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81 posts tagged Strange

This early 20th century photo reminds us of the Slicey the Pig Dashboard Wiggler. Could this be one of Slicey’s ancestors?

“The Pig Cafeteria” was an exhibit produced by the Department of Agriculture to educate farmers about new methods of farming and raising livestock — specifically, what to feed pigs so that they would be healthy and profitable.

Now we get it: Before a pig becomes so delicious that he starts offering up slices of himself for you to enjoy, he has to visit “The Pig Cafeteria” in order to fatten up.
[via Retronaut]

This early 20th century photo reminds us of the Slicey the Pig Dashboard Wiggler. Could this be one of Slicey’s ancestors?

“The Pig Cafeteria” was an exhibit produced by the Department of Agriculture to educate farmers about new methods of farming and raising livestock — specifically, what to feed pigs so that they would be healthy and profitable.

Now we get it: Before a pig becomes so delicious that he starts offering up slices of himself for you to enjoy, he has to visit “The Pig Cafeteria” in order to fatten up.

[via Retronaut]

These strangely hypnotic gifs are the work of Dundee, Scotland-based illustrator Sam Lyon. He calls them Jelly Gummies. There’s something about these fleshy, pulsating, amorphous creatures - a combination of anthropomorphism, creepiness, and our inexplicable suspicion that they’d be both fun to chew on and pleasing to taste - that makes them awesome.

You can find more of Lyon’s perpetually mutating Jelly Gummies right here on Tumblr at jellygummies. He also has a Jelly Gummies Etsy shop, just in case you’d like to invite some of this wonderfully squishy weirdness into your home.

[via designboom]

Summer is here, which means we can look forward to enjoying more awesome sand sculptures. When it comes to the visionary creations of Guy-Olivier Deveau, professional sand, ice, snow and wood sculptor, it’s less about simply enjoying and than marveling at followed by hoping something else comes to mind before turning out the lights at night.

You can check out more of Deveau’s epic sand sculptures by following him right here on Tumblr at godeveau.

[via Screenburn]

Here’s the latest addition to the Archie McPhee Library: The Mincing Mockingbird Guide to Troubled Birds [Buy on Amazon], written and illustrated by Matt Adrian, aka naturalist The Mincing Mockingbird.

In a journal entry Kurt Cobain once wrote, “Birds…scream at the top of their lungs in horrified hellish rage every morning at daybreak to warn us all of the truth. They know the truth. Screaming bloody murder all over the world in our ears, but sadly we don’t speak bird.”

That is, no one spoke bird until The Mincing Mockingbird took a swing at it and made some truly startling discoveries. Looking like a damaged library book (which was no doubt damaged by a deranged bird) The Mincing Mockingbird Guide to Troubled Birds is a beautifully illustrated “pocket field guide that enables anyone to quickly identify psychotic, violent or mentally unstable bird species. Written in non-technical language for the layman, the guide describes where to find—or where to avoid—the most disturbed North American birds.”

Throw out your other bird guides. The world is full of hilariously demented birds and, short of going outside and putting yourself and your corn chips in danger, this is the only true resource.

"Throughout the book the reader will discover tales of murder, assault, mental breakdowns, obesity, drug abuse and infidelity among the birds. This guide is used and recommended by law enforcement agencies and ignored by leading ornithologists."

Many of illustrations are paired with brief stories told by the birds themselves. The back of the book contains bird attack statistics from 1970 and a list of study questions to make sure you’ve really absorbed the material - for the good of us all.

"Reviews of the guide have ranged from "hilarious" and "classic" to "these should be burned along with ‘Harry Potter’ and ‘Lolita,’ you bad, bad, bad, bad man." Most libraries will not protest the banning of this book, and several librarians have called it a "nasty bit of business." There’s nothing too horrible in these, but all the same there may be a word or two that may be inappropriate for "wee people." Meaning kids. But if you consider yourself one of those "cool" parents, hey, go ahead. Hopefully your kids will pass along their therapy bills to you later on."

Read this book and you’ll laugh, yes, but you’ll also learn. You’ll learn that birds aren’t out there to look pretty, sing sweet songs and flit along the fingertips of blushing princesses. They’re living their lives, man. And once you’ve learned the truth, you’ll never look at birds the same way again. (Just try not to laugh when the birds can see you. It only upsets them more.)

[Images from the Guide to Troubled Birds via Flavorwire]

We aren’t sure if this Giant Isopod iPhone case would deter phone theft or actually encourage it, but either way it’s creepily awesome. You could chat on your isopod phone while snacking on a batch of adorably creepy isopod sausages or actual giant isopods.

Created exclusively for sale in Japan, these limited edition communication crustaceans come in both silver and gold versions, which sell for $80 and $120 respectively. Only 500 were produced, so we’d better buy plane tickets soon if we hope to snag one for ourselves.

It probably won’t fit in your pocket. But if your phone looked this fantastically freaky, would you ever want to put it away? Neither would we.

[via Geekologie]

Toronto-based artist/photographer and videographer Sara Angelucci created this awesomely surreal series of portraits combining anonymous 19th century carte-de-viste photos with images of extinct or endangered North American birds. Her beautifully strange series of bird people is called Aviary. Angelucci describes them as portraits that “portray creatures about to become ghosts.”

"Why birds? The photographer notes that her photographs are “hybrid crossovers of faith in science with a belief in otherworldly beings.” All of these birds were once plentiful during the late nineteenth century, and Angelucci’s humanizing of these delicate creatures is as much about respecting the earth and its creatures as it is about art."

Visit Sara Angelucci’s website to explore more of her intriguing artwork.

[via Beautiful/Decay and Design Observer]

How good is your posture? In Japan sitting with a hunched back is known as neko-ze, which translates to mean ‘cat’s back.’ Odds are good that many of us are sporting neko-ze right now as we sit in front of our computers. Poor posture is bad for our backs and can lead to other health issues.

That’s why Japanese toymaker Bandai is putting out this awesome set of eight hunchbacked cat figures, in hopes that slouching office workers will place them beside their computers as a friendly reminder to sit up straight. Say hello to weirdly cute toy kitties and goodbye to neko-ze.

As further encouragement, the series of capsule toys will include four secret cats who sit upright with perfect posture. Right now Bandai is only sharing their silhouettes, so we’ll have to wait until the June 24, 2014 release date to get a better look at them.

[via RocketNews24]

These fantastical paintings are the work of Brazilian artist Rafael Silveira. His ornate frames are as unusual and beguiling as the surreal paintings within them. His work is heavily influenced by the comics and cartoons he’s loved since he was little. We love how he describes it himself:

“I like to create my own symbolism, using unusual stuff as a metaphors,” said Silveira. “I believe that the universe talks with us using secret, unexpected signs.”

Silveira will be showing his latest paintings in a solo exhibition entitled Unforeseeable, which opens at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York on June 28th and runs through July 26, 2014

Head over to Hi-Fructose to check out more beautifully bizarre paintings by Rafael Silveira.

This is one of the strangest and most mysterious books on the shelves of the Archie McPhee Library. Haunted Air [Buy on Amazon], by British musician and artist Ossian Brown, is a fascinating collection of anonymous Halloween photographs taken between circa 1875 and 1955. They’re all from Brown’s personal collection and are presented without any context. In fact the only text in the entire book is the all too perfect foreword written by the inimitable David Lynch.

"The photographs in Haunted Air provide an extraordinary glimpse into the traditions of this macabre festival from ages past, and form an important document of photographic history. These are the pictures of the dead: family portraits, mementos of the treasured, now unrecognizable, and others.”

Each page contains a single bewitching photograph - a simple layout that makes the photos even creepier and more captivating. Without any background information, these haunting pieces of Americana have only each other for company. That is, until you start looking at them, wondering about them, making up stories for them. On the pages of this book, every day truly is Halloween.

[Photos from Haunted Air via NPR]

Artist Freya Jobbins uses dismembered doll parts and all sorts of other small plastic toys to create awesomely strange assemblage portraits of people and pop culture icons. Each sculpture is incredibly complex and detailed and they all seem to grow increasingly disturbing the longer we look at them. Check out that lush beard made using hair from the heads of who knows how many dolls.

Visit Freya Jobbins’ website and Facebook page to check out more of her unforgettable artwork.

[via Colossal and Juxtapoz]