This unbelievably cute and smiley little cephalopod is known as a Piglet Squid (Helicocranchia pfefferi). Its skin patterns form the adorable shape of a small smiling face and its tentacles look like curly locks of hair on its head.
The Piglet Squid has been so-named because of its rotund shape, which comes from its habit of filling itself up with water. They are roughly the size of a small avocado, and common in the deep, dark waters of virtually all of ours oceans, living at depths of around 100m/320ft.
Measuring just 3.9cm (10cm) in length, this squid species has large light-producing organs, or photophores, located beneath each of its large eyes that help it navigate the dark watery depths.
Because they live in such deep waters, little is known about Piglet Squid behaviour. However, judging by it’s humourous shape, it should come as no surprise that they’re understood to be sluggish swimmer.
Piglet squid have seldom been photographed, another consequence of inhabiting such deep water. This particular specimen was captured on film at the Cabrillo Marine Aquarium in San Pedro, California by aquarium director Mike Schaat.
[via Telegraph.co.uk and Practical Fishkeeping]

This unbelievably cute and smiley little cephalopod is known as a Piglet Squid (Helicocranchia pfefferi). Its skin patterns form the adorable shape of a small smiling face and its tentacles look like curly locks of hair on its head.

The Piglet Squid has been so-named because of its rotund shape, which comes from its habit of filling itself up with water. They are roughly the size of a small avocado, and common in the deep, dark waters of virtually all of ours oceans, living at depths of around 100m/320ft.

Measuring just 3.9cm (10cm) in length, this squid species has large light-producing organs, or photophores, located beneath each of its large eyes that help it navigate the dark watery depths.

Because they live in such deep waters, little is known about Piglet Squid behaviour. However, judging by it’s humourous shape, it should come as no surprise that they’re understood to be sluggish swimmer.

Piglet squid have seldom been photographed, another consequence of inhabiting such deep water. This particular specimen was captured on film at the Cabrillo Marine Aquarium in San Pedro, California by aquarium director Mike Schaat.

[via Telegraph.co.uk and Practical Fishkeeping]