Taiwanese cardboard artist Kai-Xiang Xhong created this completely awesome cardboard Iron Man suit that’s not just a life-size model, it’s also wearable.

"I used pepakura technique. But I did not add any special color on the surface. Keeping the cardboard color and texture was deliberate. That’s my style."

Click here to watch a brief video in which Xhong describes his project.

Head over to the Stan Winston School of character Arts to check out more of Kai-Xiang Xhong’s cardboard creations.

[via GeekTyrant]

Today the Department of Awesome Parenting pays tribute to Chu Huang, a father in Zhejiang Province, China who, instead of simply telling his young son that he can be anything he wants when he grows up, spent a month building a spectacular golden Iron Man suit for his son to grow into.
Huang is a doctor who works long hours at his own clinic and is rarely able to take a day off. His professional life is so busy that he mostly sees his son at night just in time to read him a bedtime story. He wanted to do something special for the boy and, knowing how much he loves fictional characters in armor, decided to handcraft a full-size Iron Man suit just for him.

"Having no prior experience in crafting such costumes, Huang spent over a month scouring threads on hobby forums and websites, seeking advice and instructions. Over the next month, Huang spent his free time in the evening crafting the suit; drafting and cutting the pieces out of EVA plastic sheets, spray painting the pieces, and then fixing the pieces together and making final adjustments to the suit. His son watched him intently throughout the entire crafting process."

Huang’s Iron Man suit features a Chinese flag on the chest and a yin-yang symbol on the palms of its hands. His son was so excited by the completed suit that he immediately asked his dad to put it on so he could show his kindergarten classmates.
Visit RocketNews24 to learn more about Chu Huang, Iron Dad.

Today the Department of Awesome Parenting pays tribute to Chu Huang, a father in Zhejiang Province, China who, instead of simply telling his young son that he can be anything he wants when he grows up, spent a month building a spectacular golden Iron Man suit for his son to grow into.

Huang is a doctor who works long hours at his own clinic and is rarely able to take a day off. His professional life is so busy that he mostly sees his son at night just in time to read him a bedtime story. He wanted to do something special for the boy and, knowing how much he loves fictional characters in armor, decided to handcraft a full-size Iron Man suit just for him.

"Having no prior experience in crafting such costumes, Huang spent over a month scouring threads on hobby forums and websites, seeking advice and instructions. Over the next month, Huang spent his free time in the evening crafting the suit; drafting and cutting the pieces out of EVA plastic sheets, spray painting the pieces, and then fixing the pieces together and making final adjustments to the suit. His son watched him intently throughout the entire crafting process."

Huang’s Iron Man suit features a Chinese flag on the chest and a yin-yang symbol on the palms of its hands. His son was so excited by the completed suit that he immediately asked his dad to put it on so he could show his kindergarten classmates.

Visit RocketNews24 to learn more about Chu Huang, Iron Dad.

After breaking a bone and getting stuck with an itchy cast for six weeks, some people make the best of it by decorating that cast. mental_floss assembled a great collection of examples of people turning an unfortunate occurrence into an awesome opportunity for self-expression.

Nicholas Frausto decorated his mother’s cast with Vincent van Gogh’s Starry Night. Artist Zak Kinsella used the Doctor’s TARDIS to transform his friend Laura Keeney’s cast into one capable of traveling through time and space. J. Giz Patterson used spray paint, paint pens and metal spikes to turn his cast into a punked out x-ray. And, perhaps best of all, Katie of Love Paper Paint helped turn her injured son into his Iron Man, his favourite superhero.

Visit mental_floss to check out more fantastically decorated casts.

Stop throwing away your bottle caps! You could be using them to create a spectacular Halloween costume instead. This fantastic getup is called The Capped Crusader and it was created by Richmond, VA-based bottle cap artist Josh Stolberg using 3,284 beer bottle caps.

Josh and his helpful friends drank 330 gallons of 63 different types of beer from 81 breweries in order to collects all of those caps. That’s already a lot of work. But then Josh spent 250 hours over the course of 3 months actually putting the costume together. Not including the cost of all that beer, he spent $240 on supplies, clothing and tools in order to complete the project. The finished suit weights 16.5 pounds and putting it on requires a bit of help from Josh’s girlfriend.

Visit RVA CapWorks to learn more about how this amazing bottle cap costume was created.

[via Fashionably Geek]

"It’s not who are are underneath, but what we do that defines us."

Last week all eyes were on San Francisco when Miles Scott, a 5-year-old Leukemia survivor and huge fan of Batman, saw his wish to become Batkid come true. Batkid joined forces with Batman and spent the day saving SF/Gotham City from dastardly villains. The event was made possible by the Make-A-Wish Foundation, the city of San Francisco, and countless enthusiastic volunteers. Even Clark Kent and Lois Lane got in on the action.

Now YouTube user SandD2012 has turned the awesome citywide event into a fantastic movie trailer using footage from Miles’ big day and music from The Dark Knight Rises. The BatKid Rises Trailer is 1:41 that’s pretty much guaranteed to brighten your day.

[via BuzzFeed]

Ohio balloon artist Jeff Wright of Wright Entertainment (previously featured here) has created an awesome new balloon suit. We’ve already seen him decked out as Balloon Buzz Lightyear and Balloon Mario riding Balloon Yoshi. Now Jeff is back in all his inflatable splendour as Balloon Iron Man.

Jeff made his inflatable Iron Man armor using 500 balloons after being challenged to do so by blinkbox, who wanted to do something special to celebrate their early digital release of Iron Man 3.

Jeff, who works as a volunteer in an orphanage in Bolivia, jumped at the challenge — and the result is stunning. Made up of hundreds of balloons carefully intertwined, he has artfully recreated the legendary red and yellow suit with meticulous attention to detail.

Jeff comments: “I was trying to decide what costume to do next when I got an email from blinkbox. I’m a huge fan of the Iron Man films and couldn’t resist the challenge. After some careful planning I was ready and asked a friend to film the whole process right here in Bolivia.”

Visit Laughing Squid to check out a couple of Jeff’s videos showing how he made the Iron Man suit and how to make your own inflatable Iron Man helmet.

Today we dropped in on the Department of Awesomely Good Deeds and learned about one of the world’s lesser-known superheroes. More about simply helping people out than fighting crime, this Japanese superhero has undertaken a very specific and localized duty.
Meet Tadahiro Kanemasu, seen here carrying a woman’s shopping cart for her while they walk down the stairs towards a Tokyo subway station. In his shiny green and silver Power Rangers suit and mask, Tadahiro positions himself at the stairs of this subway station waiting for travelers in need of help carrying packages, carts, and strollers up or down the stairs.

The slender 27-year-old has spent three months being a good Samaritan at the station on Tokyo’s western side. Like many in the city, it has neither elevators nor escalators and a long flight of dimly lit stairs.
"Japanese people find it hard to accept help, they feel obligated to the other person, so the mask really helps me out," said Tadahiro Kanemasu.
Since Kanemasu can set aside only a couple of hours each day for his good deeds, he hopes to recruit others in different colored suits. Already he has inquiries about pink and red.
Kanemasu admitted he got off to a bit of a rocky start. “When I first began, people basically said ‘Get away from me, you weirdo’,” he said. “Now they still think I’m weird but in a good way.”

Photo by Yuya Shino.
[via Telegraph.co.uk and The Huffington Post]

Today we dropped in on the Department of Awesomely Good Deeds and learned about one of the world’s lesser-known superheroes. More about simply helping people out than fighting crime, this Japanese superhero has undertaken a very specific and localized duty.

Meet Tadahiro Kanemasu, seen here carrying a woman’s shopping cart for her while they walk down the stairs towards a Tokyo subway station. In his shiny green and silver Power Rangers suit and mask, Tadahiro positions himself at the stairs of this subway station waiting for travelers in need of help carrying packages, carts, and strollers up or down the stairs.

The slender 27-year-old has spent three months being a good Samaritan at the station on Tokyo’s western side. Like many in the city, it has neither elevators nor escalators and a long flight of dimly lit stairs.

"Japanese people find it hard to accept help, they feel obligated to the other person, so the mask really helps me out," said Tadahiro Kanemasu.

Since Kanemasu can set aside only a couple of hours each day for his good deeds, he hopes to recruit others in different colored suits. Already he has inquiries about pink and red.

Kanemasu admitted he got off to a bit of a rocky start. “When I first began, people basically said ‘Get away from me, you weirdo’,” he said. “Now they still think I’m weird but in a good way.”

Photo by Yuya Shino.

[via Telegraph.co.uk and The Huffington Post]

We recently featured an awesome LEGO sculpture of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles that was on display at the 2013 San Diego Comic-Con. Here are two more amazing superhero sculptures created by LEGO’s Master Builders: a 7-foot-tall Superman and 6.5-foot-tall Iron Man. It looks like Iron Man’s eyes and arc reactor actually light up too. Super awesome!

[via Nerd Approved]

In August of 1962, the publication of Amazing Fantasy #15 marked the very first appearance of Spider-Man. That issue is now a rare and very expensive comic. Instructables member kevinmakes has always wanted a copy to hang on his wall, so he came up with an awesome way to do just that without using the comic itself.

Using a high-resolution image of the cover and his own ingenuity, kevinmakes created a beautiful layered wooden replica. Visit his Instructables page to find out exactly how he did it.

[via Technabob]

Spiritual Hero is an awesome series of sleek digital renderings, created by Italian artist Antonio Strafella, envisioning comic book, movie, and cartoon characters as beautiful religious icons. He says of his own work:

“These icons have various aspects in common: saints do miracles and superheroes have superpowers, both are venerated, opening the conflict between faith and zealotry.”

[via Beautiful Decay]