takes awesome wildlife photos, including these photos from his Squirrel Series, for which he stages scenes and builds models - like miniature cardboard cannons and saw-the-lady-in-half magic sets - for the insatiably curious (and hungry) squirrels to interact with (while also getting a tasty snack). Max insists that none of his exceptionally well-fed, bushy-tailed models have ever been harmed during a photo shoot.

“I’m experimenting with more elaborate props and new ideas come to me daily. They constantly surprise me with their intelligence and dexterity so its great fun coming up with new ideas!”

“I try to use very little retouching in the shots. My other day job is as one of the world’s most successful digital illustrators, I’ve headed up hundreds of ad campaigns over the 30 years I’ve been professional and it would be too easy to fake it. The only time I edit is to get rid of the fishing line on the skull one and the dumbbell one. I felt it spoiled the image.”

Visit Max Ellis’ website and 500px page to check out many more of his photographs. For the past four years he’s also been posting a daily photo over at blipfoto.com/maxellis, including shots of his squirrel friends.

[via Bored Panda]

The Art Fund, a UK-based charity which raises money to help galleries purchase and exhibit works of art, is using edible artwork as an upcoming fundraising initiative called Edible Masterpieces. It’s a philanthropic bake-off.

To help inspire prospective participants, the Art Fund created and staged a series of recipes, which include a Mondrian-inspired Battenberg cake, a Jackson Pollock-themed rice krispies treat, and a glittering skill-shaped cake made in the likeness of Damien Hirst’s diamond-encrusted skull. For those more inclined towards a savory treat there’s even a van Gogh-inspired ploughman’s lunch.

All funds raised will be used to support UK museums and galleries. Click here to learn more.

Photos by Maja smend, food styling by Kim Morphew, prop styling by Lydia Brun, recipes by Georgia Levy

Visit designboom to view a couple more Edible Masterpieces.

New Delhi-based artist Subodh Gupta repurposes everyday materials, turning them into iconic symbols and creating awesome sculptures like this skull made of stainless steel containers and kitchen utensils. Entitled Very Hungry God, the striking 8 foot tall sculpture weighs nearly a ton. It was made in 2006 for the Nuit Blanche annual all-night art festival in Paris.

Here’s how Subodh Gupta described his piece:

"My work was conceived to be shown in a church in Barbes on the outskirts of Paris which is largely inhabited by an immigrant population. I made the work in response to the stories I read in the news about how soup kitchens in Paris were serving food with pork so that Muslims would not eat it. It was a strange and twisted form of charity that did not continue for long but raised conflicting ideas of giving and the way we have become now.

Outside the church I served vegetarian daal soup as a form of “prasad” (in India when you go to a temple or a guduwara you are offered food with the blessing). I liked the mix of the Catholic church and my intervention using a symbol that many artists have used before – the skull – and its many connotations.”

[via The Kick It Spot and 1800recycling.com]

Designers Liz and Kyle von Hasseln of The Sugar Lab (previously featured here ) teamed up with artist Josh Harker (previously featured here) to create this stunning one-of-a-kind 3D-printed El Dia de los Muertos filigree sugar skull. Based on Harker’s Cráneo de La Calaca and created for Halloween 2013, this edible beauty is one of the loveliest sugar skulls we’ve ever seen.

[via Lost At E Minor and Cubify]

Do you remember the amazing skeleton we posted about awhile back belonging to an awesome woman fitted with a prosthetic eye that had originally been gilt and engraved to look like a sun? We sure do.
Artist Nick Beecher recently took up the challenge to illustrate what she may have looked like in life and we think his interpretation is pretty awesome.

archiemcphee:
Here’s an awesome little piece of history:
Archaeologists in the Burnt City have discovered what appears to be an ancient prosthetic eye. What makes this discovery exceptionally awesome is the striking description of how the owner and her false eye would have appeared while she was still alive and blinking:

[The eye] has a hemispherical form and a diameter of just over 2.5 cm (1 inch). It consists of very light material, probably bitumen paste. The surface of the artificial eye is covered with a thin layer of gold, engraved with a central circle (representing the iris) and gold lines patterned like sun rays. The female remains found with the artificial eye was 1.82 m tall (6 feet), much taller than ordinary women of her time. On both sides of the eye are drilled tiny holes, through which a golden thread could hold the eyeball in place. Since microscopic research has shown that the eye socket showed clear imprints of the golden thread, the eyeball must have been worn during her lifetime. The woman’s skeleton has been dated to between 2900 and 2800 BCE.

So she was an extraordinarily tall woman walking around wearing an engraved golden eye patterned with rays like a tiny sun. What an awesome sight that must have been.
[via TYWKIWDBI]

knottybear: Wow.
fangirequeen: SOMEONE DRAW HER PLEASE
beecharts:
CHALLENGE ACCEPTED!!

Do you remember the amazing skeleton we posted about awhile back belonging to an awesome woman fitted with a prosthetic eye that had originally been gilt and engraved to look like a sun? We sure do.

Artist Nick Beecher recently took up the challenge to illustrate what she may have looked like in life and we think his interpretation is pretty awesome.

archiemcphee:

Here’s an awesome little piece of history:

Archaeologists in the Burnt City have discovered what appears to be an ancient prosthetic eye. What makes this discovery exceptionally awesome is the striking description of how the owner and her false eye would have appeared while she was still alive and blinking:

[The eye] has a hemispherical form and a diameter of just over 2.5 cm (1 inch). It consists of very light material, probably bitumen paste. The surface of the artificial eye is covered with a thin layer of gold, engraved with a central circle (representing the iris) and gold lines patterned like sun rays. The female remains found with the artificial eye was 1.82 m tall (6 feet), much taller than ordinary women of her time. On both sides of the eye are drilled tiny holes, through which a golden thread could hold the eyeball in place. Since microscopic research has shown that the eye socket showed clear imprints of the golden thread, the eyeball must have been worn during her lifetime. The woman’s skeleton has been dated to between 2900 and 2800 BCE.

So she was an extraordinarily tall woman walking around wearing an engraved golden eye patterned with rays like a tiny sun. What an awesome sight that must have been.

[via TYWKIWDBI]

knottybearWow.

fangirequeen: SOMEONE DRAW HER PLEASE

beecharts:

CHALLENGE ACCEPTED!!

Source archiemcphee

Reblogged from archiemcphee