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33 posts tagged Treats

This adorable little hedgehog was made using almonds, eggs, cream, sugar and then even more almonds. We love him, not just because he’s so cute, but because he was created using a recipe that was written all the way back in 1817. Think about that for a second. What that means is that even 200 years ago people were coming up with novelty treats and edible sculptures shaped like ridiculously cute animals.
The recipe comes from a book entitled Treatise on Confectionary, written by Joseph Bell. Here it is:

To make a Hedge Hog.
Take 1lb. Valentia almonds; blanch and beat them very fine, with a little rose water; mix in the yolks of six eggs; whisk up the whites of four eggs very stiff; mix all together, with half a pint of cream, and sweeten it with beat sugar to your taste; set the whole in a stew pan on a clear fire, and stir it till it is thick enough to model into the shape of a hedge hog; put a small currant for each eye, and stick it all over with cut almonds for the bristles of the hedge hog; then set it on a dish, and pour over it a rich custard.

It’s actually possible that this recipe is even older still. It may be a reprint from this 1747 source. So the next time you find yourself daydreaming about 18th/19th century banquets, as we know some of you sometimes do, don’t forget to include the ornamental, edible almond hedgehog.
[via TYWKIWDBI and Echoes from the Vault]

This adorable little hedgehog was made using almonds, eggs, cream, sugar and then even more almonds. We love him, not just because he’s so cute, but because he was created using a recipe that was written all the way back in 1817. Think about that for a second. What that means is that even 200 years ago people were coming up with novelty treats and edible sculptures shaped like ridiculously cute animals.

The recipe comes from a book entitled Treatise on Confectionary, written by Joseph Bell. Here it is:

To make a Hedge Hog.

Take 1lb. Valentia almonds; blanch and beat them very fine, with a little rose water; mix in the yolks of six eggs; whisk up the whites of four eggs very stiff; mix all together, with half a pint of cream, and sweeten it with beat sugar to your taste; set the whole in a stew pan on a clear fire, and stir it till it is thick enough to model into the shape of a hedge hog; put a small currant for each eye, and stick it all over with cut almonds for the bristles of the hedge hog; then set it on a dish, and pour over it a rich custard.

It’s actually possible that this recipe is even older still. It may be a reprint from this 1747 source. So the next time you find yourself daydreaming about 18th/19th century banquets, as we know some of you sometimes do, don’t forget to include the ornamental, edible almond hedgehog.

[via TYWKIWDBI and Echoes from the Vault]

Here in the northern hemisphere summer has officially begun, which means the time is ripe for picnics and tricking treating friends and family alike to ice cream sandwiches that looks just like mouthwatering cheeseburgers.

These fantastic frozen treats were created by Beth Klosterboer of Hungry Happenings (previously featured here), who dubbed them Chilly Cheeseburgers (get it?). The buns are made of vanilla cake, the beef patty is chocolate ice cream and the fixings are made of modeling chocolate and cookie icing. Yum!

Click here for the complete recipe and instructions.

[via Foodiggity]

These enticing cones of rose-shaped ice cream are a Japanese treat known as Chirin-chirin ice cream. For the past 50 years they’ve been sold at tourist spots throughout Nagasaki city, usually by kindly little old ladies. The ice cream has a texture similar to sorbet and the rose is created by scooping it up in small petal-shaped portions and skillfully pressing the petals together, one at a time, while rotating the cone. Click here to watch a video of chirin-chirin being made.

Head over to RocketNews24 to learn more about this yummy Japanese summer treat.

Kawaii! These little kitties aren’t just unbelievably cute, they’re also edible. They’re made by a Japanese mom named Caroline for Neko no Hi or Cat Day, which takes place each year on February 22nd.

Cat-shaped treats seem like a wonderful way to celebrate how much you like your feline friends. These treats are cat-shaped nerikiri, which is “a traditional Japanese sweet made by mixing shiro-an (sweetened white bean paste) with gyuhi (made of glutinous rice, similar to mochi but softer).” Caroline sculpts her nerikiri cats and kittens into various sizes and poses and then uses edible dyes to add distinguishing markings and fine details. She even makes little accessories for them, like tea sets and pillows for extra-comfy lounging.

Based on the effort that goes into making these sweets, it seems likely that Caroline’s family probably has at least one real life cat of their own and we’re guessing it leads a wonderfully spoiled life.

Visit RocketNews24 for additional photos.

Thanksgiving and the start of Hanukkah fall on the same day this year. The Zucker Bakery in Alphabet City, Manhattan is celebrating this special holiday concurrence by offering a tantalizing selection of Thanksgivukkah donuts. They aren’t like any donuts we’ve seen before.

The flavours include Sweet Potato Donuts with Toasted Marshmallow filling, Spiced Pumpkin Donuts with Turkey-Cranberry Filling, Spiced Pumpkin Donut with Turkey-Gravy Filling, and Cranberry Donuts. They look and sound delicious. If you’re in New York, please pay them a visit and enjoy a few Thanksgivukkah donuts for us.

[via Serious Eats and Zucker Bakery]

Artist Jason Freeny (previously featured here) just put an awesome original sculpture up for sale on eBay. Entitled 5 Second Rule, it’s an enormous orange sherbet push-up pop that may have just been dropped on the kitchen floor by a giant. It looks exactly the ones we used to buy from the ice cream truck, only much much bigger.
Measuring 48” tall, the massive melting treat was made using polyurethane foam, construction tube, wood, PVC Tubing, and acrylic paint. And it’s available here.

Artist Jason Freeny (previously featured here) just put an awesome original sculpture up for sale on eBay. Entitled 5 Second Rule, it’s an enormous orange sherbet push-up pop that may have just been dropped on the kitchen floor by a giant. It looks exactly the ones we used to buy from the ice cream truck, only much much bigger.

Measuring 48” tall, the massive melting treat was made using polyurethane foam, construction tube, wood, PVC Tubing, and acrylic paint. And it’s available here.

Vicky Freeman filled this spooky head with treats and hung it in her backyard in the town of Fareham, Hamshire, England. It didn’t take long for an inquisitive squirrel to check it out and scarf down all of the treats, while sometimes looking like the ghastly undead head was her own. It’s like a Halloween version of our Big Head Squirrel Feeder.

The 54-year-old grandmother said: ‘I always hang stuff up in my garden for the kids at Halloween but was surprised to see a squirrel so fascinated by the macabre skull it - looks really scary!’

[via Dailymail.co.uk]

It’s Hooray for Halloween Day on Geyser of Awesome!

Kawaii! It doesn’t surprise us at all to learn that Japan produces some of the cutest donuts we’ve ever seen. And boy, do we ever wish that we could taste them too. They even make cute walrus donuts! In Japanese these happy-making donuts are called “doubutsu doonatsu” (どうぶつドーナツ), which simply means “animal donuts.” Here’s a bit about their sweet history:

The two donut shops in Japan known for their animal rings are Animal Doughnut of Ikumimama and Floresta. There’s a reason for that: Both have a shared history and a shared employee.

One of the Floresta staffers who helped create the animal donuts, a woman named Ikumi Nakao, has spun off an animal donut specialty shop called Animal Doughnut of Ikumimama, which opened in Kawasaki this past June.

In August 2012, Ikumi started uploading her animal donuts to Twitter, and they soon caused an internet sensation. Her handmade animal donuts were viewed over 200,000 times online and appeared on television in Japan. But she wanted to return to Kawasaki to raise her family and was able to with her own adorable animal donut shop. How sweet!

It’s hard to keep from smiling when your food is smiling at you. Head over to Kotaku to learn more about and view many more photos of these ridiculously, wonderfully cute animal donuts.

[via That’s Nerdalicious! and Kotaku]

Cotton candy is so sweet and yummy that we’ve always happily eaten it without paying any attention to the fact that it usually looks like the end of a giant cotton swab. That has all changed since we first watched this hypnotic video in which a skilled street vendor in Ciqikou, Chongqing, China creates servings of spun sugar that look like enormous, colourful flowers.

Great big, fluffy flowers of sugary awesomeness.

[via That’s Nerdalicious!]