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23 posts tagged Tokyo

We featured plenty of different miniature fake foods, but what about awesomely tiny food that’s actually edible? Japanese chef Hironori Ikeno works at a restaurant in the Nohachi district of Tokyo where he creates pieces of sushi that are so small, each piece of fish sits atop a single grain of rice.

It began as a joke with a customer, but ten years later Chef Ikeno offers seven different types of impossibly small sushi. Each piece of itty-bitty Nigirizushi weighs less than one gram and requires five minutes of preparation time (compared to the normal-sized versions, which require less than a minute to assemble).

Click here to watch a brief video demonstration of Chef Ikeno assembling his amazing single-grain sushi.

[via Foodiggity and First We Feast]

We’ve just found the parfait equivalent of the outrageously overindulgent bloody mary. This sweet triple-decker monstrosity is called the EST 48 (named after its towering 18.9 inch height) and it’s on the menu at Café Est! Est!, located in a shopping and dining complex in the heart of downtown Tokyo next to Shinjuku Station.

The café offers a wide assortment of outrageously over-the-top partfaits (some come topped with slices of cake), but the EST 48 is by far the most decadent of them all. It comes topped with not one, but two ice cream cones, both of which are covered with toppings and sprinkles.

"At the base, there’s a dish of vanilla ice cream ringed with strawberries, bananas, and Pocky sticks (plus imitation Corn Flakes, as is seemingly required by Japanese sundae regulations). On top of that there’s an ice cream cone with chocolate sauce and sprinkles. Inserted into that is another ice cream cone, this time with strawberry sauce and more sprinkles. And finally, just to make sure the whole thing doesn’t visually disappoint by being too short, there’s an umbrella."

We can feel a brain freeze coming on simply by considering trying to eat the awesome EST 48.

Visit RocketNews24 for additional photos.

We love a Crazy Cat Lady here at the Geyser of Awesome, so it’s our pleasure to introduce you to Junko Suzuki. Ms. Suzuki lives in Tokyo and loves cats so much that, in addition to sharing her home with feline friends, she’s been collecting cat-related items for the past 40 years. She owns so many cat-related things, over 10,000 pieces, that she spent 2.5 years organizing her collection and turning her house into a cat museum.

Dubbed “Nyanyamoan” (にゃにゃもあん), the museum opened in 2012 and is located on the second floor of Suzuki’s house. Suzuki decided to create the museum because she thought it would be sad to just to pack away these faux cats she had acquired over the years. Creating a museum would be a good excuse to keep the items out.

Cat merchandise of all sorts, including plenty of Hello Kitty stuff, is neatly arranged on the floor, stacked on numerous shelves, displayed in cabinets and hung on the walls and ceiling. Items are themed to suit the room in which they’re displayed - so bath-related products are in the bathroom and so on. For a modest entrance fee, Suzuki personally guides visitors through her collection.

Visit Kotaku to view more photos of Junko Suzuki’s awesome cat collection.

Check out this awesome music video by Japanese performer and former martial artist Genki Sudo along with his pop band World Order. For their single “Welcome to TOKYO.” the group performed their signature slow-motion synchronized robotic dancing in the center of bustling street throughout Tokyo. Their captivating performance is made all the more mesmerizing because of the crowds of people all around them going about their business at normal speed.

[via Laughing Squid]

Today we dropped in on the Department of Awesomely Good Deeds and learned about one of the world’s lesser-known superheroes. More about simply helping people out than fighting crime, this Japanese superhero has undertaken a very specific and localized duty.
Meet Tadahiro Kanemasu, seen here carrying a woman’s shopping cart for her while they walk down the stairs towards a Tokyo subway station. In his shiny green and silver Power Rangers suit and mask, Tadahiro positions himself at the stairs of this subway station waiting for travelers in need of help carrying packages, carts, and strollers up or down the stairs.

The slender 27-year-old has spent three months being a good Samaritan at the station on Tokyo’s western side. Like many in the city, it has neither elevators nor escalators and a long flight of dimly lit stairs.
"Japanese people find it hard to accept help, they feel obligated to the other person, so the mask really helps me out," said Tadahiro Kanemasu.
Since Kanemasu can set aside only a couple of hours each day for his good deeds, he hopes to recruit others in different colored suits. Already he has inquiries about pink and red.
Kanemasu admitted he got off to a bit of a rocky start. “When I first began, people basically said ‘Get away from me, you weirdo’,” he said. “Now they still think I’m weird but in a good way.”

Photo by Yuya Shino.
[via Telegraph.co.uk and The Huffington Post]

Today we dropped in on the Department of Awesomely Good Deeds and learned about one of the world’s lesser-known superheroes. More about simply helping people out than fighting crime, this Japanese superhero has undertaken a very specific and localized duty.

Meet Tadahiro Kanemasu, seen here carrying a woman’s shopping cart for her while they walk down the stairs towards a Tokyo subway station. In his shiny green and silver Power Rangers suit and mask, Tadahiro positions himself at the stairs of this subway station waiting for travelers in need of help carrying packages, carts, and strollers up or down the stairs.

The slender 27-year-old has spent three months being a good Samaritan at the station on Tokyo’s western side. Like many in the city, it has neither elevators nor escalators and a long flight of dimly lit stairs.

"Japanese people find it hard to accept help, they feel obligated to the other person, so the mask really helps me out," said Tadahiro Kanemasu.

Since Kanemasu can set aside only a couple of hours each day for his good deeds, he hopes to recruit others in different colored suits. Already he has inquiries about pink and red.

Kanemasu admitted he got off to a bit of a rocky start. “When I first began, people basically said ‘Get away from me, you weirdo’,” he said. “Now they still think I’m weird but in a good way.”

Photo by Yuya Shino.

[via Telegraph.co.uk and The Huffington Post]

Imagine hitting random on Google Street View and getting this! That’s what happened to a lucky Redditor who stumble across this scene on a sidewalk in Tokyo. A group of people (Hatoful Boyfriend Cosplayers?) in our Pigeon Mask stood waiting for the Google photographer to go by. It had to have been planned in advance because you can see them on the entire approach and they brought their own photographer to document the event. 

This is by far the best use of the Pigeon Mask so far!

[via Google Maps and Reddit]

Source google.com

Who is that cheerful man with the adorably double-braided beard and why is he dressed up as a Japanese schoolgirl? Kotaku’s Brian Ashcraft has the scoop: This is Hideaki Kobayashi and he’s known (and rightfully so) as “Sailor Suit Old Man.”

Recently, Japanese sites and Twitter users in Tokyo have spotted an old guy dressed in a sailor style school uniform—a truly unusual sight to behold. People were amused. People were baffled. What the hell was going on?!

Japanese site IT Media met Kobayashi and asked him the question on everyone’s mind: Why do you dress like a Japanese schoolgirl?

"That’s a difficult question," said Kobayashi. "It’s not really something I’ve thought too deeply about. Hrm. I guess it’s because sailor suits look good on me?"

We hope Mr. Kobayashi has some inkling of just how awesome he is. We can’t stop smiling as we look at these photos. Head over to Kotaku to learn more about “Sailor Suit Old Man,” our new hero of Japanese weirdness.

Japanese artist Rie Hosokai of Daisy Balloon creates awesome dresses using balloons. Her latest pieces were constructed as part of ‘Piece for Peace’ - a charity art exhibition at Parco Gallery in Tokyo that runs until January 9, 2013.

Photos by Satoshi Minakawa and Hiroshi Manaka respectively

[via Design Boom]