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17 posts tagged Sugar

We continue to be blown away by the awesome (and completely edible) 3D-printed sugar sculptures created by The Sugar Lab team at 3D Systems (previously featured here). Pictured here are some of their geometric sugar cubes, ornate cake toppers, gorgeous sculptural pieces and a futuristic vase that feels like it belongs in an episode of Star Trek. They were all created using the ChefJet™ series of kitchen-ready 3D printers for edibles, which are expected to be on the market in the second half of 2014.

The Sugar Lab is currently had some of their 3D printed confections available for purchase via Cubify.

Head over to Twisted Sifter for additional images.

London-based food artist Michelle Wibowo of Michelle Sugar Art recently used nothing but cake decorations - miniature marshmallows and sprinkles - to recreate The Creation of Adam. She spent 168 hours and used 10,000 Cake Angels marshmallows and around half a billion cake sprinkles to complete her version of Michelangelo’s masterpiece. It measures 5.7 meters (18.7 ft) wide by 2.8 meters (9 ft) tall.

Set on plywood, the piece was first divided into grids and then Wibowo spent three days sketching the outline with pencil. While Michelangelo’s original painting was made with over 200 colors, Wibowo used just 24 different colored sprinkles to make her creation. The work is actually edible with the glue being made of a mixture of icing sugar, butter and vanilla frosting.

Michelle calls her sugary creation ‘The Baking of Adam' and it's currently on display at London’s St. Pancras Church as part of ongoing celebrations of the 450th anniversary of Michelangelo’s death in Rome at the age of 88.

Click here to watch a making-of video.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

For an awesome traveling, interactive art installation entitled Sugar Metropolis, professional sculptors Brendan Jamison and Mark Revels set up mountains of sugar cubes and invite visitors to use every last one of them to construct sweet crystalline cities. Visitors are free to work independently or collaborate with each other. They have over 500,000 sugar cube to work with and the results of their efforts are always unique.

Brendan and Mark are currently using a Kickstarter campaign to raise money to take their community art project to the Sugar Hill district of Harlem:

"The plan is to create the exhibit on the ground floor of a new Broadway Housing development which includes a children’s museum, a childcare center, a roof-top garden, and new affordable apartments (targeting low-income or special-needs residents). Across four weeks, anyone in the community will be welcomed in to share in the imaginative process and symbolically build upon a positive future within the community."

Click here to learn more.

Visit My Modern Metropolis for additional photos.

Here’s an awesome high-tech sweet for geeky valentines. Liz and Kyle von Hasseln of The Sugar Lab (previously featured here) used their ChefJet™ 3D printer to create these beautiful long stemmed chocolate sugar roses for Valentine’s Day.

It took their machine about an hour to produce three 7-inch-long chocolate roses. Although the long slender stems are delicate, the roses are strong enough to be displayed in a vase. According to Liz and Kyle, the roses taste like a rich chocolate cookie. Yum!

[via Cubify]

These beautiful geometric objects are 3D-printed sugar sculptures and they’re some of the prettiest pieces of candy we’ve ever seen. They were made by 3D Systems and The Sugar Lab. The latter is a micro-design firm created by Liz and Kyle von Hasseln, a husband and wife team dedicated to the awesome craft of creating bespoke, 3D-printed edible confections.

‘The overlap of technology, food and art is so rich, and the potential for customization and innovation is limitless,’ said Liz von Hasseln, cofounder of The Sugar Lab. Existing commercial applications for printable sugar include complex sculptural cakes for weddings and special events that are made possible only with 3D printing, and customizable confections for bake shops and restaurants. continued von Hasseln, ‘We see our technology quickly evolving into a variety of flavors and foods, powered by real food printers for professionals and consumers alike and we could not think of a more qualified partner than 3D systems to help make that a reality.’

3D Systems and The Sugar Lab introduced two food printing appliances at CES 2014, the ChefJet and the ChefJet Pro:

The ChefJet will deliver single-color prints; while the more advanced ChefJet Pro will dispatch full color prints. Both can produce either sugar or milk chocolate confections, in different flavors that include cherry, mint and sour apple, and will be available to the market later this year.

Click here to watch a demo of the ChefJet™ at CES 2014

[via designboom]

Art + Candy = Awesome

If you travel to China’s Sichuan Province you might have the good fortune to encounter a street artisan practicing a form of Chinese folk art that has been around since the Ming Dynasty: painting with caramelized sugar. As this video shows, these masters make their delicate craft look completely effortless. And the best part is, once a piece has been completed, some lucky person gets to eat it!

“Painting” artistic pieces from melted sugar is very different than regular painting. Because the hot sugar cools down very quickly, the painter has to work swiftly, making sure he follows the correct order of strokes to get every shape just right. In order to get familiar with the process and the technique, it’s recommended that artists practice normal painting first.

Practitioners of this centuries-old craft use brown or white sugar as the main material, a bronze spoon and a small shovel as tools, and a slab of marble as the canvas. The sugar is melted over a fiery pot and spread over the canvas with the spoon. Once the shape is completed, the shovel is used to glue a wooden stick to the artwork and to separate it from the marble slab. For around to Chinese yuan (30 cents) you can have your very own caramelized sugar dragon or phoenix and a unique souvenir.

Visit Oddity Central to learn more about this tasty and astonishing craft.

Here’s some awesome, if misguided, candy-related wisdom from Life magazine, February 25, 1946: The makers of Dextrose purport to answer the question, “Why do children crave candy?” Why indeed. 
Here’s our favourite part: “Pure, wholesome candy in reasonable amounts and at the right time is a valuable factor in balanced nutrition at all ages.”
So don’t make the mistake of only feeding your kids fruit, vegetables, and dairy products. Their higher energy requirements mean they NEED to be fed candy each and every day because “Candy is an energy food.”
And don’t you forget it.
It’s Candy Day on Geyser of Awesome!

Here’s some awesome, if misguided, candy-related wisdom from Life magazine, February 25, 1946: The makers of Dextrose purport to answer the question, “Why do children crave candy?” Why indeed. 

Here’s our favourite part: “Pure, wholesome candy in reasonable amounts and at the right time is a valuable factor in balanced nutrition at all ages.”

So don’t make the mistake of only feeding your kids fruit, vegetables, and dairy products. Their higher energy requirements mean they NEED to be fed candy each and every day because “Candy is an energy food.”

And don’t you forget it.

It’s Candy Day on Geyser of Awesome!

This nightmarish, yet still quite enticing, bit of dessert is a Dexter cupcake. 
Redditor Pommedauphine works for a bakery that was commissioned by Showtime to make cupcakes for the recent premiere of season 7 of Dexter. They’re red velvet cupcakes with shards of sugar glass embedded in the whipped vanilla icing, splattered with red simply syrup for blood. Yum!
[via Neatorama Halloween]

This nightmarish, yet still quite enticing, bit of dessert is a Dexter cupcake. 

Redditor Pommedauphine works for a bakery that was commissioned by Showtime to make cupcakes for the recent premiere of season 7 of Dexter. They’re red velvet cupcakes with shards of sugar glass embedded in the whipped vanilla icing, splattered with red simply syrup for blood. Yum!

[via Neatorama Halloween]

Source neatorama.com