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86 posts tagged Sweets

Behold the sweet, sticky, deep-fried awesomeness that is the Double Hundred Dozen, for those days when a single dozen doughnuts simply won’t suffice. It’s the the biggest box of doughnuts we’ve ever seen and it was just unveiled in London by Krispy Kreme UK for their new Occasions offering.

The 3.5 m (~11.5 ft) long box contains 2,400 Original Glazed doughnuts. It took eight staff members worked together to fill the box and load it onto the delivery truck. The company is currently holding a contest to celebrate the launch of their large-scale delivery service. One lucky business will win a Double Hundred Dozen. We hope the winners aren’t messy eaters, because that’s how you get ants.

And please, should you dare to order a Double Hundred Dozen doughnuts, please make sure you brush and floss after feasting on all that sugary fried dough.

[via The Telegraph, the Daily Star and Krispy Kreme UK]

It’s never too early to start planning what to offer your neighborhood trick-or-treaters. These remarkably/horrifyingly lifelike gummy grubs and caterpillars would make awesome Halloween treats. Although they may look like they just wriggled out of your nightmares, they’re actually handmade, fruit-filled sweets. They’re made in Japan at Akai Tento no Koohii Ten (The Red Tent Coffee Shop), a small coffee stand located on the east coast of Aomori Prefecture.

We can’t stop staring at these photos, because we’re convinced one of the grubs is about to twitch. Akai Tento is a small business, but these amazingly unsettling creepy-crawly gummy candies have earned the shop nationwide (and now international) attention.

Each of Akai Tento’s gruesome gummies is available to buy individually or in packs (or perhaps that should be clutches?) via Yahoo! Japan Shopping, and cost between 300 and 350 yen (US$2.80-3.20) each.

Photos via Akai Tento and Yahoo! Shopping

[via RocketNews24]

More cake please! London-based food artist Michelle Wibowo of Michelle Sugar Art (previously featured here) recently created the world’s first completely edible billboard, made entirely out of cake. The mouthwatering advertisement for Mr Kipling, the UK’s largest cake manufacturer, measures 6m x 3m (~20ft x 10ft) and consists of 13,360 Mr Kipling cakes. Wibowo spent 6 hours assembling her creation the night before its unveiling.

Bearing a message we couldn’t agree with more - “Life is Better with Cake” - the billboard hangs outside the Westfield Shopping Centre in the Shepherd’s Bush, London. Here’s the best part: after the billboard was unveiled, it was gleefully devoured by lucky passersby, one tasty cake at a time.

Click here to watch a time-lapse video of the billboard’s construction.

[via Michelle Sugar Art and Foodiggity]

Let’s check in on the decadent, completely inedible, yet perfectly wearable shoes from The Shoe Bakery (previously featured here). The Orlando, Florida-based company is run by Chris Campbell, who loves both shoes and sweets so much that he decided to combine them in the form of outrageously tantalizing ice cream, cake and donut-themed footwear.

If you’ve got a specific dessert and shoe combination in mind, Campbell happily accepts custom orders. Each mouthwatering pair of Shoe Bakery shoes takes about 3-6 weeks to design, create and ship. Prices range from $200 to $400 US, which should provide you with all the more incentive to refrain from trying to eat them.

Visit The Shoe Bakery’s website to check out more of their enticingly iced footwear.

[via Design Taxi]

Last month we shared a fantastic Cyberman Cake created by Welsh bespoke bakery Happy Occasions Cakes. Just in time for the triumphant return of the Doctor, Happy Occasions is back with to challenge our Whovian survival instinct anew with this terrifyingly awesome Dalek cake, complete with a light-up eyestalk and illuminated base. It’s sure to exterminate your appetite and, if you keep on eating, perhaps blast a few cavities into your teeth as well.

Visit the Happy Occasions Cakes Facebook Page to check out more of their amazing custom cakes.

[via That’s Nerdalicious!]

In Japan you can enjoy your favorite anime, cartoon and video game characters as more than simply visual entertainment. They’re also available as sweet treats. These kawaii confections are a form of wagashi (和菓子) called nerikiri (練り切り). Made from white bean paste and rice-based dough, nerikiri are often tinted and molded similar to how marzipan is prepared in Western desserts.

These pop culture-inspired nerikiri were all made by Japanese Twitter user Otakumi at a wagashi shop called Kuramoto Hinode, which is located in the Tokushima Prefecture of Japan’s Shikoku island.

Follow Otakumi’s Twitter feed

You can also try your hand at making your very own nerikiri. Click here for the recipe.

[via Kotaku]

Candy is awesome, but candy that’s made as the result of a lively musical performance is super awesome! This hypnotic video shows a traditional Korean candy cutter using a heavy pair of shears and a trowel to hammer and cut pieces of hobakyeot, a pumpkin-flavored form of Yeot, a traditional Korean confection that’s similar to taffy.

These candy artisans turn what could be a monotonous process, cutting many small pieces from one large block, into a dynamic and engaging performance with a tasty result.

Click here for additional videos of Korean candy cutters in action.

Video posted YouTube user Victoria Nagy.

[via Reddit]

What could possibly be better than a pile of LEGOs, each tiny piece so full of potential? How about LEGO bricks made of mouthwatering chocolate? Yep, that’ll do it. These awesome, completely functional and 100% edible Chocolate LEGO bricks are the work of Japanese illustrator and designer Akihiro Mizuuchi.

The bricks are made by pouring melted chocolate into precisely designed molds. After the chocolate has cooled, the edible LEGOs can be popped out of the molds and used just like regular LEGO bricks. That is, until you’re overcome by the urge to start eating them.

Now we’re one step closer to living in a Land of Chocolate.

[via Colossal]

Don’t run away! This particular “Nightmare in Silver" is 100% edible and not the least bit interested in destroying all life on earth. This Cyberman is an awesome cake made by Happy Occasions Cakes, a bespoke bakery located in Cwmbran, Wales. While we understand that the existence of this geektastic cake creates a distinct conflict between the Whovian survival instinct and sweet tooth, we’re pretty sure our overwhelming love of cake would triumph in the end.

Visit the Happy Occasions Cakes Facebook Page to check out more of their fantastic custom creations.

[via That’s Nerdalicious!]

This adorable little hedgehog was made using almonds, eggs, cream, sugar and then even more almonds. We love him, not just because he’s so cute, but because he was created using a recipe that was written all the way back in 1817. Think about that for a second. What that means is that even 200 years ago people were coming up with novelty treats and edible sculptures shaped like ridiculously cute animals.
The recipe comes from a book entitled Treatise on Confectionary, written by Joseph Bell. Here it is:

To make a Hedge Hog.
Take 1lb. Valentia almonds; blanch and beat them very fine, with a little rose water; mix in the yolks of six eggs; whisk up the whites of four eggs very stiff; mix all together, with half a pint of cream, and sweeten it with beat sugar to your taste; set the whole in a stew pan on a clear fire, and stir it till it is thick enough to model into the shape of a hedge hog; put a small currant for each eye, and stick it all over with cut almonds for the bristles of the hedge hog; then set it on a dish, and pour over it a rich custard.

It’s actually possible that this recipe is even older still. It may be a reprint from this 1747 source. So the next time you find yourself daydreaming about 18th/19th century banquets, as we know some of you sometimes do, don’t forget to include the ornamental, edible almond hedgehog.
[via TYWKIWDBI and Echoes from the Vault]

This adorable little hedgehog was made using almonds, eggs, cream, sugar and then even more almonds. We love him, not just because he’s so cute, but because he was created using a recipe that was written all the way back in 1817. Think about that for a second. What that means is that even 200 years ago people were coming up with novelty treats and edible sculptures shaped like ridiculously cute animals.

The recipe comes from a book entitled Treatise on Confectionary, written by Joseph Bell. Here it is:

To make a Hedge Hog.

Take 1lb. Valentia almonds; blanch and beat them very fine, with a little rose water; mix in the yolks of six eggs; whisk up the whites of four eggs very stiff; mix all together, with half a pint of cream, and sweeten it with beat sugar to your taste; set the whole in a stew pan on a clear fire, and stir it till it is thick enough to model into the shape of a hedge hog; put a small currant for each eye, and stick it all over with cut almonds for the bristles of the hedge hog; then set it on a dish, and pour over it a rich custard.

It’s actually possible that this recipe is even older still. It may be a reprint from this 1747 source. So the next time you find yourself daydreaming about 18th/19th century banquets, as we know some of you sometimes do, don’t forget to include the ornamental, edible almond hedgehog.

[via TYWKIWDBI and Echoes from the Vault]